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Old 09-07-2019, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Southern California
24,947 posts, read 8,802,729 times
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A friend was talking about this a couple weeks ago as she heard about it from someone who also deals with knee issues.

https://www.aarp.org/health/conditio...native-fd.html

I have a hard time fathoming this as how will one bend after being cemented.
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Old 09-07-2019, 03:16 PM
 
Location: on the wind
7,816 posts, read 3,286,476 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaminhealth View Post
A friend was talking about this a couple weeks ago as she heard about it from someone who also deals with knee issues.

https://www.aarp.org/health/conditio...native-fd.html

I have a hard time fathoming this as how will one bend after being cemented.
Sounds like the material is injected into the existing bone of the femur head and the pelvic socket, not into the space between the bones. That would make no sense at all. Instead of replacing the damaged bone with something like titanium, a plastic, or ceramics, the material "fills in" and strengthens the existing damaged bony tissue and allows new healthy bone to grow in over time. It doesn't regrow cartilage. When that's gone, its gone. Sounds like what it would do is reduce the amount of irritated inflamed bone (that gets rubbed and abraded because the cartilage cushion is gone) with bone that is not. There is no artificial implant to wear out, just strengthened natural bone, and hopefully bone that is more resistant to ongoing irritation. What the article doesn't explain is how this new bone would stand up to use over time. The joint's cartilage cushion is still missing. None of that was replaced.

Hopefully you noticed that the procedure also involves cleaning up the joint itself...re-shaping the joint surfaces, trimming away bony spurs, removing remnants of damaged cartilage that can snag and pinch causing pain. As has been explained to you multiple times before, lack of cartilage does not make a joint stiff, inflammation, smaller bits of damaged cartilage that get pinched, bony spur formation, and not using the joint because you are afraid of pain does.
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Old 09-07-2019, 03:18 PM
 
9,796 posts, read 6,471,138 times
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https://wexnermedical.osu.edu/mediar...lasty-vasileff



Quote:
“We want to preserve the native hip whenever possible because once you have a hip replacement, there’s no going back,” said Dr. Kelton Vasileff, an orthopedic surgeon at Ohio State Wexner Medical Center. “We’re able to use a bone-hardening procedure that’s traditionally been used in knee surgery to help repair a patient’s own hip joint.”

During the procedure, a bone substitute material is injected into a small hole in the joint, filling any voids or lesions in the bone. Over the few years following surgery, a patient’s body replaces the bone-hardening material with their own healthy bone, leading to what Vasileff hopes are permanent repairs.

“In the past, a replacement would be the only long-term option for a lot of patients, but this procedure allows me to add support to the bone, making more damage-reversing surgeries possible,” said Vasileff, who specializes in hip preservation surgery.

Subchondroplasty May Delay Hip Replacement Surgery for Some



https://www.consultant360.com/conten...t-surgery-some


Subchondroplasty – Is It Right For You?



https://www.jeffreybergmd.com/subcho...right-for-you/
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Old 09-07-2019, 03:24 PM
 
Location: Southern California
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BTW: I'm not posting this for me.. Just asking if others know of it. Thanks.
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Old 09-09-2019, 03:07 PM
 
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I've heard of vertebroplasty...where they inject a bone cement into fractured vertebrae.....sounds similar....
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Old 09-09-2019, 03:58 PM
 
2,424 posts, read 1,229,355 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaminhealth View Post

I have a hard time fathoming this as how will one bend after being cemented.

It's a bone graft substance, not actually cement.
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Old 09-10-2019, 02:25 PM
 
6,640 posts, read 3,450,986 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgardener View Post
It's a bone graft substance, not actually cement.
Don’t they get it from ground up bones— my back surgeon said it’s from cadaver bones.
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Old 09-10-2019, 06:55 PM
 
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The AARP article is misleading and clearly written by someone that doesn't understand what subchondroplasty is...

What is ISN'T is an alternative to Hip Replacement Surgery.

What it IS is a treatment for bone marrow lesions and insufficiency fractures.

The bone substitute is injected into these bone marrow lesions....does nothing for the cartilage that is affected by arthritis and if a patient has arthritis pain from degenerated cartilage the procedure will do nothing for them.
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Old 09-10-2019, 07:31 PM
 
2,424 posts, read 1,229,355 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mountainrose View Post
Don’t they get it from ground up bones— my back surgeon said it’s from cadaver bones.
If they use Accufill, it is synthetic. "Accufill Injectable Calcium Phosphateis a synthetic, biocompatible bone graft substitute material that forms apoorly crystallinehydroxyapatiteat body temperature." http://subchondroplasty.com/docs/50-..._Creations.pdf

Some bone graft material is from cadavers, some is from cows, some is synthetic.

I was just saying that it's not actual cement, as the OP seemed to think.
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Old Today, 08:21 AM
 
1,515 posts, read 741,368 times
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I know someone who had rooster comb injected in their knees. They had good results.
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