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Old 02-05-2019, 06:43 PM
 
Location: Podunk, IA
3,153 posts, read 1,431,952 times
Reputation: 3260

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I took to mine straight away, full mask, no trouble at all.
Sucks if you gotta sneeze, though!!

I've lost a lot of weight, so I'm wondering if I'm still going to need it in the not too distant future.
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Old 02-05-2019, 06:54 PM
 
Location: Saint Johns, FL
1,156 posts, read 882,423 times
Reputation: 1218
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
Reluctant CPAP user here. Very reluctant. When I finally took the test I only slept 3 1/2 hours in a noisy environment. Who designs areas where you take a sleep test that are noisy? Idiots, that's who. In those 3 1/2 hours I stopped breathing 121 times.

So I broke down and got a CPAP. Smartest thing I ever did. I, too, slept well (I thought). I was never tired during the day, etc.

Now I know I really wasn't sleeping as well as I thought. I am now a strong proponent and never sleep w/o it. BTW, it does not count as a carry on item since it's medical.

I use this type of mask because it's minimal. Just two pillows that fit in the nose and a couple of straps. The pillows sometimes leak around the edge. Just pull on them a little and let them snap back. They seal up again.



https://www.thecpapshop.com/resmed-a...yABEgK9QfD_BwE
I'd like to re-emphasize this post. This is incredibly good advice. I use this exact mask. It is called a nasal pillow mask. If I had to use a full face mask I would never be compliant. I constantly leaked.

But with this mask I can hardly tell it's on, and can't sleep without it. And...no snoring !
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Old 02-05-2019, 10:27 PM
 
3,621 posts, read 1,045,648 times
Reputation: 2708
Quote:
Originally Posted by Travelassie View Post
I don't believe I have ever gone to a physician who did NOT emphasize the importance of regular exercise in maintaining a healthy life style.
Well I have.

And the OP still has not said whether his doctor mentioned the importance of exercise. And most of the comments are ignoring possible causes.
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Old 02-05-2019, 10:29 PM
 
3,621 posts, read 1,045,648 times
Reputation: 2708
Quote:
Originally Posted by reneeh63 View Post
We knew we could count on you to cover lifestyle!

Lots of times sleep apnea can be improved by losing weight - but not always - and there is usually a physiological component that weight loss won't fully resolve.

And even if someone is willing and able to lose 50 pounds, that doesn't happen overnight. It could easily take a year to lose that in a healthy manner - do you expect them to NOT use a CPAP until they've dutifully lost the weight? That sounds like someone more interested in punishing someone than improving their quality of life.
Is there something wrong with my mentioning lifestyle? Almost everyone at this forum ignores it, as if it doesn't matter. When actually lifestyle is probably more important than anything else in determining health or sickness. And lifestyle is ignored by most Americans and by most health professionals.
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Old 02-05-2019, 10:32 PM
 
27,565 posts, read 38,922,794 times
Reputation: 35703
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
Of course you've never tried it either. You've never had your spouse wake you up in a panic because you haven't taken a breath for so long that they expect you to die.

I have. Many times.

Wearing one like I wear is so non-invasive that I don't realize I'm wearing it unless I knock it loose. I won't even take a nap without it. I won't because I wake up gasping for air with my heart pounding.

The downside to the anti-doctor fanatics is that treatment is ignored by people who believe you and take some "magic" powder. Then we hear later that they died of a heart attack brought on by apnea.

The problem with your opinions is that you are convincing people to ignore what might save their life.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Travelassie View Post
I'd hope most people would consider the source, and take this poster's comments with a very large grain of salt.

Regarding sleep apnea, my husband had a severe case, probably not helped by his asthma, and I think his sleep study and subsequent use of a CPap machine probably did save his life. His breathing was obstructed, can't even begin to count the number of times he stopped breathing, and his sleep quality was lousy. He had a number of very close calls with accidents when he fell asleep while driving. He's had the CPap machine for many years now, his quality of sleep is excellent now, and he wouldn't be without the CPap at this point.
Do you often call people liars?

I spent 10 years (2000 to 2010) resisting a CPAP. When I finally agreed to take a test it was because my wife was scared that I might die. No BS here, no hedging, no inflating the truth. Towards the end of 2010 I stopped breathing at least 15 times every night. And these are the ones that woke her up. She actually kept a log to show me I was so reluctant/stupid. Sometimes I would wake up before she noticed with my body literally shaking because I was fighting to get air.

