U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Health and Wellness
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 03-11-2019, 10:03 AM
 
19,227 posts, read 15,861,243 times
Reputation: 36199

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucy_C View Post
My husband is currently recovering from a lamenectomy - I'll just warn you that the post-surgery muscle spasms were a killer amount of pain. The morphine and oxy didn't even seem to help. They only lasted about 5-6 days, but those were a really tough 5-6 days.... (He's one month out now and doing quite well)

I did not have that kind of pain after my surgery. I had it BEFORE my surgery however, to the point I don't think I could have lived if we hadn't been able to do anything.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-11-2019, 10:09 AM
 
19,160 posts, read 10,611,087 times
Reputation: 19110
Quote:
Originally Posted by ocnjgirl View Post
I think you should find another surgeon and get another opinion. I had an L4-L5 laminectomy 2 years or so ago. I too have stenosis and arthritis, also a cyst, and I had a herniation causing Sciatica so severe I couldn't work for 10 months and was crawling to the bathroom. They made me get 4 epidurals first which did very little.



My surgeon never suggested a fusion. He did a laminectomy and used a special material but I cannot remember now what it is..I will keep trying to find it. My insurance denied it at first because the material is more expensive than whatever they used to use, but they approved it on appeal.


I went in for my surgey at 6am, and by noon I was walking up the 2 flights of steps to my apartment. I was pain-free within 2 weeks, and back to work a few weeks after that (very physical job). I have not had any problems since then (knock wood).
As my situation was described to me, a fusion is necessary because of disc compression, vertebra movement, and arthritis--all related to my age. Are you young enough not to be dealing with age-related issues?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2019, 10:18 AM
 
237 posts, read 113,526 times
Reputation: 952
Quote:
Originally Posted by nbseer View Post
I am 67, MRI and x-ray shows I have spinal stenosis, scoliosis, probably spinal arthritis too. Degenerative spondylolistesis at L4-L5,resulting in pinched nerve and pain when standing or walking. A very well regarded orthopedic surgeon rejected my suggestion of a minimally-invasive laminectomy, saying since 2 discs were involved, fusion and a more expansive procedure would be needed, and he didn't think the results would be all that good.

I had an injection, did nothing. Various stretching, nothing. I guess since it doesn't hurt when sleeping on my side or sitting, I should just accept the pain when standing or walking? For the rest of my life
Your back is complicated, so bear with me. During my career as a physician assistant, I did work with two different neurosurgeons (one in Dallas and one in Plano). Some comments:

1) You at least need a second (and maybe a third) opinion from a surgeon.

2) Neurosurgeon vs. orthopedic spine surgeon. I happen to prefer neurosurgeons, but there are fine orthopedic spine surgeons as well. Why not at least get a second opinion from a neurosurgeon, and then compare and contrast the two opinions?

3) Let me describe the approach of the neurosurgeons I worked for. Taking the physical exam findings, history, and imaging studies into consideration, he would explain what was the most likely cause of the symptoms and propose treatment.

He would always consider whether pain management might help the patient, and exhaust that option before recommending surgery (e.g., ESI -- epidural steroid injection, facet joint injections, etc.).

When he would recommend surgery, he would try to recommend the specific surgery that was most likely to address the symptoms the patient was experiencing. He would carefully weigh the risks and the benefits of the surgery. More is not necessarily better. also, less may be inadequate if it doesn't relief the symptoms.

4) In general, every low back problem does NOT require a fusion. However, it is sometimes necessary for multi-level disc disease and other spinal pathology.

5) I suggest that you continue to do "research" by seeking a second (and maybe a third) opinion. Carefully weigh what each says. You need an honest and realistic appraisal of the prospects of benefit from whatever surgery is proposed.

6) If you are not satisfied with either opinion, by all means seek a third. There is a sort of "law of diminishing return", but if it may not "kick in" until after the third (or fourth) opinion. I'll think you'll know when to stop.

7) Your decision about possible surgery is a big deal. Be patient (no pun intended) in gathering information. Best to you.

Last edited by townshend; 03-11-2019 at 10:29 AM..
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2019, 10:24 AM
 
19,160 posts, read 10,611,087 times
Reputation: 19110
Quote:
Originally Posted by townshend View Post
Your back is complicated, so bear with me. During my career as a physician assistant, I did work with two different neurosurgeons (one in Dallas and one in Plano). Some comments:

1) You at least need a second (and maybe a third) opinion from a surgeon.

2) Neurosurgeon vs. orthopedic spine surgeon. I happen to prefer neurosurgeons, but there are fine orthopedic spine surgeons as well. Why not at least get a second opinion from a neurosurgeon, and then compare and contrast the two opinions?

3) Let me describe the approach of the neurosurgeons I worked for. Taking the physical exam findings, history, and imaging studies into consideration, he would explain what was the most likely cause of the symptoms and propose treatment.

He would always consider whether pain management might help the patient, and exhaust that option before recommending surgery (e.g., ESI -- epidural steroid injection, facet joint injections, etc.).

When he would recommend surgery, he would try to recommend the specific surgery that was most likely to address the symptoms the patient was experiencing. He would carefully weigh the risks and the benefits of the surgery. More is not necessarily better. also, less may be inadequate if it doesn't relief the symptoms.

