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Old 01-07-2019, 01:57 PM
 
Location: Wine Country
4,978 posts, read 6,055,580 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emotiioo View Post
Very sad. But I think its really true of a lot of addicts-- they die young or younger. It is unusual to have someone with the level of problems that my relatives have who are around into their late 60s. Usually they have killed themselves in an accident or overdose.
My friend was 50 when she died.
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Old 01-07-2019, 06:00 PM
 
Location: Haiku
3,227 posts, read 2,258,232 times
Reputation: 4883
You cannot help someone who does not want to be helped - any professional will say that. It is a waste of time for all. So really your key is to convince the person he/she needs help. I have no idea there - take a video of him nodding off or slurring or being obviously stoned and confront him?

Once you convince the person, there are tons of professionals available. I would just Google what is in your area. They no doubt have seen it all, so they will know what options would work for senior citizen substance abusers.

But I will suggest that even if the person won't get help, it is important to not let him hurt others. I would go so far as to suggest that you tell him that you will call the police if he tries to get behind the wheel while high on drugs and/or booze.
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Old 01-08-2019, 09:47 AM
 
5,510 posts, read 3,172,664 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaminhealth View Post
Treatment is out there BUT the addict has to be ready and willing to go.
Here's some good news, jaminhealth. Almost no one who enters treatment really wants to be there. Few believe they can live without their chemical of choice. The ones who want treatment usually want to be rid of the problems associated with using not the using itself.

Studies have been done that show that the recovery rate for people who want to go to treatment vs. those who are forcibly placed there is about the same. So it turns out that the old idea that they have to want to go is a myth. You can check this out by researching. Some of the best research has been done by Hazelden.

You mentioned the reason yourself - their minds are not clear. Once they have experienced a period of time detoxing their bodies and minds in an atmosphere of sobriety many of them begin to look at their problem in a more rational way.

To the OP - I wish we had more treatment resources just for the elderly. Being treated with young meth addicts is certainly a special kind of torture for them. Addiction has the same nature in both but life styles and behaviors are often quite different.

I would suggest looking for long-term treatment - the kind some half-way houses offer. It's less intensive and also more supportive for a longer period of time.

There are also "wet houses" where some people who appear intractable live. Here they may use, generally infrequently with a limited income, and still have a medical and emotional support system to tend them.
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Old 01-08-2019, 12:03 PM
 
Location: Southern California
20,531 posts, read 6,834,413 times
Reputation: 13820
Oh I've seen both in my family, a younger person go into a 13 month rehab to save her life and be able to raise her children and get her life back, vicodin took her life for too many yrs. And a 95 yr old who drank two weeks before he died.

I'm certainly happy that those AA rooms are full.
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Old 01-08-2019, 12:09 PM
 
Location: planet earth
3,663 posts, read 1,298,910 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emotiioo View Post
I am sorry, but I have to disagree-- age is an issue. There have been decades of use and a lifetime of habits built up to continue to use. The brain of a teen or even young adult has not developed fully, where that of a 60 year old is definitely fully formed. Decision making may be different. And, get an addict in their 70s and you may start to have difficulty discerning between dementia and behavior while using. There are many differences, and though some might bristle that an older addict needs different handling than a teen and see it as some sort of discrimination, its clear that what works for many younger people has never worked for them, thus the repetition of the habit into late life.
I see what you are saying. Yes, in a perfect world, there would be rehabs for different age groups - I am sure you can find a rehab for old addicts - the rehabs are money making models so that is a good niche. It will probably be pricey, but if money is not an issue, I am sure you can find something specific for elder addiction.

I was just sharing that the Salvation Army and a Christian long term rehab does accommodate people of age - I don't know if they treat them any differently - I would imagine if they have case-workers, the worker would have to take their age into account.
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Old 01-09-2019, 02:45 PM
 
5,510 posts, read 3,172,664 times
Reputation: 19010
The Sal works miracles. Different people have different needs in recovery. But whatever they are that hole in the soul that's left when a person quits using needs to be filled.

Sometimes it's as easy as a job and companionship and the Sal does a good job at that. And there's that added spiritual aspect for those who want it.

I used to know a gruff old recovering alcoholic who ran a shingling business. He'd give any alcoholic a job and took good care of them. Only requirement was staying sober.

Those guys stayed up on a roof all day long hearing the AA message. LOL No treatment - just a job and lots of positive thinking. To have someone who believed in them after years of failure helped a lot, I think.

You couldn't count how many people he helped.
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Old 01-09-2019, 03:20 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
10,976 posts, read 19,380,068 times
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It would be best to find a way to stop them from driving under the influence. Otherwise, it seems like it's their choice. And you don't really know that the veteran isn't experiencing pain. It sounds like you're judging him (pain mysteriously disappears on vacation) and deciding that he doesn't really need meds, something it seems like his doctor disagrees with.

My mother was sure my grandmother was addicted to pain pills and kept begging her to wean herself off of them. Turns out, she needed them to have some quality of life because of pain from osteoporosis and her bones breaking all the time. Once she was off the pain pills, she signed a DNI/DNR and promptly died of pneumonia. I know we hear a lot about the evils of pain meds, but for some people with chronic pain, being able to manage the pain is the only thing that makes life bearable.
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Old 01-10-2019, 10:35 AM
 
1,938 posts, read 963,321 times
Reputation: 4095
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedgehog_Mom View Post
It would be best to find a way to stop them from driving under the influence. Otherwise, it seems like it's their choice. And you don't really know that the veteran isn't experiencing pain. It sounds like you're judging him (pain mysteriously disappears on vacation) and deciding that he doesn't really need meds, something it seems like his doctor disagrees with.

My mother was sure my grandmother was addicted to pain pills and kept begging her to wean herself off of them. Turns out, she needed them to have some quality of life because of pain from osteoporosis and her bones breaking all the time. Once she was off the pain pills, she signed a DNI/DNR and promptly died of pneumonia. I know we hear a lot about the evils of pain meds, but for some people with chronic pain, being able to manage the pain is the only thing that makes life bearable.
The on again off again nature of the veterans pain is a topic for a whole different thread. Suffice to say that it's definitely got a pattern. If things are going well there's none. Take him on a vacation and he's going to jet ski, parasail, do the limbo. As soon as he gets home and someone asks him to do something he doesn't want to? The back is acting up. Difficult conversation with his daughter? He takes so many pills he's out of it for days... nodding off, speaking in nonsequitors, etc. He's been through several doctors who have stopped giving him pills but always finds a new one. He's bought oxy on the street. He's an addict. He behaves like an addict. And he's also been diagnosed with borderline personality disorder. In fact, we aren't even 100% he was ever on active duty military as there's a lot of things that he says that don't make sense with the documents we have found. But again, I could do several threads on his various issues.
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Old Yesterday, 11:29 PM
 
Location: Mostly in my head
19,717 posts, read 54,269,590 times
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The VA has rehab services but the vet has to ask for them. They do inpatient as well as outpatient.
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Old Today, 01:01 PM
 
2,408 posts, read 6,173,722 times
Reputation: 2074
When I went to rehab after triple by pass they could not understand why I refused pain pills,oxy or Percocet,upon discharge I was given prescription for oxy.
After carotid artery surgery I accidently took a oxy pill even though I told them I do not want,BP dropped to 83/30 and upon discharge was given prescription for oxy.I had similar experience a long time ago with hernia operation.
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