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Old 01-02-2019, 04:21 PM
 
Location: Brawndo-Thirst-Mutilator-Nation
15,889 posts, read 15,882,521 times
Reputation: 11817

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I am posting a link and snippet to an interesting article that is germain to this thread.

I am in no way trying to encourage/discourage anyone from having knee-replacement surgery......just putting this article up as a something that may give whomever reads it a different perspective on the issue: https://www.nbcnews.com/health/aging...regret-n953931

Research suggests that up to one-third of those who have knees replaced continue to experience chronic pain, while 1 in 5 are dissatisfied with the results. A study published in 2017 in the BMJ found that knee replacement had “minimal effects on quality of life,” especially for patients with less severe arthritis.
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Old 01-02-2019, 04:41 PM
 
Location: Northern VA
458 posts, read 573,306 times
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Tickyul, I appreciate this and your previous comments (although I don't remember you sharing what changes you've made to avoid TKR). Nightlysparrow already posted the same article in thread #10. I understand that their are risks with any surgical procedure. The article is interesting, but I prefer to look at the positive side of things - while one-third may continue to experience chronic pain, that means that two-thirds don't. And while 20% are dissatisfied, that means that 80% are satisfied. If it comes to the point that I actually need one, I'll be hopeful that I fall into the overwhelmingly positive results for the majority.
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Old 01-02-2019, 04:46 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
22,167 posts, read 27,107,494 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by djplourd View Post
Tickyul, I appreciate this and your previous comments (although I don't remember you sharing what changes you've made to avoid TKR). Nightlysparrow already posted the same article in thread #10. I understand that their are risks with any surgical procedure. The article is interesting, but I prefer to look at the positive side of things - while one-third may continue to experience chronic pain, that means that two-thirds don't. And while 20% are dissatisfied, that means that 80% are satisfied. If it comes to the point that I actually need one, I'll be hopeful that I fall into the overwhelmingly positive results for the majority.
The interesting thing is that satisfaction with joint replacement strongly correlates with the patient's pre-op expectations for the benefits of the surgery. Those who expect more than the surgery can deliver are likely to be disappointed.
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Old 01-02-2019, 05:55 PM
 
Location: Brawndo-Thirst-Mutilator-Nation
15,889 posts, read 15,882,521 times
Reputation: 11817
Quote:
Originally Posted by djplourd View Post
Tickyul, I appreciate this and your previous comments (although I don't remember you sharing what changes you've made to avoid TKR). Nightlysparrow already posted the same article in thread #10. I understand that their are risks with any surgical procedure. The article is interesting, but I prefer to look at the positive side of things - while one-third may continue to experience chronic pain, that means that two-thirds don't. And while 20% are dissatisfied, that means that 80% are satisfied. If it comes to the point that I actually need one, I'll be hopeful that I fall into the overwhelmingly positive results for the majority.


Thanks, maybe someone will take a fresh look at the article-link that I insanely reposted!

You have a good attitude, I think that will go a long way in whatever your choice is with
regards to your knee-issues.
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Old 01-02-2019, 06:41 PM
 
Location: Southern California
21,213 posts, read 7,154,719 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tickyul View Post
Thanks, maybe someone will take a fresh look at the article-link that I insanely reposted!

You have a good attitude, I think that will go a long way in whatever your choice is with
regards to your knee-issues.
It's very similar or about the same as link in 10 above.

I have this discussion going on another group and a person from the UK posted that they won't do them there unless Serious Pain, claiming too many failures.

Talking to a friend this morning from back East, she went for her first ortho consult and she's 81 and her knees are starting to make a lot of noise, but she can bend and walk and still works out at gym...first thing out of ortho's mouth after viewing xrays was "you need two knee replacements"...she said no way, what are my options, she ended up getting cortisone for now, but will I Hope see a Prolo MD that I sent her info on...
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Old 01-03-2019, 11:35 AM
 
12,721 posts, read 14,993,273 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by djplourd View Post
I understand that their are risks with any surgical procedure. I prefer to look at the positive side of things - while one-third may continue to experience chronic pain, that means that two-thirds don't. And while 20% are dissatisfied, that means that 80% are satisfied. If it comes to the point that I actually need one, I'll be hopeful that I fall into the overwhelmingly positive results for the majority.
Good way to think....I've had back surgeries and may need more. People may not understand why I risk it, but the risk has been worth it every time.

It's easy (I found )to be positive about a surgery when nothing else is helping and you really desire an improvement in your life, (maybe the chance to move more freely without pain) and that surgery offers it.

It's like you said...you weigh the pro's and con's...look at the statistics, read some testimonials...basically research and then decide if the risk is worth it to you.
It also makes it easier to have the surgery when you know that pretty well every surgery carries a risk.

