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Old 01-24-2019, 04:55 PM
 
Location: Islip,NY
17,134 posts, read 20,171,763 times
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I fell on 12/23/18 Went to the ER, said it was a sprain, followed up with a great orthopedic Doctor, got an MRI and the results came in that I tore my ACL. I just found out today. Has anyone had this surgery? I have to have it. I go back and see the orthopedist Monday to discuss further. What is recovery time like? I still work and I am 48 Years old and in fairly good health except for this and I have to loose a few pounds which I am working on. Thanks
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Old 01-24-2019, 05:39 PM
 
2,517 posts, read 1,385,571 times
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I had a similar knee surgery and it took a solid 3 months of rehab to get back to any legitimate activity. My surgery was larger and I was not allowed to put any weight on my leg for 6 weeks though. I would highly recommend taking at least two weeks off. I worked from home after one but should not have and I have a desk (computer) job.
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Old 01-24-2019, 05:40 PM
 
Location: Southern California
20,842 posts, read 6,969,408 times
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I've not had this issue but have my own. I have heard from others they can repair on their own and then I've read some require surgery, but expect some down time. You can do a search and read some older threads on ACL issues.

Here is some good info and another option which MAY work.

http://www.prptreatments.org/sports-medicine/acl-tear/

Last edited by jaminhealth; 01-24-2019 at 05:52 PM..
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Old 01-24-2019, 05:54 PM
 
225 posts, read 173,931 times
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My daughter tore her ACL and underwent surgery because she wants to keep playing sports but you may not need it. Below is a section from the her doctor's website about whether or not surgery will be needed.

Quote:
HOW WILL THE KNEE FUNCTION IF THE ACL IS TORN?

If no structure other than the ACL is injured, the knee usually regains it range of motion and is painless after six or eight weeks. The knee may feel “normal”. However, it can be a “trick knee”. If a knee has a torn ACL, the knee can give way or be unstable when the person pivots or changes direction. The athlete can usually run straight ahead without a problem but when he or she makes a quick turning motion, the knee tends to give way and collapse. This abnormal motion can damage the menisci or articular cartilage and cause further knee problems.

If a person does not do sports and is relatively inactive, the knee can feel quite normal even if the ACL is torn. Thus, in some older or less active patients, the ACL may not need to be reconstructed. In young, athletic patients, however, the knee will tend to reinjure frequently and give way during activities in which the person quickly changes direction. Therefore, it is usually recommended to reconstruct the torn ACL.
ACL patient information
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Old 01-24-2019, 06:10 PM
 
1,297 posts, read 1,455,197 times
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I have had 4 meniscus tears and have never had surgery. I have one now in my left knee that originally tore last July. I have fairly normal movement and sometimes no pain when I walk short distances. It is slowly improving. I can bike on it normally with no pain. Have had one shot of cortisone in it, which gave some brief relief. Eventually, it will heal and the pain will go completely away. Just takes time. Others I know who had surgery told me they will never do the surgery again. Just as the article mentions above, I am the older person who can't change direction quickly!
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Old 01-24-2019, 06:35 PM
 
Location: Islip,NY
17,134 posts, read 20,171,763 times
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Unfortunately this was a bad injury Surgery is definite. It has to be reconstructed, the knee is still weak and it's a month since the injury, I still hear clicking sounds in the knee, Still can't bend the knee or straighten it or even bend down on one knee. When I fell the knee buckled. I am a pretty active person who does not like too sit around too long. I also have a desk job and have to climb stairs at my job (no elevator) it's only 1 flight though. I also have arthritis in the knee. I have a top notch orthopedic surgeon and he's not the type to rush into any surgery unless absolutely necessary. Thanks for all the replies. I'll keep you posted I have another follow up Monday to discuss the surgery and all of the particulars.
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Old 01-24-2019, 07:33 PM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
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Oh sorry to hear this, Lubby!
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Old 01-24-2019, 07:59 PM
 
