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Old 02-07-2019, 08:59 AM
 
11,085 posts, read 5,370,121 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by reneeh63 View Post
How do you even know they have sleep apnea? Snoring is a possible sign but NOT a diagnosis. That's why they do a sleep study - to find out what it is and the severity.

Just because we hear more about sleep apnea people are overgeneralizing what it is, and then it suddenly isn't a big deal and can be ignored. I guess it is the typical cycle - something starts out as seemingly rare and it gets treated as something important but then as more is learned about it and it gets in the news then it is no longer shocking so who cares, it can be ignored "since everyone has it".

Just because a lot of people have a problem doesn't necessarily mean it is normal and doesn't mean there are no health problems associated with it.
My brother had some thing done, he called me to ask if he should wear a CPAP, I know my husband has it because I often told him to turn on his side to avoid it, I breath with my mouth when I sleep, my mouth is dry in the morning, my sister told me she has it, I forgot how she knew.

I’m sure there are some health issues, but minor, but it’s hard for a lot of people to sleep with a CPAP. That’s the trade off you have to make. But there are other things that cause health issue. But none of us are obese or overweight. Different people CPAP might be beneficial.

Plus, I notice when my husband walks twice in the day, the snoring decreases. He told me, my snoring decreased on our first long trip to UK, we had to walk everyday, all of a sudden, he didn’t hear me anymore, snoring that is. This is before I lost 15 lbs, so more walking helps, even for just 15-20 minutes after dinner.

Last edited by NewbieHere; 02-07-2019 at 09:20 AM..
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Old 02-07-2019, 12:25 PM
 
12,500 posts, read 6,503,349 times
Reputation: 23094
Quote:
Originally Posted by lubby View Post
I think a sleep study is a bunch of BS IMO. My husband went for one 12/31/18. We called for the result's 2 weeks later and was told they did not have them yet. 1 week later I get a call from Apria health telling me my husband's C-Pap Machine has been order and ready to be shipped but that I had to pay $345.00 down and $40.00 a month for 9 months and then the Machine is mine. Mind you these people are calling from overseas call centers. I told the guy on the phone that we were not told of any C-pap machine being ordered and that no doctor or representative from the sleep study ever called us with any results. so we cancelled the C-PAP machine. I can't afford $345.00 right now plus all of the other medical bills associated with this sleep study and we have insurance but with a high deductible. My husband decided not to accept the machine and said if he dies from Sleep apnea oh well. He was furious at the lack of communication from the Hospital where the sleep study was done. As of today still no call and no results and he refuses to call. I support him 100% on this decision despite what some may say about it.

This is too late for you but...


The standard CPAP machines have an integral cellular data modem. Other countries that don't have expensive for-profit medicine just send you something like a ResMed S10 AutoSet CPAP machine calibrated to the widest range and look at the telemetry data the next morning to confirm you have sleep apnea and to titrate to get the settings right. If you have high deductible insurance, it's far cheaper to just DIY. You can buy a new *cough* open box *cough* machine with a 2 year warranty online from an outfit like Second Wind CPAP for $785 or a low hours used one they've professionally cleaned with a 1 year warranty for $489. (I hope this is OK with C-D terms of service. People are priced out of treatment using sleep centers and durable medical equipment suppliers.) You can buy a ResMed P10 nasal pillow mask kit on Amazon for ~$70. There are Apnea-oriented message boards where there are tons of people happy to coach you through this. You can download software for your laptop to read the SD card from the machine for free.



There's also the CraigsList option. You can always find new machines or barely used machines for sale someone got "for free" with their health insurance (Medicaid, usually) and just about never used.



If I thought I had sleep apnea, had high deductible insurance, and was on a tight budget, I'd buy "Gently Used ResMed S10 AirSense AutoSet with EPR and Integrated Heated Humidifier - Climateline Air Tubing Included" for $489 and a ResMed P10 nasal pillow mask with S, M, and L pillows on Amazon. The lowest price mask on Amazon is $67 with free shipping from Melrose supplies. I'd drop onto the ApneaBoard message board and start a thread asking for some coaching. That web site has pages describing how to put the machine in clinician mode and pages instructing you how to download either the ResMed ResScan or Sleepyhead open source software for free so you can analyze the data collected on the SD card. The people on that message board are way better than the typical sleep center or durable medical equipment company employee. That board is run as a nonprofit so the supplier I referenced is referred to as "Supplier #2" from their supplier's list. The toughest thing for most people is adapting to the mask. The conventional wisdom is to try nasal pillows first. If you're a mouth breather, try a chin strap with nasal pillows next. Then try a nasal mask if that doesn't work. Finally, try a full face mask.



