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Old 04-05-2019, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Raleigh
7,849 posts, read 5,811,703 times
Reputation: 10876

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Good4Nothin View Post
Salt and coffee are ok.
Not really.

If you eat a lot of salt you should look at cutting it back. It isn't hard to measure directly an increase in BP after eating something like Nissin Top Ramen.

Your morning cup of Joe is fine but I hope you aren't arguing that caffeine doesn't affect BP?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Good4Nothin View Post
Patients ignore the advice to exercise because they think they can get the same result from drugs. Taking a pill is easier. They don't realize that the pills will cause other problems, and will not fix the cause of the high BP.

I have argued about this many times at this forum. Doctors over-estimate the benefits of drugs, and mostly ignore the disadvantages.
No, they're ignore the advice because there is little in the way of symptoms and generic warnings about long term cardiac or kidney problems are vague. It isn't like Diabetes where the consequences are relatively immediate and can be dire in the extreme short term.

Fair skinned people are usually pretty good about wearing sunscreen, not because of cancer but because they fry.

Many Diabetics are pretty good about their sugar intake and monitoring not so they don't lose a foot in a few years, because if they go way high for awhile they get thirsty, have to pee all the time, have blurry vision and feel like garbage.
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Old 04-05-2019, 05:45 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas (Winchester)
393 posts, read 287,548 times
Reputation: 348
I'm 62 and retired now almost 5 years. I exercise a lot more than the average person (about 20 hours weekly). However, I'm currently recovering from hernia surgery I had 15 days ago. I can walk a bit with mild soreness, but the base of the incision is still not healed and quite tender. I've been doing pretty much nothing for over two weeks now.

That said, I just took my BP again with my digital Omron monitor. It is reading very low 90's / 50's. Odd, that I was concerned about having high blood pressure and now I'm concerned about having low BP. I guess I should just forget about it. A cardiologist observed from my recent echo-cardiogram that my heart had very good "pumping volume" and I have only mild dizziness if I sit too long and jump up... and if I exercise regularly and sleep well, I don't have this problem. He also monitored my pulse as I walked briskly through the halls. He said I had very good "reserve" as my pulse quickly jumped from 48 to 70.

As far as BP after exercise, BP should be considerably lower after aggressive aerobic exercise. I normally climb stairs (400+) on a stair climber for over an hour about every five or six days, until I'm completely drenched in sweat, head to toe. I've read this type of activity dilates the arteries, lowering BP. BP will remain lower for a few hours after such activity. That's what I've consistently measured w/my BP monitor.

Now, I'm not sure why the past couple of weeks of zero activity has lowered my BP. I would have thought it would have raised it. I can only surmise my BP may have been elevated due to the stress of impending surgery. I had to jump through hoops to get to surgery, because my EKG was abnormal. I had to see a cardiologist and have an echo-cardiogram, where everything was normal except an elevated RVSP of 41 (up to 45 is in the normal range for my age group). All this stressed me out. Now the surgery is over and I can see the total cost of my pre-op exams is a manageable $635 (the surgery only cost me $2100 for everything all out-of-network - thank you Affordable Hernia Surgery), and with no more Dr. appointments pending hopefully for at least three years, my stress level is low again.

Due to financial reasons, I don't go to doctors unless something is wrong that I cannot treat on my own. Once I start exercising again, I'll see what sort of readings I get on my BP monitor.

Last edited by mitchmiller9; 04-05-2019 at 06:11 PM..
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Old Yesterday, 03:57 AM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
2,649 posts, read 926,071 times
Reputation: 5518
A few pertinent thoughts:


BP is a physiologic variable, like HR or RR. They vary with what's going on- they're lower when you're resting; higher when you're exercising, thinking, talking, worrying, etc.


There's a difference between "hi BP readings" (not truly in resting state) vs the disease HTN (always hi BP, never normal). White coat HTN may be due to anxiety or to just being conscientious- just wanting to do a good job-- enough extra adrenalin to push up readings.


