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Old 05-06-2019, 10:21 AM
 
2,707 posts, read 961,560 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scooby Snacks View Post
Where did you get that idea? I worked as a scribe and I never, ever heard such a complaint. Moreover, many, if not most, doctors require an assistant in the room with them due to liability issues. However, I detested the scribe duties because I think a doctor should take their own notes. When I was assigned that task at that clinic, I was promised it would be temporary, so I did it for a while but they never reassigned it to someone else so I changed jobs. I agree the EMR is a ridiculous requirement. Despite our addiction to computers, cell phones, and apps, there are times when paper is better. And interestingly, some doctors offices also have paper charts. Strangely enough, in order to file for reimbursement with Medicaid, such claims must be mailed or faxed. They cannot be submitted electronically. I'm still scratching my head about that.
Where did I get that idea? Personal experience and that of friends. For example I won't allow a scribe to be present when I'm standing there naked getting a full skin exam from my dermatologist.
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Old 05-06-2019, 10:42 AM
 
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While the research is limited, it has shown scribes lessen patient satisfaction. (Per a Google Scholar query.)


Speaking personally, I am so accoustomed to my various providers using the EMR while conducting the interview portion, I am not at bothered by it. I've never had a provider stop a physical to go back to their computer and enter info into the EMR.
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Old 05-06-2019, 10:53 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,606 posts, read 6,870,460 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scooby Snacks View Post
Correct. You fill the claim form out on the computer, print it out on the computer, then fax the forms you just filled out or mail the entire packet in. It is very inefficient. Now I'm just speaking of Medicaid Alaska claim forms. It may be different for other states, but in any event, it is a very inefficient system as are many government things.

LOL, and it'd be so easy just to email that completed form as an attached document to the Medicaid Claim department, but why do it the easy way?

A variation on the old joke. "How many guv'mint employees does it take to change a light bulb? Takes 11. One to screw in the light bulb and 10 to turn the ladder".

I'm a retired state employee. Things could be done a tad more efficiently than in the federal government (depending on the whims of the beancounter in charge, sometimes). We did a lot of work with and for the federal government, and the sheer inefficiency of the way they insisted things be done were a source of frustration, but they didn't want suggestions from the worker bees.

But I guess I'm not surprised at the way those documents are handled in the Alaska Medicaid office.
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Old 05-06-2019, 11:37 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Travelassie View Post
LOL, and it'd be so easy just to email that completed form as an attached document to the Medicaid Claim department, but why do it the easy way?

A variation on the old joke. "How many guv'mint employees does it take to change a light bulb? Takes 11. One to screw in the light bulb and 10 to turn the ladder".

I'm a retired state employee. Things could be done a tad more efficiently than in the federal government (depending on the whims of the beancounter in charge, sometimes). We did a lot of work with and for the federal government, and the sheer inefficiency of the way they insisted things be done were a source of frustration, but they didn't want suggestions from the worker bees.

But I guess I'm not surprised at the way those documents are handled in the Alaska Medicaid office.

Having worked in medical billing in the past, whether a form is faxed/mailed or e-filed is up to the state. For example, both NY and PA offer e-submissions.
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Old 05-06-2019, 11:42 AM
 
Location: on the wind
6,431 posts, read 2,573,642 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mike1003 View Post
I just visited a new specialist twice. Both times other than shaking my hand and the obligated laying on the stethoscope, his entire time was looking at his screen and typing.
Well, before the computer they were scribbling notes by hand. They could be just as dismissive doing this as looking at a screen. I think the provider's manner plays into this a lot. The method by which they record information is a detail. Having to transpose hasty notes involves one more hand which increases the chance for error. Being able to send orders to other staff, a pharmacy, or generate a referral directly seems efficient and also less likely to create errors. Obviously experience and skills matter.

The last few times I've been to a provider they either had a scribe (but asked if I minded; I don't) or had a computer, but used it to record what we had decided or tests/procedures they needed to order. One surgeon took notes by hand and made me copies after the consult was over. She used the desktop to pull up imagery, research study results, or look up technical information on the web.

