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Old 11-20-2019, 11:19 PM
 
9,605 posts, read 12,534,106 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Don in Austin View Post
No, it is not rocket science. That is why I am disappointed when it is not done correctly.
I have some medical conditions from my military service that requires on going treatments. One of the requirement is a cardiac exam periodically to determine if the condition has morphed.

Each time I go to the cardiologist, he takes my BP as soon as I come into the office. He knows fully well that I park at the end of the parking lot, walk to the building and use the stairs instead of the elevator. Without fail, my BP is always high and he ends up taking another BP towards the end of the exam where it's usually closer to normal.

When this first happened, I asked why he took it at the start knowing that I walked and climbed stairs so the BP would probably read high. His response was that a normal person, who has not done any extra physical exertion should not be reading overly high unless suffering from a serious case of white coat syndrome. He was adamant that normal office visit activities would not overly raise a person's BP too high. In my case, he said he is less concern with the initial high reading and is looking more at how quickly the BP returned to normal.

Considering your readings, have you and the doctor discussed the meaning of the different readings?
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Old Yesterday, 02:26 AM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
11,277 posts, read 21,210,607 times
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I have a very accurate wrist cuff that I use at home. I take it to appointments. If their reading seems off, I offer to take it with my cuff. It also has a memory feature, so I can show them what it usually is at home.
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Old Yesterday, 05:53 AM
 
Location: PRC
3,260 posts, read 3,367,975 times
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You remember the old long metal mercury blood pressure guages attached to a cuff? These are supposed to be the most accurate I believe, but they have to be calibrated every maybe 6 months or so to keep them reading accurately. Dont know how the new electronic ones are calibrated after they leave the factory.

In the clinic near me, we have an electronic BP machine you place your whole arm into - almost like you are going to do arm-wrestling and it can be used by anyone who comes in. There is also a nurse around that area who you can ask if you need to. Weighing scales are just inside the door too. But, of course, things are different here.

Interestingly, each year in the summer, we have students from the nearby TCM university who sit on the street at different places and catch passers-by to get practice in taking BP readings. They use the old long metal box mecury ones even now.
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Old Yesterday, 06:02 AM
 
1,418 posts, read 655,038 times
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Absolutely. For over 10 years I have had readings less than 120/80. So I safely have an idea of what my BP is over a long period of time.

I went to the doctor in April and it came back 154/90. I mentioned this to my doctor as it concerned me.. she goes.. well probably just white coat. I told her I didn't accept that and I didn't want this on my medical record if it wasn't correct. She got out the BP again and it came back at 120/80. Well frankly I feel she was just lying to shut me up. But, later on I had it done at a minute clinic and it was 110/70.

So I am starting to feel that everyone perhaps was just lying or perhaps wasn't sure what the BP was and just went with the records.

Sometimes when I go to someone who doesn't have my records I get strange readings.

Imagine, which is what I am staring to think is true, is if BP readings are not accurate.
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Old Yesterday, 06:53 AM
 
17,994 posts, read 4,801,081 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgardener View Post
Oh for pete's sake. I've had my blood pressure taken at least 1000 times in a doctor's office, and it is completely accurate every time. It's not rocket science.


Sit down and wait a few minutes before having it taken, which is normal and common practice.
The OP is correct for this - and other - reasons.

MANY MANY people have "white coat fever". That is, they are closed in the little doctors cubicle and (in my case) asked a bunch of rapid fire questions (including personal ones) by the Nurse before the BP...or they have something else on their mind....which raises their BP.

This happened to me last week. I am a very private person and even though I had answered all questions on the paper form the Nurse rapid-fired them at me "when did you take your last pill?" and stuff like that. For whatever reason (my personality), my heartbeat increased and so did my BP.

Most of the time I go and my BP is normal....and I do 2-4 times a year just for wellness (am healthy). The last couple of times I went I think I got my back up because they are starting to pry as far as my pain meds (very very light - like 50mg tramadol) and other things. It pisses me off because I spend my entire life working for myself and never had anyone question me about anything (that is, act as if they know better then me)....

My doc is a good guy but I am afraid the "War on Pain Meds" and other ways of treating adults like children are taking a toll on the doctor/patient relationship. If this continues I will go back to once a year or less because I am healthy and don't need to go as often.

But, yeah, lots of people...obviously not you..experience "fight or flight" in medical settings and that would make BP rise.
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Old Yesterday, 07:41 AM
 
5,457 posts, read 5,377,472 times
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My BP is never higher even after I take it right after being active. But I know for a lot of people that is certainly the case.

