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Old 12-07-2018, 09:28 AM
 
Location: Middle of the ocean
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Originally Posted by Chint View Post
To clarify, even though the title implies the DNA is changed (clickbait almost) its actually epigenetics. In brief, your genes do not change, your diet does not change your genes (to be technical, its methylation of the DNA that changes, not the DNA sequence itself). But there is speculation that diet can alter gene expression (i.e. when the gene is read and turned into a protein - that may be switched off or upregulated etc). Its still actually pretty speculative and is currently being oversold. Way more results are needed, but the research is being done.


Overall for most major pathologies vegetarianism shows positive effects (although whether it will work for any one individual still largely comes down to genes). However, multiple studies have shown poorer mental health correlates with vegan/vegetarianism. Its not clear if its causative (if it is I would guess its partially a lipid/fats issue) or merely correlative. However, studies that have tried to correct as much as possible for other factors suggest its slightly causative.

I agree, though I've never seen the poorer mental health study or anything about it (no arguing with, just haven't seen it).

I do not know a lot about DNA and all that, and I don't think you can change your DNA, but I do think food can affect the expression of it, like you could have a gene for cancer, but stop it from "turning on" with diet. Sometimes. Maybe. Not always.

Due to my lack of knowledge I suppose it is a belief, rather than an informed opinion at this point.
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Old 12-07-2018, 10:55 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Mikala43 View Post
I agree, though I've never seen the poorer mental health study or anything about it (no arguing with, just haven't seen it).

I do not know a lot about DNA and all that, and I don't think you can change your DNA, but I do think food can affect the expression of it, like you could have a gene for cancer, but stop it from "turning on" with diet. Sometimes. Maybe. Not always.

Due to my lack of knowledge I suppose it is a belief, rather than an informed opinion at this point.
That's about right.




here are some research papers re. vegetarianism and mental health:
https://www.researchgate.net/profile...d258000000.pdf


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28777971


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22676203


There's also a large German study that I can't find at present. There also will doubtless be some studies showing mental health is unaffected, not linked, or is beneficial. However, the overall indication based on the present literature is that there is a negative effect or at least a correlation (of course these are group studies, and cannot be extrapolated to any one individual)


Since being vegetarian or vegan is clearly more on the correct side of the PC fence nowadays there are people who will be dogmatic and insist "the studies are flawed" - yet they will not apply exactly the same analysis (all scientific studies are imperfect and flawed) to those studies showing lower physical (non-mental) disease incidence in vegetarians versus meat-eaters. You have to take both over-stated excuses and proclamations with a grain of salt.


As good for the environment, and animals, that veganism and vegetarianism is, there may be some limited deleterious effects for humans (even if the holistic or overall benefit to them is positive). But then again, everything is pretty much a comprise.
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Old Today, 12:36 PM
 
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Originally Posted by LittleDolphin View Post
Do you have any personal experience in switching from being an omnivore to a vegan or vegetarian diet and found your health improved?

Of course, there is unhealthy vegetarian eating, too. My cousin is a vegetarian and eats a whole lot of ice cream daily and is overweight and has some health issues. But is he the exception rather than the rule?

I think so.

Other vegetarians I know are quite slender and seem fit.
I don't know if vegetarians are healthier than non-veggies, generally. I'm sure there are stats on that. Also, there is a range of non-vegetarianism and vegetarianism.

But...I gave up all meat except poultry about 15 yrs ago, I think? Maybe longer. A long time. Yes, I got healthier. That has only gotten more noticeable, as the years have gone by. I'm 65, now. As others get diabetes, obese, high cholesterol, or high blood pressure, or whatever, I have not. My blood work was normal decades ago, and it is still normal. I'm the same size. I have mild osteoarthritis...it is about the same as it was years ago, although it is a progressive disease. I was diagnosed with it before I gave up meats.

Like I said, I am a semi-vegetarian. I do eat poultry. But I tend to eat skinless chicken breasts, with only occasional chicken with skin on or fried. By occasional, I mean once every two or three months.

I think it may also be a whole way of eating, and not just not eating meat. Not many processed foods. Eating fruits and veggies every day. Beans. Whole grains instead of white foods. That sort of thing. BTW, I eat that way mainly because that happens to be what I like. I feel bad if I eat a lot of processed foods or heavy foods, high fat, a lot of white foods like taters, etc. And I naturally eat a diet that is either low in sodium or at least not high. I also tend to eat not enough fat, so I have to watch that.

I will say that it has now been shown that some cuts of beef, and maybe other meats, cause cancer.

If a person gives up meats, I think s/he needs to make sure he gets enough of the right kind of protein from other sources. And I mean, keep count for a few days every now and then, to make sure.

But for some, it's not how long you live, it's the enjoyment they get out of living, as long as they're here. To each his own. I gave up meats for ethical, not health, reasons. So the health advantages are perks. Keeping sodium intake low is very important, IMO.

Last edited by bpollen; Today at 02:06 PM..
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