So when you call me a liar I only have one response. Kiss my a$$.
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Old 02-05-2019, 10:47 PM
 
27,565 posts, read 38,922,794 times
Reputation: 35703
Quote:
Originally Posted by Good4Nothin View Post
Is there something wrong with my mentioning lifestyle? Almost everyone at this forum ignores it, as if it doesn't matter. When actually lifestyle is probably more important than anything else in determining health or sickness. And lifestyle is ignored by most Americans and by most health professionals.
I agree and I am guilty. I don't exercise near enough. It's very difficult to so for me. I suffer from chronic pain and it hurts to simply sit in a chair. I've tried the classes where you sit in a chair and use big rubber bands and balls to exercise. I was the youngest person there and I was 68 at the time.

I couldn't do it. All my joints screamed at me. My muscles burned. Like pouring Bengay all over me. Arms, legs, feet (peripheral neuropathy) hands, elbows, hips, knees, everywhere. Walking can be a real joy as well. Polio in my right leg at age four. Hit by a car on my right hip when I was nine. You should see me take a flight of stairs. I look like I'm 100. That's on a good day. On a bad day I just don't go up flights if there is no elevator. And being as lucky as I am my right phrenic nerve died a few years back and that diaphragm went with it. In the process it pulled up into my right lung and I've 30% of it's use. I think the doctors refer to it as necropathy. Not sure that's the right word.

So I don't get to exercise and it ticks me off. I was always strong as a bull. Now I'm not. I miss it.
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Old 02-05-2019, 10:56 PM
 
3,621 posts, read 1,045,648 times
Reputation: 2708
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
I agree and I am guilty. I don't exercise near enough. It's very difficult to so for me. I suffer from chronic pain and it hurts to simply sit in a chair. I've tried the classes where you sit in a chair and use big rubber bands and balls to exercise. I was the youngest person there and I was 68 at the time.

I couldn't do it. All my joints screamed at me. My muscles burned. Like pouring Bengay all over me. Arms, legs, feet (peripheral neuropathy) hands, elbows, hips, knees, everywhere. Walking can be a real joy as well. Polio in my right leg at age four. Hit by a car on my right hip when I was nine. You should see me take a flight of stairs. I look like I'm 100. That's on a good day. On a bad day I just don't go up flights if there is no elevator. And being as lucky as I am my right phrenic nerve died a few years back and that diaphragm went with it. In the process it pulled up into my right lung and I've 30% of it's use. I think the doctors refer to it as necropathy. Not sure that's the right word.

So I don't get to exercise and it ticks me off. I was always strong as a bull. Now I'm not. I miss it.
It is of course understandable that you don't exercise. It's really too bad, since you are in the minority of Americans who understand its importance for health.

So many don't exercise even though they have no physical limitations that prevent it. They let their muscles get weak and they don't care.

I am sorry to hear you have all those pains, and I wish I had advice.

I have also experienced a lot of pains and limitations, because I have fibromyalgia and Lyme disease. But fortunately in my case exercise is actually the only thing that cured the pain. That is why I often mention exercise and lifestyle at this forum, because it helps me so much.

I just wish everyone were able to do something physical.

And by the way, with all the doctors I have seen for those diseases, only one, a chiropractor, suggested yoga. And he was right. None of the MDs said a word about yoga or any kind of exercise.
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Old 02-05-2019, 11:48 PM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
2,275 posts, read 803,750 times
Reputation: 4665
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
I'll give you some facts from personal experience instead of some study paid for by God knows who.

It does NOT get better with age. It gets worse. Anyone who says otherwise is a fool. Stating a few percent improvement is ridiculous. Again, I took my CPAP test and slept 3 1/2 hours. I stopped breathing 121 times. With a CPAP I don't stop breathing. Period.

That study, at least from my experience (and those I know who use one) is bull****.

Seems it's a race to publish so they can get grants. Yeah, I'm buying into that scenario.

https://www.ersnet.org/professional-...d-sponsorships

Edit: Readers should be told that the study was for mortality rates. While a good thing to look at it ignores everyone who isn't going to die from apnea. Like me. Mainly because I use a CPAP.

A) It remains to be seen if you're going to die from sleep apnea. Using CPAP reduces your risk, but does not eliminate it.


2) You were severely symptomatic-- reason in and of itself to treat, regardless of the severity of the numbers. Treatment reduced your symptoms- good reason to continue it. {OP is not symptomatic}


c) The study I quoted concluded treatment AIN'T what its cracked up to be. I doubt a special interest group pain them for that info. (Actually, it made no conclusion about treatment-- it just showed the numbers.)