Life style changes alone rarely bring treatable HTN down to a safe (no need for treatment) level. The difference between the "out of shape" guy and "in shape guy" is how the body responds to exercise. If not accustomed to exercise and forced to run, say, your body will respond to increased demand for blood flow by speeding up your HR and raising your BP. If you're in shape, your body has learned to increase blood flow by more efficiently increasing the flow by bigger heart beats so BP & HR don't have to go up as much.


Salt intake usually doesn't determine IF you have HTN, although it can make it worse if you're one of those nuts that starts pouring salt on a pizza (a cleverly determined perfect mixture of starch and salt) even before you taste it. You guys deserve a good slap.)
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Old Yesterday, 06:21 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
70,844 posts, read 82,103,848 times
Reputation: 40567
Quote:
Originally Posted by guidoLaMoto View Post
A few pertinent thoughts:


BP is a physiologic variable, like HR or RR. They vary with what's going on- they're lower when you're resting; higher when you're exercising, thinking, talking, worrying, etc.


There's a difference between "hi BP readings" (not truly in resting state) vs the disease HTN (always hi BP, never normal). White coat HTN may be due to anxiety or to just being conscientious- just wanting to do a good job-- enough extra adrenalin to push up readings.


Life style changes alone rarely bring treatable HTN down to a safe (no need for treatment) level. The difference between the "out of shape" guy and "in shape guy" is how the body responds to exercise. If not accustomed to exercise and forced to run, say, your body will respond to increased demand for blood flow by speeding up your HR and raising your BP. If you're in shape, your body has learned to increase blood flow by more efficiently increasing the flow by bigger heart beats so BP & HR don't have to go up as much.


Salt intake usually doesn't determine IF you have HTN, although it can make it worse if you're one of those nuts that starts pouring salt on a pizza (a cleverly determined perfect mixture of starch and salt) even before you taste it. You guys deserve a good slap.)
ok, come slap me;; no,not really I do not use salt without tasting but I have to admit I love my salt. I am shocked at how many places we visit that no longer put salt shakers on the table. Even though I do take a low dosage of meds for high BP, my doctor isn't concerned about my salt intake, as my sodium level is actually on the low side. Not much below normal, but a little.
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Old Yesterday, 06:25 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
70,844 posts, read 82,103,848 times
Reputation: 40567
Quote:
Originally Posted by charmed hour View Post
Walking into and around the Walmart will raise your pressure-- physical activity raises blood pressure--the better physical shape you're in the lower it will rise during physical activity. Also, those type of machines are often not very accurate-- appropriate cuff size in measuring BP is important.
that is exactly what I am thinking; and yes, I had done a lot of walking yesterday when I decided to check I just find it interesting it is always the same, when I do the WalMart checking. Anyway, I am not going to lose sleep over this. Heck I will be 82 in a couple of weeks. So far, so good.
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Old Yesterday, 09:44 AM
 
10,003 posts, read 9,144,463 times
Reputation: 15490
As my physician explained: BP varies throughout the day. He advised that if I take my pressure at home and it may seem a little high to me, not to fret because it will drop later in the day. He said if it didn't drop at all, then I should let him know.

I am on a low dose bp med and as a rule my reading is 118/70. However, stress is my enemy and there is one specialist I have to seen twice a year and the appointment stresses me out so much that my readings there are usually 140-150/75; but once I leave, the pressure returns to my normal range.

At one visit the technician began to freak out at the reading, claiming I was close to having a stroke (I think she was the one who may stroke out with her attitude). I told her to take the reading again after my visit with the doctor - which she did and it was back to normal.

My doctor also said that every patient of his is unique and he does not expect each of us to have the same bp ranges; he knows our history, etc., and goes by that.
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Old Yesterday, 10:22 AM
 
1,284 posts, read 419,194 times
Reputation: 3370
Quote:
Originally Posted by guidoLaMoto View Post
There's a difference between "hi BP readings" (not truly in resting state) vs the disease HTN (always hi BP, never normal). White coat HTN may be due to anxiety or to just being conscientious- just wanting to do a good job-- enough extra adrenalin to push up readings.
My late husband had "white coat hypertension". He bought a BP monitor, got lower readings at home, and brought it to the doctor's office, where it produced the same high readings as the doc's equipment. After that he recorded his BP at home regularly The home readings were always within normal limits so he and the doc weren't alarmed at the readings in the office.
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Old Yesterday, 10:42 AM
 
3,758 posts, read 1,109,877 times
Reputation: 2926
Quote:
Originally Posted by JONOV View Post
Not really.

