U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Health and Wellness
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-03-2019, 06:15 PM
 
2,752 posts, read 1,051,417 times
Reputation: 5385

Advertisements

google eye doctors
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-03-2019, 06:17 PM
 
16,018 posts, read 19,421,163 times
Reputation: 26163
Quote:
Originally Posted by slduvall View Post
It can take a couple weeks for new glasses, especially progressives or bi-focals to really become totally unnoticeable. At least it did for me. One day I just wasn't aware of them. Going down stairs was the biggie for me.
I was the same...walking down stairs was frightening until I got used to my bifocals.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-03-2019, 06:47 PM
 
60 posts, read 24,385 times
Reputation: 151
Optometrists have undergrad degree and 4 years optometry school
An exam consists of a refraction,glaucoma check,color blindness etc.
If the optometrist sees anything suspicious he will send you to an ophthalmologist if more than monitoring and prescribing drugs is needed
The refraction is what the glasses Rx is based on
An ophthalmologist has undergrad, med school and post med in ophthalmology
Traditionally they were who you saw for any eye disease or abnormality.especially if surgery was needed.They did refractions more as a courtesy.Often done by a tech and not the dr themselves.
Decades ago optometrists began being allowed to prescribe drugs and treatments.This changed the earlier need to go to an ophthalmologist for things like eye infections or glaucoma treatment.

Back to the thread topic,your optometrist spends a lot of time and attention on getting the best eyeglass/contact lens prescription.The ophthalmologist focuses ( pun intended) on the physiology of the eye.

However as with all professions, the person doing the exam must be diligent

Getting used to the new glasses does take time -the brain needs time to adapt the new messages its receiving.
Having said that, there are many variables in how the glasses could be causing discomfort and you should first see the optician who made the glasses.I am often able to get patients seeing better with an adjustment.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-03-2019, 09:50 PM
 
Location: PVB
3,052 posts, read 1,545,337 times
Reputation: 3490
I ran an Optical company for 45 years and I was an opticians and my dad was an Optometrist

First of all Optometrists are trained to do eye exams and detect eye diseases. They can treat some simple ones like infections. Ophthalmologists are MDs trained in Eye surgery and diseases. Ophthalmologists time for the most part is better spend doing what they were trained for and refractions are a way they spot diseases. Many Ophthalmologists employ Optometrists to do refractions. They both do an excellent job.

As far as glasses go there are many variables that can cause a problem:
1. PD - pupillary distance - the distance between your eyes. If this is incorrect (which is somewhat common) it can induce prism and cause issues. There is monocular (1 eye at a time) which is used mostly for progressives, since your eyes are frequently a different distance from your nose and binocular (both at once). It depends on how off it is or how high your prescription is. Sometimes your previous glasses were made incorrectly and the new ones are correct and you have problems because you got used to the prism on your old ones. The only way to avoid this (and I did this every time and only takes a minute) is to take the PD off your old glasses. When I had patients with improper old glasses, I explained what we were going to do, if they were way off it may take a few pairs to totally correct it a little at a time. This way the patient knew what to expect and we didn't look incompetent by doing things right. In my 40+ years in the business and 10,000 or more patients I only had 1 who had a problem.
2. Vertex distance - the distance between your eyes and the lenses. If this has changed it can cause problems but this is usually only with strong prescriptions
3. Vertical placement - if your eye is not directly in front of the optical center it can cause vertical prism which can make the floor rise
4. Panoscopic and Retroscopic tilts. If your glasses are tilted differently than you are used to it can cause a problem and if the front of the frame is not straight or is curved more than you are used to another problem.
5. Bifocal height - any change in bifocal height or and incorrect bifocal height can cause major problems especially with Progressives.