4) In general, every low back problem does NOT require a fusion. However, it is sometimes necessary for multi-level disc disease and other spinal pathology.

5) I suggest that you continue to do "research" by seeking a second (and maybe a third) opinion. Carefully weigh what each says. You need an honest and realistic appraisal of the prospects of benefit from whatever surgery is proposed.

Best wishes.
Do you have any recommendations for Dallas/Plano?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2019, 10:31 AM
 
237 posts, read 113,526 times
Reputation: 952
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ralph_Kirk View Post
Do you have any recommendations for Dallas/Plano?
Yes sir. Would you please PM me privately, and I will gladly share the information.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2019, 10:54 AM
 
Location: Northern VA
468 posts, read 585,554 times
Reputation: 565
I haven't had surgery (yet) but I'm probably heading there. I have degenerative discs, disc space narrowing and desiccation, various bulges and protrusions, and worsening scoliosis. I've tried everything from PT, dry needling, chiropractic, injections, and RF ablation. I've seen orthopedics, pain management and neurosurgery.

When I saw the neurosurgeon spine specialist, he determined that my hips were tilted roughly 12 degrees and that my pain was more in the SI joints than L3/4, which s where I've received most of my previous treatments. He recommended that I get some heel lifts, SI joint injections, and PT specific to the SI joints before we discuss surgical options. I'm scheduled for the injections April 1st and then a followup with the neurosurgeon April 30th. If the injections haven't helped, we'll be discussing surgical options.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2019, 11:01 AM
 
19,227 posts, read 15,861,243 times
Reputation: 36199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ralph_Kirk View Post
As my situation was described to me, a fusion is necessary because of disc compression, vertebra movement, and arthritis--all related to my age. Are you young enough not to be dealing with age-related issues?

I'm 57, but all my issues are degenerative. I also have herniations at C2, C3 and C4, but those symptoms have been manageable with conservative measures for 15 years.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2019, 11:05 AM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
24,083 posts, read 4,945,559 times
Reputation: 27865
SITUATIONS for everyone vary greatly...

don't compare yourself with others as far as diagnosis and projected surgery. People can only tell you their experiences.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2019, 12:25 PM
 
Location: Southern California
5,012 posts, read 7,857,111 times
Reputation: 4455
My dad had spinal stenosis (& don't know if had other back issues or not), but he had a surgery that didn't really help much, so he had a 2nd surgery. I don't personally know how much that helped either. I don't know how much less pain he was 1n between the 1st & the 2nd.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2019, 12:44 PM
 
Location: NJ
10,070 posts, read 20,857,147 times
Reputation: 7697
Quote:
Originally Posted by nbseer View Post
I am 67, MRI and x-ray shows I have spinal stenosis, scoliosis, probably spinal arthritis too. Degenerative spondylolistesis at L4-L5,resulting in pinched nerve and pain when standing or walking. A very well regarded orthopedic surgeon rejected my suggestion of a minimally-invasive laminectomy, saying since 2 discs were involved, fusion and a more expansive procedure would be needed, and he didn't think the results would be all that good.

I had an injection, did nothing. Various stretching, nothing. I guess since it doesn't hurt when sleeping on my side or sitting, I should just accept the pain when standing or walking? For the rest of my life
I agree with the others, you need more opinions, both with ortho and neuro surgeons.

I started out with bad spasms in my butt and a herniated L5-S1. I had a laminectomy that did not work. From what I've read they either work or they make you worst. I was worst. I then jumped into an L5-S1 fusion with something called an LT cage. It used cadaver bone; no rods or screws. Worst mistake I ever made. Don't get me wrong, I was ok for a few months after but boy was that sort lived!

A few months after my fusion the new flexible fusion became available. I wish I would have waited because backs are not made to be fused stiff; they need to be able to flex. I'm now fused with rods and screws since 2006 and am in more pain now then when I originally started.

About a year later I was getting acupuncture when a gal walked in; she was moving really well when here I was barely able to walk; I was using a cane and moving slow. Here she was walking fine and not sitting slow, she plopped herself down in the chair like she was fine. She told me she had her back done in Germany. She had 2 lower levels, a few thoracic and cervical using flexible disks. She said it cost her under $10,000. She was 2 years out of surgery. I did a bunch of googling after I got home; unfortunately they couldn't help me since I was fused stiff. Had I not made the mistake of being fused I surely would have gone over there because everything I googled was favorable. If you ever get to the point of needing fusion you should also consider it.

You may want to do some googling to see effects of laminectomy for someone with your history. You're a tough case to start off with.

Here are a few Germany links for anyone interested

artificial disc replacement Germany google

Spinal Disc Replacement: supporting pain free mobility through next generation Spinal Prosthesis shows their flexible disk

Stenum Hospital Germany - where the gal I met had hers done page that shows their flexible ADR (artificial disk replacement)

Artificial Disc Replacement Germany looks like an advice site. They also show various products used in Germany for lumbar and cervical

Last edited by Roselvr; 03-11-2019 at 12:59 PM..
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Health and Wellness
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. | Please obey Forum Rules | Terms of Use and Privacy Policy

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top