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Old Yesterday, 08:21 AM
 
Location: Haiku
3,203 posts, read 2,250,261 times
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Inflammation is your bodies response to harm. The harm can be trauma, like an injury, or the harm can be chemical, like a toxin like or a bug bite. Some viruses trigger an inflammation type response. Or the body can be mis-reading itself and believe there is harm when there isn't, but yet it still reacts. The latter are auto-immune diseases which cause inflammation and it is the inflammatory response that causes a lot of the damage we experience. Classic example of that is Rheumatoid Arthritis.

Inflammation is in the popular literature partly because a lot of diseases we experience can be viewed and treated as chronic inflammation. We can control some types of chronic inflammation, particularly auto-immune issues in the gut, with what we eat. Chronic inflammation is different from acute inflammation in that the inflammation itself starts to harm the body, while acute inflammation is good for us because it is removing harmful agents from the body.

One of the posts above asked about a cold - a cold virus triggers an inflammatory response by the body - leukocytes try to capture and remove the virus. Doing so releases histamines which gives you a runny nose.

Biologically inflammation is a pretty complicated process, there are lots of proteins, hormones, different cells in our immune system, and different organs that play a role in an inflammatory response. But the immune system is almost always involved in any inflammation.
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Old Yesterday, 08:29 AM
 
978 posts, read 234,714 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nobodysbusiness View Post
Inflammation = acidic environment. Health is being on the alkaline side of the PH scale.
Nope. Completely wrong.
OP ignore this answer. Its part of the stay-at-home kitchen health blogger cult nonsense.

Last edited by Chint; Yesterday at 08:55 AM..
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Old Yesterday, 08:34 AM
 
978 posts, read 234,714 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoByFour View Post
Inflammation is your bodies response to harm. The harm can be trauma, like an injury, or the harm can be chemical, like a toxin like or a bug bite. Some viruses trigger an inflammation type response. Or the body can be mis-reading itself and believe there is harm when there isn't, but yet it still reacts. The latter are auto-immune diseases which cause inflammation and it is the inflammatory response that causes a lot of the damage we experience. Classic example of that is Rheumatoid Arthritis.

Inflammation is in the popular literature partly because a lot of diseases we experience can be viewed and treated as chronic inflammation. We can control some types of chronic inflammation, particularly auto-immune issues in the gut, with what we eat. Chronic inflammation is different from acute inflammation in that the inflammation itself starts to harm the body, while acute inflammation is good for us because it is removing harmful agents from the body.

One of the posts above asked about a cold - a cold virus triggers an inflammatory response by the body - leukocytes try to capture and remove the virus. Doing so releases histamines which gives you a runny nose.

Biologically inflammation is a pretty complicated process, there are lots of proteins, hormones, different cells in our immune system, and different organs that play a role in an inflammatory response. But the immune system is almost always involved in any inflammation.
OP - many of the answers here point in the right direction. Inflammation can be very obvious if it is skin based, nasal passages etc. Even when it is a swollen tender area in the body that you can't see but can obviously feel. It is a natural part of the immune response, though over-activation and inappropriate activation of it are, generally, not good. And the bolded part in the post above is basically the reason that blood tests can (by proxy) show inflammation in the body (that can't necessarily otherwise be detected) since the immune mediators - specifically the body chemicals involved the inflammatory pathways - can be measured.


So, on the one hand, it is an actual thing. But on the other hand, as you suspect, it is for sure being over-used.
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Old Yesterday, 08:37 AM
 
978 posts, read 234,714 times
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Originally Posted by nobodysbusiness View Post
There's your problem right there. Getting "factual" information from opinion pieces, then regurgitating it as fact.
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Old Yesterday, 08:52 AM
 
978 posts, read 234,714 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nobodysbusiness View Post
That's a study of actual acidosis in isolated cells. Acidosis isn't simply caused by eating acidic foods. Your body has a million year old homeostatic system for tightly controlling pH in its different compartments at different levels. The H2CO3/CO2 system and molecular buffers control body pH regardless of what you eat or drink. Your stomach is already at pH 2 - incredibly acidic. That's healthy for the stomach. Other parts of the body are tightly regulated also -e.g. blood around 7.35 to 7.45 (on the alkaline side), cerebrospinal fluid at around 7.33 (more acidic than blood).