OP, are they mostly using a machine to do the BP readings? Every time my husband goes to the doctor's office and they use the automatic, it's slightly high. Then the doctor comes in and says he doesn't trust it, does it himself, and it's normal.

I find that in offices, they often are taking BPs in a way they do not teach you to take BPs---like they usually tell you to sit and have your feet flat on the floor (my feet are always dangling), to have your arm rested in a certain way on a flat surface (my arm is just sitting there, because I am often already sitting up on the examination bed/table when they are doing this), to not have clothing in the way (some places say it's okay, leave it and others don't.), etc. Thus far, none of these things have impacted my readings because my BP runs lower than most people I know but I am sure for other people it does.
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Old Yesterday, 08:16 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia/South Jersey area
3,025 posts, read 1,521,449 times
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ok op do you have any statistical proof outside of you, that "almost every time bp is done it's done incorrectly"??

lol, I trust my nurse a hell of a lot more than these wild hyperbole statements made here.

now as you probably are aware, the same person can get two wildly different bp readings by doing simple things like rushing, lying down or standing up.

Now since I don't have any underlying medical issues my bp is taken more as a "baseline" reading. If he got a reading that is wildly off, they will simply do another a bit later. If I had an underlying heart issue then the emphasis would be a bit different.
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Old Yesterday, 09:13 AM
 
15,522 posts, read 31,831,344 times
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I have had same experience at doctor's office, especially after he hired what I felt was an extremely inept assistant. I got OUTRAGEOUSLY high #s, yet everywhere else it is always normal, 120/80 or less. I was recently in the hospital for a few days and it was always less than that. Then a follow-up at another doctor's office and normal - 120/80. I think in the busy GPs office they rush you in and out and don't always take a reading properly.
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Old Yesterday, 09:40 AM
 
1,749 posts, read 2,385,175 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eliza61nyc View Post
ok op do you have any statistical proof outside of you, that "almost every time bp is done it's done incorrectly"??

lol, I trust my nurse a hell of a lot more than these wild hyperbole statements made here.

now as you probably are aware, the same person can get two wildly different bp readings by doing simple things like rushing, lying down or standing up.

Now since I don't have any underlying medical issues my bp is taken more as a "baseline" reading. If he got a reading that is wildly off, they will simply do another a bit later. If I had an underlying heart issue then the emphasis would be a bit different.

I don 't have statistical proof. This has been my experience for decades. OK hyperbolic a little.
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Old Yesterday, 10:26 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
73,322 posts, read 85,508,053 times
Reputation: 43551
Quote:
Originally Posted by Don in Austin View Post
Today I went to my new GP because various specialists who have been treating me think I should have a GP. Got taken straight into the exam room and the blood pressure cuff was put on immediately. 151/124

I calmly told the nurse that those numbers were totally bogus, I take my blood pressure frequently -- having had heart issues -- and those numbers are wildly wrong. I sit down and relax and, if the numbers are a little high, I wait and take my BP again. It is always less than 120/ less than 80. The results were always in this somewhat low range, sometimes as low as 108/72 when I had to spend time in a specialized nursing facility and was bed-ridden. She did not like hearing this but I was stating simple truth. I confronted the doctor about it and got the lame excuse of time restraints, but she did agree to have my BP taken again towards the end of the visit. 124/81 which is actually a little high for me but I was annoyed, had fasted for bloodwork and had consumed only black coffee that morning.

This has been my almost universal experience with how blood pressure readings are done at the doctor's office. One time a sleep dentist used a cuff on my wrist and came up with 165/I forget. They never could get a lower reading. I checked it at home, I checked it at the pharmacy of a supermarket and the numbers were perfectly healthy. I did hear a comment. "Yeah... it has been reading a little high."

Trying to stay fit in my old age I took four flights of stairs to a doctor's office the other day.and the blood pressure cuff was on within minutes. I don't think that reading was very accurate.

It would be much easier if they would ask, "Do you know what your typical blood pressure is?" Than we wouldn't have a figure that is egregiously wrong.

I don't think it is "white coat syndrome" because if I force them to give me a chance to wind down a little the numbers are always much better. This morning I was giving the office the benefit of the doubt that the reading might be a little high but not wildly so.

I don't think there is a valid excuse for this sloppiness and laziness. If the excuse is that the BP reading is not relevant to the visit -- but which it surely is for a general physical, as I went in for today -- then no reading should be taken.

Sad when the patient seems to know more than the "medical professional."




Sorry I have to say: BS. maybe you were suffering from white coat syndrome or something Of course the BP might be slightly off but for the most part, the readings are pretty accurate most of the time.
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