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Old 01-02-2019, 04:48 AM
 
Location: northern New England
1,944 posts, read 807,204 times
Reputation: 7538

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Quote:
Originally Posted by coolgato View Post
People can't bring their meds from home when they go to the hospital. I couldn't understand why though, but you can't. The nurses dole out the meds as prescribed by the doctors. The nurses get orders to administer, but you could always ask questions, then they will call the doctor with your concerns and get back to you.
It's because they would require the hospital pharmacist to personally verify each pill as to what it is.
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Old 01-02-2019, 08:19 AM
 
Location: TX/ Maryland
261 posts, read 52,044 times
Reputation: 455
Supposed to be the nurses. They don't let you keep your own meds so the nurses need to remember to bring them to you. Frustrating when the nurses FORGET and you have to remind them.

When I had my second baby, I had medicine I needed to take and on my last 2 nights in the hosp, this particular dingbat nurse kept forgetting. A half hour would go by! So I'd have to remind this lady every darn time.
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Old 01-02-2019, 08:21 AM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
20,067 posts, read 4,258,603 times
Reputation: 25370
Quote:
Originally Posted by VTsnowbird View Post
It's because they would require the hospital pharmacist to personally verify each pill as to what it is.
Yes.

Hospitals WILL NOT USE YOUR MEDS BROUGHT FROM HOME. They will only use hospital dispensed meds. Several reasons...they have no control over what you bring in, legal ramifications, etc.

You bring your meds only for the staff to verify and confirm what your actual regimen is....

then, as per the MD, your usual meds will be prescribed to be given to you unless there is a contraindication with your current medical situation.
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Old 01-02-2019, 09:54 AM
 
742 posts, read 640,605 times
Reputation: 1142
I am an RN retired 15 years.


It is up to you to tell your doctor upon admittance to the hospital what you are taking- including over the counter and vitamins, etc. Even things like Tylenol, aspirin, protein shakes, etc that you take once in a while as needed. If it is not food- tell them. There are NO medications or supplements/ vitamins that do not have side effects. Including:


aspirin-

*Stroke caused by a burst blood vessel. While daily aspirin can help prevent a clot-related stroke, it may increase your risk of a bleeding stroke (hemorrhagic stroke)...
  • Gastrointestinal bleeding. ...
  • Allergic reaction...
  • increased bleeding....
  • plus more:
  • Tylenol-
  • nausea....
  • stomach pain.....
  • loss of appetite.....
  • itching.....
  • rash.....
  • headache....
  • dark urine....
  • clay-colored stools.....
  • liver damage,
  • and iron-
<li class="TrT0Xe">chronic fatigue...<li class="TrT0Xe">joint pain....<li class="TrT0Xe">abdominal pain.....<li class="TrT0Xe">liver disease (cirrhosis, liver cancer).....<li class="TrT0Xe">diabetes mellitus.....<li class="TrT0Xe">irregular heart rhythm....<li class="TrT0Xe">heart attack or heart failure....<li class="TrT0Xe">skin color changes (bronze, ashen-gray green).....

These are just an example....there are literally thousand of meds and vitamins with side effects, or have side effects when combined.


Then the admitting doctor will order, or discontinue all those items, or order different meds/ doses, depending on results of bloodwork, tests, and how you are doing while taking those meds, or even what test/ treatments/ surgeries are TO BE ordered. When my husband needed back surgery, he had to stop some medications and all vitamins, 1 week prior to surgery because they could cause increased bleeding. Some vitamins interfere with antidepressants, for an example.


Many times, most doctors do not like or believe in vitamins, etc and may stop them. Other doctors only like the "approved" or common vitamins, like Vit D, Vit C, Iron, etc. They may also stop vitamins or some forms of medications because they can INTERFERE with accurate test results, but may restart them after the tests or after discharge.


Some hospitals may not have some things you are taking, especially vitamins/ supplements, or your insurance will not PAY for a specific medication.


When in doubt or have a question, ask your doctor. NEVER bring meds with you to the hospital. They will send them home with anyone who comes with you. If you take a vitamin or medication and you are not getting it- ask why. They could have forgotten to order it or there may be a reason you are NOT getting it- temporarily or permanently.


NEVER have someone else bring in medication/ vitamins/ supplements, etc from home and take them. It's a good way to kill yourself- if the doctor doesn't know what you are taking- even aspirin or Tylenol, or a multivitamin, can interact with what the doctor is ordering....


Write on a piece of paper each medication name (common name and generic name) the strength of the medication (5 mg, 100 IU ,etc), how many are ordered (1/2 tablet, 2 capsules, 1 to 2 tablets/ capsules, etc), how often (daily, every other day, twice daily, as needed, etc), and how often YOU take them. Keep it on you.


