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Old 04-12-2019, 12:19 PM
 
66 posts, read 20,842 times
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I am 55, with poor eyesight which is nevertheless fully correctable, at least theoretically.

I saw a new optometrist (but same practice) last month for my biennial eye exam. I told her that I had no complaints about my vision, but that my husband regularly remarked that I wasn’t seeing as well as him and that I should see about a new prescription. I also told her that my husband had been saying the same thing on and off for at least the last twenty years — even after I get new glasses. The previous optometrists I had seen (one at that practice and a couple of others elsewhere) had all said that I was corrected to 20/20, however because my prescription was so strong, I still wouldn’t see as well at a distance as someone who naturally had 20/20 vision. This never made any sense to me. But I was satisfied with my almost great corrected vision and didn’t want to make a big deal about it. But now, I told her, I really wanted to get the prescription as good as possible (if for no other reason than to stop my husband’s commenting/nagging.)

She tested me and told me that she could definitely improve my prescription. I got the new prescription, which she said was significantly stronger — at least a half diopter in each eye. (The prescription for the reading part of my bifocals changed too.) I don’t have my prescription at hand, but I remember that it went from something like -10.5 diopters to -11.0 diopters. My astigmatism changed too. (Other than this my eyes were healthy, in fact, she expressed surprise at how healthy they looked given my serious myopia.)

Then I ordered new lenses. They were expensive at $680. (I reused old frames instead of getting new ones.)

Well, imagine my disappointment when I finally got my new glasses and discovered that they were worse than my previous ones. I checked for near and far vision and both were worse. I let the practice know and they told me that my eyes needed at least a week to adjust, but had me come back to see if the frames were correctly adjusted for me. (They were.) They checked for clerical error. (No clerical errors found.) So, I wore them for a week and re-tested myself. They were still worse than my old ones (not quite as bad as the previous week, but still worse.)

So, today I called them again, and the new plan is for me to come back in in three weeks, get another test and order another pair, both free of charge. They told me that my previous prescription only corrected to 20/30 and the new one should be 20/20.

But I am feeling disappointed, pessimistic and puzzled about all this. My questions:

Given that my husband has complained (nicely) about my poor vision for years and years (through quite a few changes of prescription), maybe they just can’t do any better for me than what I already have? Which leads to another question ...

Can optometrists always know in advance that one’s vision isn’t fully correctable, or do they sometimes find out the hard way — by repeatable attempting to correct 20/30 vision and failing to do it?

If they can’t make the lenses better for me, I eventually want a full refund. I already had two spare pairs of glasses. I don’t need a third. They are already starting in with “maybe you just weren’t paying enough attention during the eye exam,” where I know that wasn’t true. I am sensitive and conscientious.

Is it possible that the lens manufacturer thought there were making the correct lens, but somehow they just didn’t come out right? Is it really difficult to make bifocal lenses for someone with such a strong prescription? How frequently do mistakes like this happen? Are people at this level of myopia frequently only corrected to 20/20 in theory, instead of actual fact (and people just don’t notice because they don’t test themselves, just trust their optometrists and opticians, don’t compare their vision with others’, etc., etc., etc.)

One thing that I am also wondering about is has this happened to me before and I just didn’t notice? This is the first time I have really tried to fix the problem hubby has been complaining about and the first time I have compared the new prescription to the old one. Before, I had just assumed that they were at least a little better.

Is there any reason my vision wouldn’t be fully correctable if I just have refraction error and astigmatism and nothing else?

Last edited by Jill_Schramm; 04-12-2019 at 12:21 PM.. Reason: Typo
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Old 04-12-2019, 09:31 PM
 
2,817 posts, read 4,183,484 times
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When you go back for the free re-exam ask to see a different doctor in the practice.


The optometrist I saw last year swore that my prescription was correct. I told her there was something wrong, but she insisted it was correct.


I've been wearing glasses for many decades, and I know when a pair of glasses is correct, or not.


This year I went to a different optometrist, and my new prescription is perfect. What a difference!
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Old 04-12-2019, 09:48 PM
 
66 posts, read 20,842 times
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Great advice! Thanks .... it seems so simple and yet I hadnít thought of that.
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Old 04-12-2019, 10:00 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,845 posts, read 30,026,333 times
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I needed to get glasses to pass my drivers license eye test. When I got them They were so strong I could only wear them for s few minutes before my eyes began watering uncontrollably. When I called the eye clinic they said that I just needed to get "used" to the prescription. I am convinced that they give you a much stronger prescription than necessary to weaken your eyes so that you must realy on glasses more and more. I took my test and then threw them away.
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Old 04-12-2019, 10:00 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
76,306 posts, read 68,376,332 times
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I'm wondering if the lab, where their prescriptions are made, has issues. Some labs are MUCH better than others! It's amazing the difference, when you find a good one. Maybe you need a better-quality lab?
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Old 04-12-2019, 10:06 PM
 
Location: Denver CO
20,388 posts, read 11,182,241 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
I'm wondering if the lab, where their prescriptions are made, has issues. Some labs are MUCH better than others! It's amazing the difference, when you find a good one. Maybe you need a better-quality lab?
I agree with this. I have very bad (but correctable) vision. I see an ophthalmologist and he always asks where I get my Rx filled. I go to local, standalone boutique who sends the Rx to a very reputable lab, and he's ok with that. He is not ok with me going to Costco or any of the big chains, he said they just don't do a good enough job when you need this level of correction. They are fine for people with less complicated Rx, but not for the level I need.

