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Old 01-24-2019, 09:08 PM
 
1,309 posts, read 1,466,481 times
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Good information on ACL tears. I hope the surgery goes well for you.

https://yourmedicalsource.com/acl-te...y-for-acl-tear
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Old 01-24-2019, 10:12 PM
 
Location: Southern California
20,980 posts, read 7,037,856 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve McDonald View Post
A lot depends on whether the ACL was completely or only partially torn. From what you've said, it seems as though only a partial tear was suffered. The blood circulation in the ligament flows from the top to the bottom. If part of the ligament is intact, then blood can continue flowing and it can do some healing on its own. If the tear is complete, it's possible that modern surgery could save the ligament, but it would be much more difficult. It's also important to have surgery done without a long delay, as the ligament will wither without a blood flow.

There is a type of reconstructive surgery for a complete ACL tear, called a patellar transplant. The outer third of the broad patellar tendon (the tendon from the kneecap down to the front of the lower leg bone) is sectioned out at the top and is pulled down around and through the joint and anchored on the back of the upper leg bone. It then serves the same function as the ACL did. After it grows into the leg bone (femur), rehabilitation can begin. The remaining two-thirds of the patellar tendon seems able to continue doing its basic job.

I've known a few people personally who had this surgery and it worked out well for them. Willie Davenport, the Olympic gold medal winner in the 110-meter high-hurdles in 1972, completely torn his ACL a year later and it couldn't be repaired. But he underwent a patellar transplant, became rehabilitated and resumed his training. In a personal triumph and one for orthopedic surgery, in 1976, he won the bronze medal in his event in the Olympics. He said that the medal should go to his surgeon, Dr. Stan James.
This is where PRP could work on the ligament repair. Many athletes have gone and go this route. I'm still considering it.
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Old 01-24-2019, 10:30 PM
 
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More good info:

https://drmillett.com/acl-knee-injur...iate-ligament/
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Old 01-25-2019, 06:30 AM
 
4,820 posts, read 10,719,813 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaminhealth View Post
I've not had this issue but have my own. I have heard from others they can repair on their own and then I've read some require surgery, but expect some down time. You can do a search and read some older threads on ACL issues.

Here is some good info and another option which MAY work.

PRP for ACL Tear
ACL tears DO NOT "repair on their own" and there is NO role for PRP in "repairing" an ACL tear...

When an ACL tears it essentially "explodes" there is ZERO chance of an ACL healing on its own.
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Old 01-25-2019, 06:35 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,454 posts, read 6,631,855 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluedevilz View Post
ACL tears DO NOT "repair on their own" and there is NO role for PRP in "repairing" an ACL tear...

When an ACL tears it essentially "explodes" there is ZERO chance of an ACL healing on its own.

I think that's the description the orthopedic surgeon who replaced my daughter's ACL used to describe the MRI image of what was left of her ACL, "exploded". That and there was what looked like a large gap where it should have been.
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Old 01-25-2019, 06:40 AM
 
4,820 posts, read 10,719,813 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve McDonald View Post
A lot depends on whether the ACL was completely or only partially torn. From what you've said, it seems as though only a partial tear was suffered. The blood circulation in the ligament flows from the top to the bottom. If part of the ligament is intact, then blood can continue flowing and it can do some healing on its own. If the tear is complete, it's possible that modern surgery could save the ligament, but it would be much more difficult. It's also important to have surgery done without a long delay, as the ligament will wither without a blood flow.

There is a type of reconstructive surgery for a complete ACL tear, called a patellar transplant. The outer third of the broad patellar tendon (the tendon from the kneecap down to the front of the lower leg bone) is sectioned out at the top and is pulled down around and through the joint and anchored on the back of the upper leg bone. It then serves the same function as the ACL did. After it grows into the leg bone (femur), rehabilitation can begin. The remaining two-thirds of the patellar tendon seems able to continue doing its basic job.

I've known a few people personally who had this surgery and it worked out well for them. Willie Davenport, the Olympic gold medal winner in the 110-meter high-hurdles in 1972, completely torn his ACL a year later and it couldn't be repaired. But he underwent a patellar transplant, became rehabilitated and resumed his training. In a personal triumph and one for orthopedic surgery, in 1976, he won the bronze medal in his event in the Olympics. He said that the medal should go to his surgeon, Dr. Stan James.
Where do you get that the OP only "partially" tore their ACL??? That isn't what was stated at all...

There is also "no modern surgery to save the ligament" and there is no such thing as "withering" of the residual ligament...

When an ACL tears it "explodes" there is nothing left but strands that is why an ACL can NEVER be repaired with the very, very rare exception when it pulls off with the tibial spine....

I also don't know what you are talking about with a "patellar transplant" because that isn't how a bone patellar bone graft is formed, it isn't the outer third that is taken it is the central third along with a portion of the patella. It isn't pulled "down", it is completely removed and then placed in tunnels from the femur to the tibia. The remaining 2/3 of the patellar tendon are sutured back together.