7,868 posts, read 11,524,148 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rivertowntalk View Post
I have had 4 meniscus tears and have never had surgery. I have one now in my left knee that originally tore last July. I have fairly normal movement and sometimes no pain when I walk short distances. It is slowly improving. I can bike on it normally with no pain. Have had one shot of cortisone in it, which gave some brief relief. Eventually, it will heal and the pain will go completely away. Just takes time. Others I know who had surgery told me they will never do the surgery again. Just as the article mentions above, I am the older person who can't change direction quickly!
Not sure why you think that is relevant. You're talking about a small piece of cartilage, not a major stabilizing ligament. A torn meniscus and a torn ACL are two completely different things. They aren't even anywhere close to being comparable.
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Old 01-24-2019, 08:12 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,435 posts, read 6,610,087 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lubby View Post
I fell on 12/23/18 Went to the ER, said it was a sprain, followed up with a great orthopedic Doctor, got an MRI and the results came in that I tore my ACL. I just found out today. Has anyone had this surgery? I have to have it. I go back and see the orthopedist Monday to discuss further. What is recovery time like? I still work and I am 48 Years old and in fairly good health except for this and I have to loose a few pounds which I am working on. Thanks
My daughter (around age 32 at the time) apparently sustained repeated injuries to her ACL over time, probably from ballet moves, and she finished it off with some sort of a twisting movement of that leg. She was fooling around, twisted the knee, and from the pop she heard, the pain, followed by stiffness and leg instability knew she'd done something bad to that knee.

She took it to an orthopedic surgeon recommended to her by the docs she works with, and the orthopedic doc ordered an MRI. The results showed the remnants of the ACL, and mostly a large space where it had been, and she informed my daughter that she'd have a difficult time using that knee again without surgery (an ACL replacement).

My daughter had that ACL replacement surgery- the surgeon decided, since my daughter has a genetic collagen defect condition that make her own tissue weaker, to replace her ACL with a cadaver Achilles tendon, and she did a fantastic job. My daughter wanted to be able to get back to her level of activity before the injury, and the doc promised her she would if she followed the post surgery instructions, including 12 weeks of physical therapy (3x a week). Well, she did that, in fact she did so well with meeting the physical therapy goals the surgeon said she didn't need the last 3 weeks. And that knee is about as good as new these days.

She says her overall recovery time ( with the knee virtually normal), was about 3 to 3.5 months.
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Old 01-24-2019, 08:56 PM
 
Location: Eugene, Oregon
7,892 posts, read 2,505,417 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lubby View Post
Unfortunately this was a bad injury Surgery is definite. It has to be reconstructed, the knee is still weak and it's a month since the injury, I still hear clicking sounds in the knee, Still can't bend the knee or straighten it or even bend down on one knee. When I fell the knee buckled. I am a pretty active person who does not like too sit around too long. I also have a desk job and have to climb stairs at my job (no elevator) it's only 1 flight though. I also have arthritis in the knee. I have a top notch orthopedic surgeon and he's not the type to rush into any surgery unless absolutely necessary. Thanks for all the replies. I'll keep you posted I have another follow up Monday to discuss the surgery and all of the particulars.
A lot depends on whether the ACL was completely or only partially torn. From what you've said, it seems as though only a partial tear was suffered. The blood circulation in the ligament flows from the top to the bottom. If part of the ligament is intact, then blood can continue flowing and it can do some healing on its own. If the tear is complete, it's possible that modern surgery could save the ligament, but it would be much more difficult. It's also important to have surgery done without a long delay, as the ligament will wither without a blood flow.

There is a type of reconstructive surgery for a complete ACL tear, called a patellar transplant. The outer third of the broad patellar tendon (the tendon from the kneecap down to the front of the lower leg bone) is sectioned out at the top and is pulled down around and through the joint and anchored on the back of the upper leg bone. It then serves the same function as the ACL did. After it grows into the leg bone (femur), rehabilitation can begin. The remaining two-thirds of the patellar tendon seems able to continue doing its basic job.

I've known a few people personally who had this surgery and it worked out well for them. Willie Davenport, the Olympic gold medal winner in the 110-meter high-hurdles in 1972, completely torn his ACL a year later and it couldn't be repaired. But he underwent a patellar transplant, became rehabilitated and resumed his training. In a personal triumph and one for orthopedic surgery, in 1976, he won the bronze medal in his event in the Olympics. He said that the medal should go to his surgeon, Dr. Stan James.
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