I would go ahead and see another optometrist and let them make new glasses and see what happens. But if that still doesn't work, I would ask for your money back and start over.
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Old 04-13-2019, 08:31 AM
 
66 posts, read 20,842 times
Reputation: 117
I think I may have discovered where the problem lies. I remember that at the beginning of the eye exam, they tested me with my old glasses. I remember that I read the 20/20 line accurately, but said that I needed to really concentrate to do so. They told me to concentrate less and just read what was easy and not try to make out what wasn’t easy. Apparently, it was only the 20/30 line I could read easily, with no concentrated effort and this is what they put down as my level with my then current prescription.

Then we proceeded with the exam. I don’t remember all the details of the exam, although I do remember that it went on for quite some time, longer than I recall other exams taking. I also remember that there was a lot of “is A or B better?” when frankly they seemed almost indistinguishable to me. I also don’t know if she kept on telling me not to concentrate and not to try too hard, but my hunch is that we kind of forgot about that. I do remember that I was trying really hard to puzzle out any difference between A or B.

So, what I think happened is that my old prescription wound up being somewhat artificially noted as worse than it actually was and that the new one was only “better” because I was trying really hard. I’m not really sure about the second part of this, but I am sure of the first part.
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Old 04-13-2019, 09:50 AM
 
51 posts, read 21,561 times
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There are many variables in play.
Are your bifocals lined or progressives? If progressive, are they the same (digital vs non) as you are accustomed to?
Is the material the same as previous glasses?ie hi index vs polycarbonate
We're the measurements matched to previous? This includes pupillary distance as well as optical centers.

For every 10 diopter of power,1 mm of change will require an adjustment in adapting.If glasses slide 1 mm
You are reducing the lens power.
Frame alignment including where and how frames sit on your face affect your vision.

Lifestyle will also make a difference.Just because you refract one way in the office where everything is based on a perfect 20 feet , doesn't mean that's where your real life is based.

You definitely have a significant Rx,however and comparing your vision to someone with no correction is futile.

Hopefully when you return to the OD they will trial frame you so you can see what the Rx is like without the extraneous variables of the glasses.

I could go on and on - your health and any medicines that can affect the Rx throughout the day.
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Old 04-13-2019, 10:56 AM
 
1,211 posts, read 1,509,020 times
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It may be the correction of the astigmatism that is causing a problem. I had a similar issue when I had a drastic change from being nearsighted to being farsighted in one eye (an issue that was the result of having had RK surgery on that eye 19 years prior). The new prescription resulted in double vision in that eye. After double checking the prescription and trying to get used to them for 10 days - I still was experiencing double vision in that one eye.


Doctor went back to the original correction for the astigmatism and from there worked to correct my vision to the best it could be maintaining the original astigmatism correction. That got rid of the double vision. This doctor had done my original eye surgery and yearly eye exams for many years. My eye was not adapting to a new correction for the astigmatism, so, he gave me the best vision he could based upon using the original astigmatism correction.
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Old Yesterday, 05:29 PM
 
66 posts, read 20,842 times
Reputation: 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago2vegas View Post
There are many variables in play.
Are your bifocals lined or progressives? If progressive, are they the same (digital vs non) as you are accustomed to?
Is the material the same as previous glasses?ie hi index vs polycarbonate
We're the measurements matched to previous? This includes pupillary distance as well as optical centers.

For every 10 diopter of power,1 mm of change will require an adjustment in adapting.If glasses slide 1 mm
You are reducing the lens power.
Frame alignment including where and how frames sit on your face affect your vision.

Lifestyle will also make a difference.Just because you refract one way in the office where everything is based on a perfect 20 feet , doesn't mean that's where your real life is based.

You definitely have a significant Rx,however and comparing your vision to someone with no correction is futile.

Hopefully when you return to the OD they will trial frame you so you can see what the Rx is like without the extraneous variables of the glasses.

I could go on and on - your health and any medicines that can affect the Rx throughout the day.
They are progressive bifocals and I believe that they are the same as what I had before. I believe the material was the same too. Iím not sure though, I will have to double check.

I donít know about the measurements.

I am reusing old frames that are identical to my current frames. So both lenses are set in exactly the same frame (I bought two because I liked the frames so much and was afraid theyíd go out of style, which they did. They are no longer available.)

My husband has a correction, although not as severe as mine. Is it also futile to compare myself with those who have a lesser correction? Why is this? Isnít 20/20 the same for everyone.

My health is very good (no problems except for very mild chronic pancreatitis which is usually asymptotic) and I donít take any medications.

I printed off one of those online eye charts, pinned it up in a well lit place and asked my husband how far away he needed to stand to read the 20/20 line. I then stood in exactly the same place and could read the 20/20 line myself ó almost equally well with both the old and the new lenses, the new ones still being slightly worse.

I just feel like, WTF?
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