Some things I do appreciate about the computer is being able to pull up previous history, labwork, prescriptions and supplements, other health conditions, allergies, details about my insurance coverage, etc. faster than flipping through a hard copy chart or faster than I can recall them myself.
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Old 05-06-2019, 11:45 AM
 
2,006 posts, read 984,534 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TFW46 View Post
Not only is dictating notes not as efficient, but it can also be disturbing if the doctor does it right in front of the patient. I remember going to a cardiologist about 20 years ago -- he dictated his notes about our visit right in front of me and dictated some observations about the condition of my heart that almost gave me another heart attack right then. I found another cardiologist, who had a little more compassion, right away. Who needs that stress?

They mostly dictated outside the exam room...after work, during lunch, etc. A few did dictate in the exam room, but most did not. I never had one dictate in the exam room.
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Old 05-07-2019, 07:38 AM
 
12,817 posts, read 15,231,477 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mike1003 View Post
I just visited a new specialist twice. Both times other than shaking my hand and the obligated laying on the stethoscope, his entire time was looking at his screen and typing.
yes...it's very disconcerting...it's very hard to talk to a doctor whose not looking at you, and typing while you speak....makes me feel that they might not hear what I'm saying....
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Old 05-07-2019, 07:48 AM
 
10,152 posts, read 9,232,368 times
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My PCP refuses to use a computer and brings the patient's file folder into the exam room. I have no idea if his office staff is inputting the info into the system after I leave.

I asked if he was going to switch over to having a laptop in front of him and he said, "Nope!"

He's one of those doctors who takes his time with each patient to ensure he covers all the bases and communicates with each patient. He is never in a rush to get out of the room.

He is not 'test happy', nor is he 'pill happy'.

Have been his patient for 24 years and every one of his diagnoses has been spot on.
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Old 05-07-2019, 08:24 AM
 
Location: Surfside Beach, SC
2,039 posts, read 2,589,218 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Biker53 View Post
Where did I get that idea? Personal experience and that of friends. For example I won't allow a scribe to be present when I'm standing there naked getting a full skin exam from my dermatologist.
That's very bizarre! I've never heard of any doctor or other health care professional (and I've been one for over 40 years) have a patient totally naked for any kind of exam. Even for a pelvic or breast exam, you aren't naked.

I certainly don't blame you for not wanting a scribe in the room.
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Old 05-07-2019, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Houston, TX
14,253 posts, read 8,217,548 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scooby Snacks View Post
Where did you get that idea? I worked as a scribe and I never, ever heard such a complaint. Moreover, many, if not most, doctors require an assistant in the room with them due to liability issues. However, I detested the scribe duties because I think a doctor should take their own notes. When I was assigned that task at that clinic, I was promised it would be temporary, so I did it for a while but they never reassigned it to someone else so I changed jobs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Biker53 View Post
Where did I get that idea? Personal experience and that of friends. For example I won't allow a scribe to be present when I'm standing there naked getting a full skin exam from my dermatologist.
Quote:
Originally Posted by vrexy View Post
That's very bizarre! I've never heard of any doctor or other health care professional (and I've been one for over 40 years) have a patient totally naked for any kind of exam. Even for a pelvic or breast exam, you aren't naked.

I certainly don't blame you for not wanting a scribe in the room.
I know, right? I've worked in healthcare for 15 years, been a patient for decades, and took my grandma to the derm when she had severe skin cancer all over her body, as well as done dermatology treatments for a long term skin condition myself, and neither of us were naked. We had that lame paper own and were uncovered a little at a time. I have also had numerous pelvic exams. No nakedness there either. It may depend on geography, but in my experience, the scribe thing is still relatively uncommon. However, medical assistants and nurses are widely used in exam rooms, no matter what the patient wants. Doctors do not want to be accused of raping patients.
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