This is actually the oldest form of ACL repair and has been around for decades. There are other options including hamstring grafts and cadaver grafts as well.

Referencing an athlete from 40 years ago??? This surgery is done every day for high level athletes and today nearly all return to the prior level of competition.
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Old 01-25-2019, 07:11 AM
 
Location: Islip,NY
17,149 posts, read 20,210,722 times
Reputation: 17762
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve McDonald View Post
A lot depends on whether the ACL was completely or only partially torn. From what you've said, it seems as though only a partial tear was suffered. The blood circulation in the ligament flows from the top to the bottom. If part of the ligament is intact, then blood can continue flowing and it can do some healing on its own. If the tear is complete, it's possible that modern surgery could save the ligament, but it would be much more difficult. It's also important to have surgery done without a long delay, as the ligament will wither without a blood flow.

There is a type of reconstructive surgery for a complete ACL tear, called a patellar transplant. The outer third of the broad patellar tendon (the tendon from the kneecap down to the front of the lower leg bone) is sectioned out at the top and is pulled down around and through the joint and anchored on the back of the upper leg bone. It then serves the same function as the ACL did. After it grows into the leg bone (femur), rehabilitation can begin. The remaining two-thirds of the patellar tendon seems able to continue doing its basic job.

I've known a few people personally who had this surgery and it worked out well for them. Willie Davenport, the Olympic gold medal winner in the 110-meter high-hurdles in 1972, completely torn his ACL a year later and it couldn't be repaired. But he underwent a patellar transplant, became rehabilitated and resumed his training. In a personal triumph and one for orthopedic surgery, in 1976, he won the bronze medal in his event in the Olympics. He said that the medal should go to his surgeon, Dr. Stan James.
I will know how bad the tear is on Monday whether partial or full plus the fact I have been walking with the bad knee since December 23rd. It may have gotten worse who knows. I put the brace back on my knee. Lately it's been hurting more and my lower calf aches and I am very stiff. I don't want to be laid up too long.
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Old 01-25-2019, 11:47 AM
 
12,463 posts, read 6,486,248 times
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I’ve had ACL grafts in both knees. My only advice is you want to see an orthopedic surgeon who has signed photos from all the local pro athletes on his wall. I used Zarins at Mass General. He was team physician for the Patriots. You want the guy who does them every day, not the old people knee replacement guy who does a few ACL reconstructions per month.

And do exactly what they say for rehab.
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Old 01-25-2019, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Southern California
20,980 posts, read 7,037,856 times
Reputation: 14073
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluedevilz View Post
ACL tears DO NOT "repair on their own" and there is NO role for PRP in "repairing" an ACL tear...

When an ACL tears it essentially "explodes" there is ZERO chance of an ACL healing on its own.
Not what I've heard from other doctor's mouths. And they do this work and often with success. More and more all the time, plenty of info out there on this and it just boils down to who believes in the work.

https://www.tcpaindoctor.com/prp-injections-acl-tears/

Plenty of athletes for starters and then the whole segment of folks who don't want their knees cut.

Last edited by jaminhealth; 01-25-2019 at 12:10 PM..
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Old 01-25-2019, 02:38 PM
 
Location: SDL/PDX/RDU
4,537 posts, read 2,396,014 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lubby View Post
I fell on 12/23/18 Went to the ER, said it was a sprain, followed up with a great orthopedic Doctor, got an MRI and the results came in that I tore my ACL. I just found out today. Has anyone had this surgery? I have to have it. I go back and see the orthopedist Monday to discuss further. What is recovery time like? I still work and I am 48 Years old and in fairly good health except for this and I have to loose a few pounds which I am working on. Thanks
Yup. Barring any unexpected complications, if all you need is an arthroscopy it's is a pretty straightforward procedure. It will probably be done in a day surgery center. You'll be completely out for around 90 minutes, spend some time in recovery and go home that day.

If you're in relatively good health and physical condition you'll be ambulatory on crutches in a few days and if your work doesn't involve lifting and extensive walking you should be back to work in a week. Plan on a good few months for full recovery.

BTW - I'm NOT an opthopod, but years ago worked for a hospital where we did some early development in video imaging of the procedure. Prior to that time only the surgeon could view what was going on inside the knee. Now the entire team can monitor the procedure and respond promptly on what is needed at the time.

All things being equal, cartilage tears are not nearly as bad to correct as in times past when more invasive procedures were used. Blown out ligaments are a different story. I had one of those done on my other knee. More involved. Knee might need to be opened to repair/reattach ligament. Much longer recovery. More rehab.

Good luck. (and lose that weight, it will help with the recovery!)

Last edited by take57; 01-25-2019 at 02:46 PM..
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