So with a $489 lightly used machine with a warranty and a $67 nasal pillow mask, you can confirm if you have sleep apnea for less money than your sleep center deductible and then have a machine that should be good for five+ years. If you have problems with the mask, trying alternatives runs up the costs but most people who breathe out of their nose end up with nasal pillows. You'll have to replace the filters occasionally but you can find threads on that message board for DIY filters that cost pennies. The humidifier tank seals will wear out eventually but those aren't expensive. The heated hose will wear out eventually. The silicon in the nasal pillows hardens so you need to replace those occasionally on Amazon. Figure $100/year for supplies and a low hours used replacement machine for sub-$500 every 5 years.
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Old 02-08-2019, 06:50 AM
 
Location: Islip,NY
17,160 posts, read 20,220,183 times
Reputation: 17762
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawk4042C View Post
One thing to try before using the CPAP, is an elevated/wedge pillow.

https://www.google.com/search?q=Elev...w=1920&bih=871

It helps to get your lungs elevated. For 30+ years I have slept propped up using blankets or extra pillows. Although I never had a sleep study, I suffer from Asthma. If I laid flat on my back without them I can't breathe.

You could even get another sleep study done using an elevated/wedge pillow. Hopefully it will improve your results, so a CPAP machine won't be needed right away. If not, the pillow will still help you breathe easier as you sleep.
get another sleep study done? No Thanks, that bill alone is $2,000 plus another $800 for the Chest x-ray and another $300 for the doctor bill. We are paying it off and this mind you is with a high deductible insurance. I too think his sleep apnea is mild.
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Old 02-08-2019, 06:57 AM
 
Location: Islip,NY
17,160 posts, read 20,220,183 times
Reputation: 17762
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
This is too late for you but...


The standard CPAP machines have an integral cellular data modem. Other countries that don't have expensive for-profit medicine just send you something like a ResMed S10 AutoSet CPAP machine calibrated to the widest range and look at the telemetry data the next morning to confirm you have sleep apnea and to titrate to get the settings right. If you have high deductible insurance, it's far cheaper to just DIY. You can buy a new *cough* open box *cough* machine with a 2 year warranty online from an outfit like Second Wind CPAP for $785 or a low hours used one they've professionally cleaned with a 1 year warranty for $489. (I hope this is OK with C-D terms of service. People are priced out of treatment using sleep centers and durable medical equipment suppliers.) You can buy a ResMed P10 nasal pillow mask kit on Amazon for ~$70. There are Apnea-oriented message boards where there are tons of people happy to coach you through this. You can download software for your laptop to read the SD card from the machine for free.



There's also the CraigsList option. You can always find new machines or barely used machines for sale someone got "for free" with their health insurance (Medicaid, usually) and just about never used.



If I thought I had sleep apnea, had high deductible insurance, and was on a tight budget, I'd buy "Gently Used ResMed S10 AirSense AutoSet with EPR and Integrated Heated Humidifier - Climateline Air Tubing Included" for $489 and a ResMed P10 nasal pillow mask with S, M, and L pillows on Amazon. The lowest price mask on Amazon is $67 with free shipping from Melrose supplies. I'd drop onto the ApneaBoard message board and start a thread asking for some coaching. That web site has pages describing how to put the machine in clinician mode and pages instructing you how to download either the ResMed ResScan or Sleepyhead open source software for free so you can analyze the data collected on the SD card. The people on that message board are way better than the typical sleep center or durable medical equipment company employee. That board is run as a nonprofit so the supplier I referenced is referred to as "Supplier #2" from their supplier's list. The toughest thing for most people is adapting to the mask. The conventional wisdom is to try nasal pillows first. If you're a mouth breather, try a chin strap with nasal pillows next. Then try a nasal mask if that doesn't work. Finally, try a full face mask.



So with a $489 lightly used machine with a warranty and a $67 nasal pillow mask, you can confirm if you have sleep apnea for less money than your sleep center deductible and then have a machine that should be good for five+ years. If you have problems with the mask, trying alternatives runs up the costs but most people who breathe out of their nose end up with nasal pillows. You'll have to replace the filters occasionally but you can find threads on that message board for DIY filters that cost pennies. The humidifier tank seals will wear out eventually but those aren't expensive. The heated hose will wear out eventually. The silicon in the nasal pillows hardens so you need to replace those occasionally on Amazon. Figure $100/year for supplies and a low hours used replacement machine for sub-$500 every 5 years.
Thanks but I don't trust a slightly used machine to be sanitary no matter what anyone says. Even @ 489.00 that's steep. My husband is firm on his decision and I am fine with it. But I appreciate the suggestions and advice.
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Old 02-08-2019, 09:38 PM
 
12,500 posts, read 6,503,349 times
Reputation: 23094
Quote:
Originally Posted by lubby View Post
Thanks but I don't trust a slightly used machine to be sanitary no matter what anyone says. Even @ 489.00 that's steep. My husband is firm on his decision and I am fine with it. But I appreciate the suggestions and advice.

