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Old 04-06-2019, 05:22 PM
 
3,913 posts, read 1,133,501 times
Reputation: 3074

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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgardener View Post
The whole idea of the guidelines is to make people aware of their blood pressure and the need to watch it more closely and therefore control it before it gets so high that they are at risk of heart attack or stroke.

If you want to wing it, go ahead, it's your life. I prefer to be aware and take action immediately, not wait until I'm in the grave, like my 55-year-old cousin who died of a heart attack last month. He had high cholesterol and hypertension, and he did nothing about it, refused to take a statin, refused to take a blood pressure medication.

Now he's dead at 55.
You make it sound like drugs are the only way someone can improve their health.
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Old 04-06-2019, 06:09 PM
 
1,892 posts, read 926,825 times
Reputation: 8013
Quote:
Originally Posted by Good4Nothin View Post
You make it sound like drugs are the only way someone can improve their health.
That is your interpretation, not what I said. I said he refused to do anything about it. Though, to be honest, he was quite lean and worked hard every day at his job. He was never overweight at all.

IF you can't improve your health by diet/exercise, then, yes, I think you should take the drugs and not die when you're 55 from something you could have had treated.

Last edited by oldgardener; 04-06-2019 at 06:21 PM..
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Old 04-06-2019, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Williamsburg, VA
3,011 posts, read 1,349,909 times
Reputation: 8050
Quote:
Originally Posted by Good4Nothin View Post
That is ridiculous. Just another way to make sure everyone is on one drug or another.

Guess we'll have to agree to disagree. I agree with the American Heart Association:


"The American Heart Association has an ideal limit of no more than 1,500 mg per day for most adults."


and

"More than 70 percent of the sodium Americans eat comes from packaged, prepared and restaurant foods — not the salt shaker. On average, Americans eat more than 3,400 milligrams of sodium each day — much more than the American Heart Association and other health organizations recommend. Most of us are likely underestimating how much sodium we eat,

To argue the other side for a moment, they do also say:

"The body needs only a small amount of sodium (less than 500 milligrams per day) to function properly. That’s a mere smidgen — the amount in less than ¼ teaspoon. Very few people come close to eating less than that amount. Plus, healthy kidneys are great at retaining the sodium that your body needs.
There’s no reliable evidence that eating less than 1,500 mg per day of sodium is a risk for the general population. There is some evidence that it could be harmful to certain patients with congestive heart failure."


But, FWIW, I still think the AHA supports my contention that most people don't have to worry about eating too little salt. Basically, salt is found in so many unexpected places that even people on low salt diets are still getting plenty. IMO, anyway. I respect your right to see it differently.

https://www.heart.org/en/healthy-liv...-i-eat-per-day
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Old 04-06-2019, 06:28 PM
 
33,917 posts, read 40,670,212 times
Reputation: 29352
You could buy a blood pressure monitor and take your own readings, consistantly high readings could potentialy lead to stroke/heart attack.
https://www.google.ca/search?source=....0.Ys0wXiH7Ls4
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Old 04-06-2019, 06:44 PM
 
4,911 posts, read 10,859,023 times
Reputation: 11473
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piney Creek View Post
Guess we'll have to agree to disagree. I agree with the American Heart Association:


"The American Heart Association has an ideal limit of no more than 1,500 mg per day for most adults."


and

"More than 70 percent of the sodium Americans eat comes from packaged, prepared and restaurant foods — not the salt shaker. On average, Americans eat more than 3,400 milligrams of sodium each day — much more than the American Heart Association and other health organizations recommend. Most of us are likely underestimating how much sodium we eat,

To argue the other side for a moment, they do also say:

"The body needs only a small amount of sodium (less than 500 milligrams per day) to function properly. That’s a mere smidgen — the amount in less than ¼ teaspoon. Very few people come close to eating less than that amount. Plus, healthy kidneys are great at retaining the sodium that your body needs.
There’s no reliable evidence that eating less than 1,500 mg per day of sodium is a risk for the general population. There is some evidence that it could be harmful to certain patients with congestive heart failure."


But, FWIW, I still think the AHA supports my contention that most people don't have to worry about eating too little salt. Basically, salt is found in so many unexpected places that even people on low salt diets are still getting plenty. IMO, anyway. I respect your right to see it differently.

https://www.heart.org/en/healthy-liv...-i-eat-per-day
Well said, in the US it would be near impossible for an adult to get "too little" salt in their diet that isn't a "risk" to every worry about...it is estimated that 90% of Americans get too much salt in their diets well above the RDA...

Too little salt???? Likely an infinitesimal number approaching zero....
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Old 04-06-2019, 08:14 PM
 
5,327 posts, read 4,847,636 times
Reputation: 3750
Quote:
Originally Posted by Good4Nothin View Post
I think it can also be related to upper cervical problems. Did you ever get checked by a chiropractor? Did you ever have a neck injury?
You are awesome. THANK YOU SO MUCH for posting that. Live long and prosper!
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Old 04-06-2019, 10:02 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
22,573 posts, read 27,517,491 times
Reputation: 28170
Salt and BP is complicated. Some people are salt sensitive; some are not.

Are You Salt Sensitive, Risks of Salt Sensitivity | Berkeley Wellness

If your blood pressure is elevated it cannot hurt to cut back on salt and see what happens.
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Old 04-06-2019, 11:52 PM
Status: "Live Free or Diet!" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Lancaster, SC
6,854 posts, read 4,229,310 times
Reputation: 8234
I have several long stays in hospitals over the last few years with sepsis. I am pretty sure my pulse rate if not my blood pressure was higher depending on the nurse or tech who checked both. At one point I was prescribed meds for high blood pressure, but each time the nurse would come in to give them to me, she would want to check blood pressure. I once suggested she might not want to trust the results of one of the techs. Oddly, my blood pressure is normal now, sometimes almost too low
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Old 04-07-2019, 04:09 AM
 
5,704 posts, read 2,604,185 times
Reputation: 14466
I run Low...naturally. So when I recently had an episode of sorts and they did my BP, Not a soul was alarmed . I WAS THOUGH! I explained that I normally run 110/70 ...and that this 140 /over 90 was outside MY COMFORT zone. While it was MY BODY and MY CONCERN, I was rebuffed by the medical team that it was anything to be of concern. What I think is my "norm" doesn't fall in line with the training books. So the only thing I think ONE of us will agree on is when I have NO pulse and NO brain waves, we can both agree that I'm toast!

I'm sure its a given dependent on age, types of exertion, or sedentary habits that can fluctuate the reading....
Heck mine goes up just hearing a certain Leader rant how great he is!
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Old 04-07-2019, 05:56 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
70,947 posts, read 82,202,959 times
Reputation: 40691
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
120/80 is “elevated” bordering on hypertensive. It increases your stroke risk, particularly if you’re older. In 2019, pretty much any male 55+ would be put on a lightweight BP med to knock it down a bit. Just my $0.02.
I think many would argue with you on your statement: 120/80 is bordering on elevated: the 80 maybe, the 120 absolutely not.
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