U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Health and Wellness
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-05-2018, 04:36 PM
 
19 posts, read 1,639 times
Reputation: 28

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by reneeh63 View Post
What does "many" vegans developed cancer mean? I don't think a lot of it but I'd sure want to see some real research when you're making such a specific claim.

https://www.newsweek.com/vegan-youtu...disease-815021


https://veganhealth.org/cancer-rates-of-vegetarians/


https://www.researchgate.net/blog/po...-heart-disease


The point is that not eating meat, isn't going to change genetics. If you have the genetics to develop cancer, you will regardless of what you put in your mouth. If you are Caucasian, spend too much time in the sun without protection, you can develop skin cancer regardless of being a vegan. If you are woman and have contracted HPV, you could develop cervical cancer regardless of being vegan.

You can be a man who eats vegan and still develop testicular cancer for no reason at all.

Being vegan isn't going to change genetics and the fact that you may be predetermined to develop cancer.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-05-2018, 04:48 PM
 
Location: Middle of the ocean
28,466 posts, read 18,062,104 times
Reputation: 41001
How Diet Can Change Your DNA
Recent studies suggest that the food you eat could modify your genes and potentially your children’s

https://www.scientificamerican.com/p...ange-your-dna/


Feed your genes: How our genes respond to the foods we eat

https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0919073845.htm
__________________
____________________________________________
My posts as a Mod will always be in red.
Be sure to review Terms of Service: TOS
And check this out: FAQ
Moderator: Relationships Forum / Hawaii Forum / Dogs
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-05-2018, 06:36 PM
 
18,441 posts, read 10,091,989 times
Reputation: 18061
Quote:
Originally Posted by NasalPolyps View Post
You can be a man who eats vegan and still develop testicular cancer for no reason at all.

Being vegan isn't going to change genetics and the fact that you may be predetermined to develop cancer.
If you're a man and being vegan causes you to live longer, then you're going to get prostate cancer--all men do, if they only live long enough.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Central IL
13,723 posts, read 7,372,039 times
Reputation: 31792
Quote:
Originally Posted by NasalPolyps View Post
https://www.newsweek.com/vegan-youtu...disease-815021


https://veganhealth.org/cancer-rates-of-vegetarians/


https://www.researchgate.net/blog/po...-heart-disease


The point is that not eating meat, isn't going to change genetics. If you have the genetics to develop cancer, you will regardless of what you put in your mouth. If you are Caucasian, spend too much time in the sun without protection, you can develop skin cancer regardless of being a vegan. If you are woman and have contracted HPV, you could develop cervical cancer regardless of being vegan.

You can be a man who eats vegan and still develop testicular cancer for no reason at all.

Being vegan isn't going to change genetics and the fact that you may be predetermined to develop cancer.
Both veg's and non-veg's develop "many" cancers - the question is whether there is a statistically significant difference between them, hopefully after controlling for other factors.

Your first link is some weird anecdotal case - I don't get it at all.

Your second link - pretty difficult to follow but do you understand that it is a list of running results/analyses from the same longitudinal study?

Taken at face value, here are the the recent results:
EPIC-Oxford: Cancer Mortality (2015)
In the 2015 paper from EPIC-Oxford (19), there was no difference in all cancer mortality between vegetarians (including vegans) and regular meat-eaters (0.93, 0.82-1.05). Vegetarians had lower rates of death from pancreatic (0.48, 0.28-0.82) and lymphatic (0.50, 0.32-0.79), but not colorectal, lung, breast, or ovary cancers.

After excluding participants who changed diet categories during the study, vegetarians had a lower risk of all cancer (0.82, 0.72-0.94), and similar findings as above for the other cancers.

Vegans suffered from 67 deaths from cancer, with a rate not significantly different from regular meat-eaters (1.14, 0.88-1.47).

General Cancer
Table 1 shows that the 2014 study from EPIC-Oxford is the first to show vegetarians to have a lower cancer rate than non-vegetarians (not including pesco-vegetarians). It took 14.9 years of follow-up before a statistically significant difference developed.



Your third link talks about a single genetic variant called "rs66698963" - the article may have theoretical value but there are MILLIONS of genetic variants all interacting with each other, your diet, environment, etc. - so I'll not be too concerned about this single finding.


Diet doesn't change genetics but whether you actually get, exhibit, or die from cancer is impacted by diet and environment. Obviously some cancers never grow enough to be found, much less to affect your health or kill you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 09:01 AM
 
Location: Early America
1,520 posts, read 716,780 times
Reputation: 3231
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikala43 View Post
How Diet Can Change Your DNA
Recent studies suggest that the food you eat could modify your genes and potentially your children’s

https://www.scientificamerican.com/p...ange-your-dna/


Epigenetics. Everything we do and consume alters our genetic expressions, but doesn't change DNA sequence. Yes, offspring too.