Change the list when meds are changed....This way, even in an emergency, you have a list of current meds and vitamins. If kept in your wallet or handbag, etc you will have it on you even if brought in by ambulance unconscious thru the ER. Let your contact person (spouse, sibling, best friend, etc) know where it is kept.
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Old 01-02-2019, 10:20 AM
 
Location: colorado springs, CO
4,289 posts, read 1,932,754 times
Reputation: 14850
Quote:
Originally Posted by user-3489_j65 View Post
Who has the the responsibility to be sure a patient is being administered all the medications they were taking prior to their hospitalization during their stay (assuming none of them were being temporarily or permanently stopped during their stay)? Thanks.
The doctor must include medication orders along with the admit order. The orders can be taken by phone by an RN, written in the chart by the doctor on the hospital floor, or brought with the patient from the doctors office. A unit clerk puts the orders into the hospital pharmacy who dispenses them to the floor.

The orders must be signed off on by an RN. If a patient is scheduled for surgery & is not allowed to eat or drink, some meds may be ordered “with sips of water”. Some meds may be put on hold for surgery; such as blood thinners & others may be ordered by injection or IV.

If you notice a med is missing, your first person to ask is the nurse, unless the doctor just coincidentally happens to be there on the floor. Doctors are usually required to round on patients once a day but the nurse can call to clarify an order over the phone at any time.

If you ask in the middle of the night about a medication taken during the day, they will wait until morning to clarify. Unless it is more urgent; such as Insulin for diabetes which may be needed at all hours, of course.

As long as the admitting doctor has the current medications list, everything should transition smoothly but sometimes, especially if a patient sees a specialist or has multiple doctors; it can take a few calls to get everything squared away.
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Old 01-02-2019, 10:48 AM
 
Location: Dallas TX
14,586 posts, read 20,943,228 times
Reputation: 20990
From what you are writing I think you are misunderstanding the discharge forms. They are including what was done for the patient during the hospital stay, and what medications were administered. Depending on the EMR/EHR that is being used, if the patient has been at that hospital for other stays, the other medications a patient takes will not be included.
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Old 01-02-2019, 11:42 AM
 
Location: planet earth
3,663 posts, read 1,293,691 times
Reputation: 8061
Quote:
Originally Posted by user-3489_j65 View Post
Who has the the responsibility to be sure a patient is being administered all the medications they were taking prior to their hospitalization during their stay (assuming none of them were being temporarily or permanently stopped during their stay)? Thanks.
This is a very smart question.

Hospitals are so disorganized, that the patient's life could be in peril, just from not getting their "regular" medications.

I prepared a list of all my father's medications, but still - he was in E.R. for hours and hours and then admitted - went into diabetic shock just because they didn't even think to give him a sandwich (you know they don't feed or water you in E.R.) . . . no one ever inquired about medications and when I gave them the list, they didn't seem particularly interested, so who knows what medications they administered.
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Old 01-02-2019, 11:52 AM
 
8,237 posts, read 5,662,761 times
Reputation: 15336
Quote:
Originally Posted by user-3489_j65 View Post
OK, but if the discharge form only lists 3 of the 6 medications is the "normal" assumption that the discharge form is inaccurate?
The "normal" assumption is to check with YOUR doctor.

The ultimate responsibility lies with you.

Always carry a list of ALL MEDS, prescribed and OTC, and check with nurses, hospitalists and (if necessary) hospital pharmacy

If you are incapacitated, make sure you have a family advocate with you to ask questions.
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Old 01-02-2019, 12:15 PM
 
Location: Ft. Myers
16,618 posts, read 10,199,297 times
Reputation: 35957
Quote:
Originally Posted by user-3489_j65 View Post
Who has the the responsibility to be sure a patient is being administered all the medications they were taking prior to their hospitalization during their stay (assuming none of them were being temporarily or permanently stopped during their stay)? Thanks.

Ultimately, YOU have the responsibility to make sure you are getting the proper meds. YOU are an adult, YOU know what you normally take, and the hospital staff are not mind readers.

I was recently hospitalized for heart surgery, and I made sure they knew what I had been taking before I was a patient, and I made sure I was getting those, and also the new meds they put me on.

Yes, the staff has to be diligent, but the ultimate responsibility falls on you and me.
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Old 01-02-2019, 01:33 PM
Status: "Welcome Governor Polis!" (set 2 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,682 posts, read 100,108,712 times
Reputation: 32139
The answer to the title question is "the hospital". To answer the question in the OP, the patient is asked what meds s/he is taking, and these are recorded on the EHR. (I think the vast, vast majority of hospitals use EHR now. If they're not using EHR, it still gets recorded on paper.) It's up to the patient to be accurate with this list of meds. Patients may take meds prescribed by more than one doctor.

I am a spouse of a patient who has had some frequent hospitalizations recently, is in the hospital now as a matter of fact. We have never been asked to bring in meds from home; we have been asked to bring a list.

As a retired RN, I agree with countrykaren about not bringing in meds or having someone else bring them in. If you need something the hospital pharmacy does not stock, they can get it from some other pharmacy. This happened to my husband in a recent hospitalization. The only exception to this would be if you were asked to bring something in, but I frankly have never heard of that.

coschristi gave a good description of the process.
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