So you can see there are many variables in glasses and 1 thing can cause a problem. There is nothing worse as an Optician hearing "I can't see out of these". What can you say except to try and figure out whats wrong.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-04-2019, 03:41 AM
 
Location: Eugene, Oregon
8,848 posts, read 2,851,030 times
Reputation: 13011
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jill_Schramm View Post
Yes! I am having a very similar problem. In fact, I started a thread on it here a few weeks ago. I got new lenses in spare frames which which were exactly the same as my current frames. I tried on my new pair and could tell they were worse. Like you, I was told to wait a while (a week) to let my eyes adjust. I did that and, although the new pair was definitely better (my eyes had adjusted some), it was still not better than my old pair. Very disappointing and frustrating, particularly since I paid $680 for the new lenses. (I have a very, very strong prescription.)

I contacted them and am going back to have my eyes re-examined and new lenses made at no additional cost. My appointment is in a couple of weeks. We’ll see.

So, maybe you can wait another few days, then call them back to complain/request another exam & lenses free of charge.
Paying large amounts of money for glasses guarantees you nothing, regarding performance.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-04-2019, 05:29 AM
 
123 posts, read 36,722 times
Reputation: 201
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve McDonald View Post
Paying large amounts of money for glasses guarantees you nothing, regarding performance.
Yes, apparently.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-04-2019, 06:42 AM
 
Location: PVB
3,052 posts, read 1,545,337 times
Reputation: 3490
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve McDonald View Post
Paying large amounts of money for glasses guarantees you nothing, regarding performance.
That is correct. If you have a strong prescription the chances of it being perfect decrease as the prescription rises. If your PD (previously explained) is of 1 or 2 millimeters it can cause lots of prism. I would suggest you take your old lenses back and have them check the PD and base curves and compare to your new ones.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-04-2019, 08:10 AM
 
Location: 49th parallel
2,476 posts, read 1,294,108 times
Reputation: 5096
Thank you, Chicago2vegas and Thundarr457 for your detailed information. Very thoughtful (instead of just being told to google things, which doesn't often bring the information one is looking for). People like me tend to toss terms around without really knowing what the different specialities mean, so this was very helpful, as I actually had gone to my browser to get info - but yours was so much better.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-04-2019, 08:16 AM
 
Location: PVB
3,052 posts, read 1,545,337 times
Reputation: 3490
Quote:
Originally Posted by ndcairngorm View Post
Thank you, Chicago2vegas and Thundarr457 for your detailed information. Very thoughtful (instead of just being told to google things, which doesn't often bring the information one is looking for). People like me tend to toss terms around without really knowing what the different specialities mean, so this was very helpful, as I actually had gone to my browser to get info - but yours was so much better.
Your welcome. I have been in the Optical business my entire life doing every facet. Things are much more technical now and are designed to have less competent people doing things. I had a big following when I worked and even had people come from California who had moved away to get glasses from me. I learned by doing things over and over and learning from some real old times who knew all the tricks.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-04-2019, 10:42 AM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
21,239 posts, read 13,963,068 times
Reputation: 29388
I have been lucky to have had very good eye care for the last 20 years or so. I see an optometrist yearly now that I am older. I've worn glasses for a lifetime--since the third grade, I think. I moved to blended bifocals in the late 1980s.

It should not take many hours to become adjusted to a new, correct, prescription. If the new glasses are bifocals, and you've never had them before, then it might take longer. But I never had more than a day of adjustment on any new prescription. I have nearsightedness, presbyopia, dry eye, and astigmatism. Nowadays I also have major league floaters in one eye.

A good optometrist should test you thoroughly for vision and disease. In many cases the optometrist is the first to diagnose diabetes. They are also able to detect glaucoma and cataract disease. In those cases, you will see either an internist or ophthalmologist. As the years have progressed, I've noticed that the doc is able to do more testing. Since both detached retina and macular degeneration are in my family tree, I appreciate the intensive look at my eyes every year.

Yes! This is expensive. If you are younger and don't have any reason to think you have more problems than nearsightedness or farsightedness, I think you can visit Costco or another, cheaper provider. But, if you are not getting a good product, I think it best to take your business elsewhere. A good optometrist's office can fit you with a minimum of fuss, IME.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Health and Wellness
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. | Please obey Forum Rules | Terms of Use and Privacy Policy

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top