4) DEATH RATE improves after age 50. That says nothing about symptoms. (It could just be that the herd gets thinned out-- only the healthier ones survive to old age?)


Sleep Apnea Syndrome was originally described in the medical literature as "Pickwickian Syndrome." Charles Dickens had a minor character in the Pickwick Papers who was a young guy, very obese, who frequently fell asleep in the middle of a sentence. Originally it was thought that all SA cases were overweight. We now know it's common, but not necessary.


We ALL stop breathing periodically during sleep. (Cheyne-Stokes breathing.) Normal people pick RR up again before O2 levels fall significantly or for a long period of time. To qualify as "positive" a sleep study has to show O2 levels falling below a certain level for a certain period of time. (O2<88 for 2 min, as I recall?)


People who snore, often, but not always, have sleep apnea (obstructive). Surgery to remove the uvula & soft palate can relieve the snoring, but has a poor success rate in improving the SA.


Most people have "Central" SA-- something screwed up with the breathing control center in the hypothalamus. Coincidently, the satiety/hunger center is also located in the hypothalamus. That might explain why SA & obesity are so frequently coincidental. ...might also explain why the surgery for obstruction isn't that good.


To be noted- overweight SA pts who are treated with CPAP often lose weight without any special effort.???Something to do with the hypothalamus problem?


Exercise has a good deal of physical benefit, lots of psychological benefit, but little benefit in weight control or treatment of SA. Everyone should do it, but don't expect miracles.
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Old 02-06-2019, 01:46 AM
 
8,706 posts, read 7,687,158 times
Reputation: 18924
I was diagnosed to have SA 15 years ago. Tests showed I had a small heart attack in the past. I was developing lung problems and kidney problems. I was not really healthy, caused by SA. I snored so bad we had separate bedrooms.

I was put on a cpap machine. Mine works between 13 and 18 pressure setting, automatic adjustment to keep me breathing right. I also have an oxygen generator, pulling oxygen out of room air set at 4.5. I have forgotten to turn on oxygen machine, and I get terrible night mares, and turn it on and I am back asleep in minutes and no more dreams.

Within days I started feeling better. Within months, my heart was stronger, as were my lungs were working right. My organs are better and healthier than ever. If I had not gone on these devices, I would not be alive today. My Cardiologist tells me I am her healthiest patent at 87 years old, including those 20 and more years younger. I still pass my drivers license test and do not need glasses to drive. My weight is almost my ideal weight for big boned 6'2" male ranging my ideal weight to 5 pounds one way or another over periods of time.

If your doctors say you need to use these machines, listen and do it. It can be your life you are playing with.
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Old 02-06-2019, 07:14 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,456 posts, read 6,637,387 times
Reputation: 13454
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
Do you often call people liars?

I spent 10 years (2000 to 2010) resisting a CPAP. When I finally agreed to take a test it was because my wife was scared that I might die. No BS here, no hedging, no inflating the truth. Towards the end of 2010 I stopped breathing at least 15 times every night. And these are the ones that woke her up. She actually kept a log to show me I was so reluctant/stupid. Sometimes I would wake up before she noticed with my body literally shaking because I was fighting to get air.

So when you call me a liar I only have one response. Kiss my a$$.

Geez, calm down, take a deep breath, think about things for a minute before you knee-jerk react and make an unfounded accusation like that....

I was not even referring to you in that post you quoted, and if you considered the context of your post and my response, you would realize that. You stated to a certain poster your opinion that her attempts to discredit sleep apnea management by traditional medicine ( like her innumerable posts attempting to discredit main stream medicine and its providers) could be dangerous to others who might take those posts seriously and might forego needed medical treatment. My response, referring to that poster, NOT YOU, was that hopefully your concern about this could be mostly unfounded if most people simply took this poster's negative comments about mainstream medicine with a grain of salt ( ie, with a healthy skepticism).

And perhaps a little more thought on this would beg the question, exactly why or about what would I accuse you of lying? I'm on your side regarding the importance of diagnosing sleep apnea, and the use of CPAP machines to treat it. You've related your positive experiences and outcomes on this topic, as I also have about my husband's sleep apnea. He wouldn't sleep without his CPAP set up at this point, and as his wife I can see the positive results from his getting enough quality sleep with it.
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