There's no simple "low pH is bad high pH is good for you" rule - that's simplistic nonsense like thinking there would be one cure for cancer or "artificial is bad natural is good".


Go to an ICU. The patients with the ultimate deadliest form of inflammation - i.e. sepsis - a whole bunch of them have metabolic alkalosis. It doesn't save them.
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Old Yesterday, 09:53 AM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
2,057 posts, read 740,456 times
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Inflammation was defined by Celsus & Galen 1800 yrs ago as the situation where a patient shows Rubor (redness) Calor (heat) Dolor (pain) Tumor (swelling) and Functio Laesa (impaired function)...In modern times, we know that's caused by some insult to tissues that starts the cascade of involvement of the White Blood Cells, including antibodies, cellular action and the secretion of certain destructive enzymes, mediated by complex involvement of chemicals such as prostaglandins, interferon, etc....The "healing process" then involves recruitment of other cells like fibroblasts and the coagulation cascade to make fibrin, to form scars, and also activation of normal cells in the tissue to replace their lost daughters.


We are constantly tearing down and repairing our own tissues even without new insults (injuries). It's like a construction company with a contract to re-model a house-- first they tear down the old stuff and then install the new stuff. When things are working right, there's a balance between the wrecking crew and the construction crew....but things can get out of kilter--- such as auto-immune diseases where the immune system mistakenly identifies normal cells as foreign invaders, or the process of arteriosclerosis where the scar tissue (plaque) can plug up arteries, or scar tissue in injured joints can permanently disrupt function and cause pain.


Quote:
Originally Posted by bell235 View Post

...if I cut out sugar then my blood test will show less of those markers above?

No.


It's difficult to quantitate inflammation-- the WBC is highly variable and unless it's sky high, it's an unreliable, insensitive marker. Same can be said for sed rate or CRP. "Normal levels" of specific antibodies are highly individualized.


It's recently been a fad to talk about "inflammatory index" for foods, but it's quickly falling out of favor as there's little evidence to support it.


Food allergies- where the immune system is activated by food protein-- like tree nuts or peanuts or shell fish etc-- is one thing, but lesser degrees of inflammation caused by foods are either non-existent or too subtle to measure at the present time.
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Old Yesterday, 12:32 PM
 
16,053 posts, read 13,469,699 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bell235 View Post
I feel like it's the latest buzzword but what does it mean? if someone says "this product reduces inflammation" or "going on the keto diet reduces inflammation" what does that even mean?
Inflammation is an immune response at the cellular or tissue level to either infection of injury unless you have an immune disorder.

Inflammation of the gut or digestive tract is usually due to the immune system acting even without the presence of infection or injury, and is what people are typically referring to when they say a diet "reduced inflammation". Inflammation when there is no injury or infection can indicate the immune system is attacking healthy cells in the body and damaging them. When people say they want to reduce inflammation what they are really hoping to do is reduce the damage of the immune system responding when it shouldn't.
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Old Yesterday, 12:39 PM
 
16,053 posts, read 13,469,699 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nobodysbusiness View Post
Inflammation = acidic environment. Health is being on the alkaline side of the PH scale.
Wow. That is patently false. If your stomach wasn't acidic you would die. Humans are much more complicated than the above statement represents.
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Old Yesterday, 12:41 PM
 
16,053 posts, read 13,469,699 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bell235 View Post
Would you consider a head cold "inflammation"? Is that an attack on the immune system?
No, a head cold is a viral infection that causes an immune response. And yes, the resulting inflammation causes many of the symptoms of a cold; i.e. stuffy nose, sinus pain, etc.

The only virus that "attack", per se, the immune system are things like retroviruses.
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Old Yesterday, 01:23 PM
 
Location: Northern panhandle WV
2,630 posts, read 1,895,031 times
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Inflammation is swelling and redness. It can be caused by many things.
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