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Old 11-22-2019, 02:55 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
23,831 posts, read 15,395,234 times
Reputation: 34432

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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgardener View Post
Oh for pete's sake. I've had my blood pressure taken at least 1000 times in a doctor's office, and it is completely accurate every time. It's not rocket science.


Sit down and wait a few minutes before having it taken, which is normal and common practice.
Mine is almost always higher at the doctor’s office.
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Old 11-22-2019, 05:44 PM
 
1,755 posts, read 2,390,978 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by matisse12 View Post
Don in Austin, I know exactly what you are saying in your original post and after, and I agree!
Thank you!
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Old 11-22-2019, 05:53 PM
 
1,755 posts, read 2,390,978 times
Reputation: 2700
Quote:
Originally Posted by LLCNYC View Post
What is the point of all this? Walk out of a cardiologists office because of an "off" BP? What is the issue? They take mine and it's always a little high. They know that. I know that...carry on.

When I first had a heart attack (I've had a few, premature onset of CAD), I would call my Dr. every time my BP was "off" eventually he said "stop taking it everyday." Lol.

If you're BP is usually normal, who cares what it is at the Dr. office? I don't get it...This whole thing is baffling to me.



It is baffling to me why a medical professional would administer a test in an egregiously incorrect manner producing a wildly incorrect result that becomes part of my medical record. My reading was much more than "a little high." 145/90 something vs. at home 114/74. Latter is typical.


Seems to me a cardiologist should know what your blood pressure really is.



Should have walked out because my concern with the inaccuracy of the BP test was summarily dismissed. At least when it happened at a different doctor's office the day before they offered to take it again at the end of the appointment.
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Old 11-22-2019, 05:58 PM
 
1,755 posts, read 2,390,978 times
Reputation: 2700
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthofHere View Post
Then arrive earlier and relax. Don't arrive just in time to be called in, instead arrive 15 mins before. Also, don't take the stairs if that elevates your blood pressure when visiting the doctor, get your exercise after the visit.

I had to walk down a long hallway to get to the exam room. Having a recent knee replacement makes walking a little more exertion than it otherwise would be. In any case, a long walk is enough to raise your blood pressure for a while. I did arrive early and always do. Had they taken my blood pressure where I was seated in the waiting room, I have no doubt it would have been under 120/under 80.
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Old 11-22-2019, 06:04 PM
 
1,755 posts, read 2,390,978 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by notnamed View Post
You're just stressed out, and with these thoughts likely significantly contributing to that. Before being put on blood pressure meds they would have you test at home and bring in your home tester to compare to the office reading back to back.
I might be stressed out, but if I can prevail on staff to take the reading again after I have been still for a little while it is always lower. I am afraid you are wrong about what the doctor would do. He said that having suffered sudden cardiac arrest I needed to be on a statin and three blood pressure meds. This was stated as a blanket generic recommendation, with no reference to my cholesterol levels or actual blood pressure. I have scrips for them but they won't be filled. I am going to go to a a different cardiologist.
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Old 11-22-2019, 09:48 PM
 
5,931 posts, read 2,605,881 times
Reputation: 16493
Quote:
Originally Posted by Don in Austin View Post
It is baffling to me why a medical professional would administer a test in an egregiously incorrect manner producing a wildly incorrect result that becomes part of my medical record. My reading was much more than "a little high." 145/90 something vs. at home 114/74. Latter is typical.


Seems to me a cardiologist should know what your blood pressure really is.



Should have walked out because my concern with the inaccuracy of the BP test was summarily dismissed. At least when it happened at a different doctor's office the day before they offered to take it again at the end of the appointment.
And? Why does it really matter what's recorded?

All MDs (who dont even take the reading) know BPs can be off, first thing. If the number really alarmed them, they would retake it. 145/90 isn't the end of the world either...

Unless someone has a significant issue, taking BPs everyday really isn't necessary. Even once in the hospital when my BP was death level high, no one panicked. They gave me meds.
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Old 11-22-2019, 10:27 PM
 
Location: colorado springs, CO
5,907 posts, read 2,625,861 times
Reputation: 18842
As an RN, I actually prefer to use an old fashioned sphygmomanometer with the dial on it that you pump up by hand & use a stethoscope to take BPs, rather than the digital ones.

Those digital ones pump up too tightly & they can be painful. That's enough to raise a BP right there.
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Old Yesterday, 12:10 AM
 
20,947 posts, read 11,751,857 times
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If you're taking your own readings at home at a couple of times a day and have a consistent record, tell that to the doctor. Most will accept your data.
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Old Yesterday, 07:54 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
10,134 posts, read 7,380,121 times
Reputation: 15324
Quote:
Originally Posted by coschristi View Post
As an RN, I actually prefer to use an old fashioned sphygmomanometer with the dial on it that you pump up by hand & use a stethoscope to take BPs, rather than the digital ones.

Those digital ones pump up too tightly & they can be painful. That's enough to raise a BP right there.
And that's how they take blood pressures in both my PCP and cardiologists' ( both the EP and regular) offices.
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Old Yesterday, 07:56 AM
 
1,419 posts, read 656,709 times
Reputation: 2745
Quote:
Originally Posted by LLCNYC View Post
And? Why does it really matter what's recorded?
Why have a record at all then.. what does it matter?

It matters to me that the things doctors are going to be looking at in determining treatment is wrong.. and if I want to get insurance they look at your records -- you have to volunteer to send them over.
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