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Old 05-04-2019, 09:44 PM
 
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I recently saw a doctor who spend 80% of the visit looking at his computer!


Why Doctors Hate Their Computers
Digitization promises to make medical care easier and more efficient. But are screens coming between doctors and patients?

Atul Gawande

A system that promised to increase my mastery over my work has, instead, increased my work’s mastery over me. I’m not the only one.
Moderator cut: too long a quote
https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2...heir-computers

Last edited by SouthernBelleInUtah; 05-04-2019 at 10:17 PM..
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Old 05-05-2019, 08:03 AM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
26,611 posts, read 5,615,380 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cida View Post
I recently saw a doctor who spend 80% of the visit looking at his computer!


Why Doctors Hate Their Computers
Digitization promises to make medical care easier and more efficient. But are screens coming between doctors and patients?

Atul Gawande

A system that promised to increase my mastery over my work has, instead, increased my works mastery over me. Im not the only one.
Moderator cut: too long a quote
https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2...heir-computers

Same here.....held the thing in his hands the entire visit.....typing away.
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Old 05-05-2019, 08:14 AM
 
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Its been my experience that doctors look at their computers for information on your blood tests,your medications,your medical history, ,proper course of action on your treatment.
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Old 05-05-2019, 08:32 AM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
26,611 posts, read 5,615,380 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jambo101 View Post
Its been my experience that doctors look at their computers for information on your blood tests,your medications,your medical history, ,proper course of action on your treatment.
Yes but some also type in their comments and recommendations while you sit there...can make you feel ignored.
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Old 05-05-2019, 10:47 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,646 posts, read 6,928,612 times
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Most of the docs I've seen have reviewed results and/or history on their tablets, or computer, before turning their attention to me with questions, explanations, physical exam or what have you. Or they're looking at the screen, but are able to engage with the patient at the same time, and at least make it seem as though the patient has their undivided attention.

I can imagine there are those who spend most of their time with patients with their noses in the screen, without even looking much at the patients, let alone touching them. That would put me off too, fortunately I haven't run across that myself.

I had an interesting doctor visit recently that made me realize the advantages of electronic medical records, and appreciate the ability with which some doctors are able to navigate and use the information in a patient's records during a routine visit to engage with the patient, make clinical decisions and document the entire encounter immediately afterwords.

This was an initial visit to a cardiac electrophysiologist to whom I had been referred by my regular cardiologist-both in the same large practice, so all my records were available to this guy. He must have spent at least some time prior to my visit looking at my records, which included a number of ekg's, monitoring reports, which gave him a pretty good idea of the problems I was having. After I went through my history schpiel when he asked about it, he informed me what he believed was going on with my arrythmia issues (not exactly what I wanted to hear but it is what it is). He showed me a number of ekg i mages on the computer screen, as he measured RP and PR-(whatever) intervals and wierd "p"waves he explained why he believed the mechanism of the tachycardia was another type from the one I had always assumed it to be. This old lady (who spent many years in the pre-internet age) found it amazing that I could mention specific episodes I had had a few years ago, and if I had sought treatment and they had documentation the doc could bring up those records as we spoke, and knew exactly what had gone on at the time.


We discussed a number of treatment and management issues, what might work and what likely wouldn't and why, future interventions and (kind of eye opening to me, but I should have known), how the consequences would not be so great if I didn't get this and my blood pressure under control. As in, a-fib, cardiomyopathy, and heart failure.

And at the end of the visit, the doc dictated his assessments from the visit-exactly what we had talked about, right into the records. Took him maybe two minutes. As I read the copy of the records from this visit, which also included future appointments, changes to medication and so on, I realized these records included the best documentation I've ever seen of such an office visit.
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Old 05-05-2019, 11:34 AM
 
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That's how they see your existing information, how they input your current information, and how they input your prescriptions. They do look at you when they're actually examining you, but their documentation is done on the computer during the visit. My doctors have been doing that for the last 10 years or so, nothing new.
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Old 05-05-2019, 11:58 AM
 
2,759 posts, read 983,785 times
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Insurance companies, hospital administrators and the feds are the ones who imposed the electronic records systems that physicians are now burdened with. The alternative to the physician inputting the data during your visit is their having a scribe in the room during your exam recording it. Some patients are uncomfortable speaking freely in front of a scribe. Some are uncomfortable having certain exams in front of a scribe, so they're not necessarily the answer either.

Welcome to the modern world of medicine.
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Old 05-05-2019, 12:04 PM
 
9,213 posts, read 6,147,578 times
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I just visited a new specialist twice. Both times other than shaking my hand and the obligated laying on the stethoscope, his entire time was looking at his screen and typing.
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Old 05-05-2019, 12:16 PM
 
34,177 posts, read 41,117,869 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Biker53 View Post
Insurance companies, hospital administrators and the feds are the ones who imposed the electronic records systems that physicians are now burdened with. The alternative to the physician inputting the data during your visit is their having a scribe in the room during your exam recording it. Some patients are uncomfortable speaking freely in front of a scribe. Some are uncomfortable having certain exams in front of a scribe, so they're not necessarily the answer either.

Welcome to the modern world of medicine.
So you think doctors should memorize all pertinant medical information on all their patients.
Unless the doc is playing video games on his computer i have no problem with the doctors i see using their computers to benefit my maladies.
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Old 05-05-2019, 12:26 PM
 
2,108 posts, read 1,031,597 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Biker53 View Post
Insurance companies, hospital administrators and the feds are the ones who imposed the electronic records systems that physicians are now burdened with. The alternative to the physician inputting the data during your visit is their having a scribe in the room during your exam recording it. Some patients are uncomfortable speaking freely in front of a scribe. Some are uncomfortable having certain exams in front of a scribe, so they're not necessarily the answer either.

Welcome to the modern world of medicine.

Doctors used to dictate their notes at the end of the day, after seeing all the patients, and then a transcriptionist would transcribe the notes to enter in the patient charts. Apparently that's not as efficient as entering all the information directly into the chart themselves via computer during each appointment.
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