I think that if you are a very health conscious person and take care of yourself, surgery is less risky as well.
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Old 01-03-2019, 12:00 PM
 
Location: Northern VA
458 posts, read 573,306 times
Reputation: 546
Quote:
Originally Posted by purehuman View Post
Good way to think....I've had back surgeries and may need more. People may not understand why I risk it, but the risk has been worth it every time.

It's easy (I found )to be positive about a surgery when nothing else is helping and you really desire an improvement in your life, (maybe the chance to move more freely without pain) and that surgery offers it.

It's like you said...you weigh the pro's and con's...look at the statistics, read some testimonials...basically research and then decide if the risk is worth it to you.
It also makes it easier to have the surgery when you know that pretty well every surgery carries a risk.

I think that if you are a very health conscious person and take care of yourself, surgery is less risky as well.
I just got home from a follow up with my neurosurgeon. I had a bilateral RF Ablation in November that only helped for about a week. I'm getting a referral to a neurosurgeon back specialist. If he recommends surgery, it will probably be a complex, multi-facet fusion procedure. However, my neurosurgeopn doesn't think I'm in enough pain at this point for such a complex procedure. I still want the consult with the specialist to get his opinion first.

I'm more concerned now about this possible back surgery than I am about a simple TKR.
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Old 01-04-2019, 05:09 PM
 
Location: Maryland
444 posts, read 906,418 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by djplourd View Post
Right now I'm still recovering from my second left knee surgery in less than a year and a half.

The first surgery was in June 2017. The initial diagnosis was a medial meniscus tear (based on an MRI). During the surgery they discovered a tear in the lateral meniscus as well. The MRI also showed mucoid degeneration of the ACL. They looked at the ACL during the surgery but said it was ok. They also diagnised me as having some grade 1 chondromalacia of the patella and some grade 1 chondromalacia of the trochlea, as well as some grade 2 chondromalacia of the femoral condyle.

Fast forward to this year. My left knee started bothering me again in February/March. I tried cortisone and synvisc injections but nothing helped. Another MRI in September showed tears in the medial and lateral menisci again. The specific diagnosis from the MRI was:
  • Complex nondisplaced tear at the junction of the posterior horn and body of the medial meniscus
  • Nondisplaced tear involving the anterior horn of the lateral meniscus near its root attachment.
  • Mild tricompartmental chondromalacia with small focal high-grade chondral defect at the medial patellar facet with small underlying subchondral cyst.
  • Mild to moderate joint effusion.
  • Moderate to severe mucoid degeneration of the ACL fibers which otherwise intact.

The second surgery was in October. Along with fixing the menisci tears, this time they also debrided the ACL. The surgical findings were:
  • Plica suprapatella pouch
  • Grade 3 chondromalacia of the lateral patellar facet
  • Grade 3 chondromalacia of the trochlea
  • Degenerative fraying of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus.
  • Degenerative fraying of anterior horn of medial meniscus
  • Degenerative fraying of anterior horn of lateral meniscus

The recovery from the second surgery has been harder than the first. After the first surgery the knee felt stiff for a while but it didn't really hurt anymore. After he second surgery it was still swollen and painful until the last couple of weeks. It still bothers me occasionally but it has gotten better.

I've been told by an orthopedic surgeon and a physical therapist that eventually I'll need a knee replacement. I'm not there yet, but the rapid deterioration of my knee makes me think that it will need to happen sooner rather than later. I've read most of the threads on TKR, along with searching the web, and I'm ok with it if its likely to help. So here's the question: when did you (or your doctor) decide that enough was enough and it was time for the TKR?
I've had partial knee replacement in both knees. How will you know when you need a full or partial replacement? Easy, when you can't walk to the corner of your block without intense pain, you're ready for a replacement.
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Old 01-04-2019, 05:30 PM
 
Location: Southern California
21,213 posts, read 7,154,719 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seethelight View Post
I've had partial knee replacement in both knees. How will you know when you need a full or partial replacement? Easy, when you can't walk to the corner of your block without intense pain, you're ready for a replacement.
So what does the partial do if one ends up with total down the road. Sounds like a lot of waste and expense if the total is the ultimate anyway!!!
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Old 01-04-2019, 05:35 PM
 
185 posts, read 124,730 times
Reputation: 806
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaminhealth View Post
So what does the partial do if one ends up with total down the road.
My partial was in for 14 months and never did feel right. Pain all the time. Doc said to wait, it takes time. Finally went to a different surgeon, he took the partial out and put in a total. 12 months post op it feels like a new knee. Never felt better.
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