If you eat a lot of salt you should look at cutting it back. It isn't hard to measure directly an increase in BP after eating something like Nissin Top Ramen.

Your morning cup of Joe is fine but I hope you aren't arguing that caffeine doesn't affect BP?


No, they're ignore the advice because there is little in the way of symptoms and generic warnings about long term cardiac or kidney problems are vague. It isn't like Diabetes where the consequences are relatively immediate and can be dire in the extreme short term.

Fair skinned people are usually pretty good about wearing sunscreen, not because of cancer but because they fry.

Many Diabetics are pretty good about their sugar intake and monitoring not so they don't lose a foot in a few years, because if they go way high for awhile they get thirsty, have to pee all the time, have blurry vision and feel like garbage.
Salt only raises BP temporarily in most people. There are some who might get chronic high BP from salt, but that is not typical. The idea that everyone should avoid salt is unscientific. And too little salt can be unhealthy.

Coffee is not considered a major cause of high BP. I don't drink a lot of coffee, just because too much of anything is no good.

Smoking cigarettes is a major cause of high BP, and of heart diseases and stroke. And lack of exercise is probably another major cause.
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Old Yesterday, 10:43 AM
 
13,048 posts, read 6,854,789 times
Reputation: 24061
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unicorn hunter View Post
I never let the doctor use that BP machine on me! I swear, just looking at that thing, and knowing it's going to squeeze my arm to bursting, causes my BP to rise! I always insist on the old fashioned method. I also had a very wise NP tell me to get the most accurate reading, the patient should be sitting still, legs uncrossed for at least 5 minutes before taking a reading. The variation is huge between doing it correctly with a manual set-up vs. doing it incorrectly with the machine, at least for me. My first reading was high enough that the doc wanted me to go on BP meds....15 minutes later, using no machine and following the guidelines stated above, it was spot on "normal" 120/80. Just my two cents.
120/80 is “elevated” bordering on hypertensive. It increases your stroke risk, particularly if you’re older. In 2019, pretty much any male 55+ would be put on a lightweight BP med to knock it down a bit. Just my $0.02.
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Old Yesterday, 11:27 AM
 
2,224 posts, read 739,500 times
Reputation: 3187
Quote:
Originally Posted by mitchmiller9 View Post
I had my blood pressure taken for the first time in about 12 years recently, when I visited a doc for a pre-surgical evaluation. The first attempt read 142/85. A second attempt read 135/85.

I had always had low blood pressure, so I purchased the same brand digital monitor the doc was using and began taking my blood pressure. I was under stress as I prepared for surgery. Most of my readings were in the 115 - 130/ 70 - 80 range. After I did aerobic exercise, it was considerably lower (as expected), reading 100 - 110/ 55 - 70 range. The highest reading on my home monitor was 142 / 90. Just before I went into surgery, my blood pressure was 180 / 95. Five minutes later, it was 135 / 85.

Now that I've had the surgery and have been laying around doing nothing for two weeks, I'm getting low readings in the range of 100 - 120/ 55 - 75. Just now I got the lowest reading I ever had 92 / 54.

This makes me wonder if measuring blood pressure is so variable using traditional measures that doctors are highly likely to be prescribing medication when it isn't necessary. Given my initial readings, some docs would have wanted me to start blood pressure medications to LOWER my blood pressure. Given my current readings, it looks like I have borderline hypotension, LOW blood pressure.

How can doctors rely on blood pressure readings to prescribe medications?


I have great blood pressure, every nurse or Dr who takes it says they wish theirs was as good. However, mine will also jump up from stress, or drop from other factors. When I had recent surgery, mine would drop down to about 96/45 in the morning, but after a few minutes climb to a normal reading.

Blood pressure is just one factor, but a very important one, especially if you do not want a stroke.
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