Quote:

Feed your genes: How our genes respond to the foods we eat

https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0919073845.htm
They recommend traditional foods. Catherine Shanahan, MD first published this book 10 years ago Deep Nutrition: Why Your Genes Need Traditional Foods. https://www.amazon.com/Deep-Nutritio.../dp/1250113822 This book serves as a good and interesting introduction into the Epigenetics field of science.


This is what I think is largely ignored by almost everyone it seems: Many Americans have DNA from two or more cultures/regions with different traditional diets. So what are their traditional foods? I think everyone has to experiment. The cultural/regional DNA with the highest percentage is a logical diet to begin experimenting.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 09:33 AM
 
Location: Middle of the ocean
28,466 posts, read 18,062,104 times
Reputation: 41001
Quote:
Originally Posted by SimplySagacious View Post
Epigenetics. Everything we do and consume alters our genetic expressions, but doesn't change DNA sequence. Yes, offspring too.

They recommend traditional foods. Catherine Shanahan, MD first published this book 10 years ago Deep Nutrition: Why Your Genes Need Traditional Foods. https://www.amazon.com/Deep-Nutritio.../dp/1250113822 This book serves as a good and interesting introduction into the Epigenetics field of science.


This is what I think is largely ignored by almost everyone it seems: Many Americans have DNA from two or more cultures/regions with different traditional diets. So what are their traditional foods? I think everyone has to experiment. The cultural/regional DNA with the highest percentage is a logical diet to begin experimenting.

I think there is some truth in food affecting gene expression, or that it can.... I hated the book Deep Nutrition, it had some leaps that seemed completely unscientific to me.

Even Price Weston (whom she raves about) said she was off base with her conclusions.

But I think the area of study is interesting.
__________________
____________________________________________
My posts as a Mod will always be in red.
Be sure to review Terms of Service: TOS
And check this out: FAQ
Moderator: Relationships Forum / Hawaii Forum / Dogs
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 10:03 AM
 
Location: Early America
1,520 posts, read 716,780 times
Reputation: 3231
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikala43 View Post
I think there is some truth in food affecting gene expression, or that it can.... I hated the book Deep Nutrition, it had some leaps that seemed completely unscientific to me.

Even Price Weston (whom she raves about) said she was off base with her conclusions.

But I think the area of study is interesting.

The articles you linked to support her conclusions. I mentioned that she published 10 years ago because advances have been made since then. There is no doubt that diet alters gene expressions. It's not the only epigenetic factor but it's the one for which individuals have the most control.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 10:04 AM
 
Location: Middle of the ocean
28,466 posts, read 18,062,104 times
Reputation: 41001
Quote:
Originally Posted by SimplySagacious View Post
The articles you linked to support her conclusions. I mentioned that she published 10 years ago because advances have been made since then. There is no doubt that diet alters gene expressions. It's not the only epigenetic factor but it's the one for which individuals have the most control.
She went way too far IMO.
__________________
____________________________________________
My posts as a Mod will always be in red.
Be sure to review Terms of Service: TOS
And check this out: FAQ
Moderator: Relationships Forum / Hawaii Forum / Dogs
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 03:07 PM
 
Location: Raleigh
7,214 posts, read 5,353,871 times
Reputation: 9855
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
So do vegetarians who started eating that way as adults not just because it's cool but either because of health reasons, a conscientiousness about consuming animals, or a combination thereof. I like all of those things you mentioned that I bolded.
I think it's more about being raised in cultures that eat a lot of those things, and don't eat meat, and furthermore don't look for "Hacks" or ways to have what they used to have when they ate meat.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mainebrokerman View Post
id say yes overall.....but only because of the health conscious bias...how many vegans are smokers???

how many are 100lbs overweight and eat tons of sugars?
My thoughts as well^^

They also (broadly at least) trend towards female, active, young...
How many Vegans are smoking cigs and drinking Old Fashioned's in the tavern all night? Not tons.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 08:48 AM
 
875 posts, read 209,290 times
Reputation: 2268
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikala43 View Post
How Diet Can Change Your DNA
Recent studies suggest that the food you eat could modify your genes and potentially your children’s

https://www.scientificamerican.com/p...ange-your-dna/


Feed your genes: How our genes respond to the foods we eat

https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0919073845.htm


To clarify, even though the title implies the DNA is changed (clickbait almost) its actually epigenetics. In brief, your genes do not change, your diet does not change your genes (to be technical, its methylation of the DNA that changes, not the DNA sequence itself). But there is speculation that diet can alter gene expression (i.e. when the gene is read and turned into a protein - that may be switched off or upregulated etc). Its still actually pretty speculative and is currently being oversold. Way more results are needed, but the research is being done.


Overall for most major pathologies vegetarianism shows positive effects (although whether it will work for any one individual still largely comes down to genes). However, multiple studies have shown poorer mental health correlates with vegan/vegetarianism. Its not clear if its causative (if it is I would guess its partially a lipid/fats issue) or merely correlative. However, studies that have tried to correct as much as possible for other factors suggest its slightly causative.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Health and Wellness
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top