My dad had untreated sleep apnea. From decades of the 40+ adrenaline hits per hour to his heart to wake him up enough to start breathing again, he developed afib. That also went untreated. Your stroke risk with untreated sleep apnea is off the charts. At age 75, he started doing funky behavior things. By age 80, he had full blown vascular dementia from all the mini-strokes. A CT scan of his brain looked like Swiss cheese. By 84, he was in a memory care facility and didn't know who I was. I sure hope you have long term care insurance or are really wealthy. If your husband goes that route, it will otherwise wipe you out financially. My mother has dementia. Most likely the Alzheimer's variety. I write a $9,000/month check to a memory care facility. What does your life look like if that happens? For not spending $489 on a low hours used CPAP machine.
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Old Yesterday, 10:18 AM
 
1,108 posts, read 472,138 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
What does your life look like if that happens? For not spending $489 on a low hours used CPAP machine.
How on earth can you connect this to sleep apnea. Many people over the age of 70 have strokes and dementia and don't have sleep apnea. My dad had TIAA strokes and dementia and didn't have sleep apnea.
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Old Yesterday, 10:51 AM
 
12,500 posts, read 6,503,349 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EmilyFoxSeaton View Post
How on earth can you connect this to sleep apnea. Many people over the age of 70 have strokes and dementia and don't have sleep apnea. My dad had TIAA strokes and dementia and didn't have sleep apnea.

It's very well documented that sleep apnea triggers all kinds of cardiac problems. Afib is the most common one and is what causes most of the enormous stroke risk.


The way a lot of people end up at a sleep center is when their primary care guy picks up afib in the annual physical. That then gets kicked over to a cardiologist who does the 24 hour holter monitor and asks the normal questions about heavy alcohol use and apnea that are the typical root cause.


The adrenaline spikes that wake you up if you have sleep apnea spike your blood pressure and greatly increase your stroke risk. Afib has gigantic stroke risk.



...and you totally fail at logic. I never said that all strokes are caused by sleep apnea. I said that apnea produces high stroke risk. Lean the difference.
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Old Today, 11:47 AM
 
11,085 posts, read 5,370,121 times
Reputation: 7574
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
My dad had untreated sleep apnea. From decades of the 40+ adrenaline hits per hour to his heart to wake him up enough to start breathing again, he developed afib. That also went untreated. Your stroke risk with untreated sleep apnea is off the charts. At age 75, he started doing funky behavior things. By age 80, he had full blown vascular dementia from all the mini-strokes. A CT scan of his brain looked like Swiss cheese. By 84, he was in a memory care facility and didn't know who I was. I sure hope you have long term care insurance or are really wealthy. If your husband goes that route, it will otherwise wipe you out financially. My mother has dementia. Most likely the Alzheimer's variety. I write a $9,000/month check to a memory care facility. What does your life look like if that happens? For not spending $489 on a low hours used CPAP machine.
My MIL had mild dementia, asked the same questions multiple times, she knew and recognized all of us, but she was living at home alone, no memory care. Died at 87 of a stroke. I think it varies. Most likely the reason is she never walked after my FIL decided he couldn’t keep up with her. She was a brisk walker before that. There many reasons. No need to scare people.
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Old Today, 11:50 AM
 
11,085 posts, read 5,370,121 times
Reputation: 7574
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
It's very well documented that sleep apnea triggers all kinds of cardiac problems. Afib is the most common one and is what causes most of the enormous stroke risk.


The way a lot of people end up at a sleep center is when their primary care guy picks up afib in the annual physical. That then gets kicked over to a cardiologist who does the 24 hour holter monitor and asks the normal questions about heavy alcohol use and apnea that are the typical root cause.


The adrenaline spikes that wake you up if you have sleep apnea spike your blood pressure and greatly increase your stroke risk. Afib has gigantic stroke risk.



...and you totally fail at logic. I never said that all strokes are caused by sleep apnea. I said that apnea produces high stroke risk. Lean the difference.
My husband and I don’t drink alcohol for health reason. His parents didnt either. They only had a sip around Christmas.
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Old Today, 03:50 PM
 
Location: Islip,NY
17,160 posts, read 20,220,183 times
Reputation: 17762
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewbieHere View Post
My MIL had mild dementia, asked the same questions multiple times, she knew and recognized all of us, but she was living at home alone, no memory care. Died at 87 of a stroke. I think it varies. Most likely the reason is she never walked after my FIL decided he couldn’t keep up with her. She was a brisk walker before that. There many reasons. No need to scare people.
He can say what ever he wants, I am not scared at all.
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