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Old 08-04-2020, 08:40 AM
 
4,641 posts, read 2,888,508 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arya Stark View Post
But cognitive issues and stains is just made up?

Social Isolation "linked" (there is that word again) is just extroverts trying to pathologize anyone who is an introvert.

I'm an introvert and that's freekin redonkulous. Nobody is picking on introverts.
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Old 08-04-2020, 09:14 AM
 
Location: A coal patch in Northern Appalachia
8,902 posts, read 8,983,513 times
Reputation: 11051
Quote:
Originally Posted by blisterpeanuts View Post
But people ate plenty of sugar and white bread back in the 1930s-40s and earlier. A lot of the commercial veggies were tainted with pesticides like arsenic and DDT. Farm animals ate this stuff too. Pollution in the cities was bad: coal, gasoline, oil, wood were all burned with zero filtering.

And everyone smoked. Everyone.

It's true that people walked more, rode bikes, shoveled/raked their yards with manual tools. Kids walked or rode bikes to school. But the Boomers invented jogging and jazzercise and exercycles, so...
I think you have a few exaggerations in your post. There was never a time when everyone smoked. According to these graphs, male smoking in the U.S. never exceeded 55% and female smoking never exceeded 35%.

When you state that, "It's true that people walked more, rode bikes...," this was only true for young people. It was rare to see an adult before around 1975, walking or riding a bike. I can count a only a few examples of adults who walked somewhere when I was growing up in the 1960s. The idea of doing anything for exercise was just not something that the pre-Boomer generations did.

I agree that kids walked and rode bikes a lot more in those days, but not adults. I walked to school and back all through elementary school, and walked home and back for lunch. Not many kids do that today.

It is true that many people born post-1955 have exercised much more than previous generations, and have been more health conscious. At the same time many more or these people are obese and suffer from diabetes than previous generations.
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Old 08-04-2020, 10:19 AM
 
88 posts, read 43,718 times
Reputation: 254
Well, my father (born 1927) always referred to television as "the idiot box".
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Old 08-04-2020, 11:04 AM
 
6,843 posts, read 3,251,604 times
Reputation: 15913
I had too stop a statin, I was taking.....muscle aches, and yes confusion
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Old 08-04-2020, 12:14 PM
 
2,506 posts, read 1,394,574 times
Reputation: 9916
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arya Stark View Post
But cognitive issues and stains is just made up?

Social Isolation "linked" (there is that word again) is just extroverts trying to pathologize anyone who is an introvert.
Yep. The social isolation link may apply to extroverts who thrived on being social butterflies most of their lives, but what about introverts who preferred limited social interactions from a fairly early age? I don't buy that maintaining the same patterns would suddenly lead to increased memory issues in older age.

As for statins, I've read several times that, over time, they deplete important nutrients like coq10 and b vitamins, deficiency of which can cause memory loss. The FDA also updated its info: safety information for statins to include memory loss, forgetfulness, and confusion as possible risks, or side effects of taking statins.
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Old 08-04-2020, 12:40 PM
 
13,025 posts, read 9,021,259 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by villageidiot1 View Post
When you state that, "It's true that people walked more, rode bikes...," this was only true for young people. It was rare to see an adult before around 1975, walking or riding a bike. I can count a only a few examples of adults who walked somewhere when I was growing up in the 1960s. The idea of doing anything for exercise was just not something that the pre-Boomer generations did.
I have noticed this in my own family. My parents were born in the 1920s, just at the end of the "Greatest Generation" era. They never did anything particular for exercise and they drove everywhere. I rarely remember them even taking a walk much less riding a bike, although they did a little non-strenuous yard and house work. Yet, they were thin and healthy.
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Old 08-04-2020, 12:47 PM
 
Location: Massachusetts
304 posts, read 110,431 times
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I think people in the past didn't "work out" deliberately, but instead their lives included lots of routine exercise that many have lost track of. For example, when I was growing up in the 1960s most of the middle class homes in our neighborhood had one car, which the dad might have taken to work each day. Subsequently, the moms all walked more than a mile to the Grand Union supermarket with little carts. Kids would be enlisted to carry a bag if a large load was expected. I walked or biked to school from kindergarten through high school, as did most of my friends. The grade school was more than a mile away and the high school more than two miles. We didn't think anything of it. A popular evening past time might be to stroll around the neighborhood and converse with people on their front porches instead of hopping in a car to go workout at the gym. Etc. etc. But, I still think the obesity epidemic comes down mainly to our horrible diets full of excess sugar and carbohydrates, and in vast quantities. Why did everything grow so huge? I remember the first McDonald's burgers (15 cents each) that were little things on a thin bun with no extra glop. French fries were a little packet that people would sneer at today.
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Old 08-04-2020, 01:49 PM
 
5,729 posts, read 4,978,806 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by villageidiot1 View Post
I think you have a few exaggerations in your post. There was never a time when everyone smoked. According to these graphs, male smoking in the U.S. never exceeded 55% and female smoking never exceeded 35%.

When you state that, "It's true that people walked more, rode bikes...," this was only true for young people. It was rare to see an adult before around 1975, walking or riding a bike. I can count a only a few examples of adults who walked somewhere when I was growing up in the 1960s. The idea of doing anything for exercise was just not something that the pre-Boomer generations did.

I agree that kids walked and rode bikes a lot more in those days, but not adults. I walked to school and back all through elementary school, and walked home and back for lunch. Not many kids do that today.

It is true that many people born post-1955 have exercised much more than previous generations, and have been more health conscious. At the same time many more or these people are obese and suffer from diabetes than previous generations.
I agree with some of your points and disagree with others.

Adults exercising -- depends what part of the country you're talking about. When I first got to New England in 1983, there were all these old timers who'd walk everywhere, even in the snow. People in their 70s-80s and even 90s insisted on taking their "daily constitutional" in all sorts of weather. Tough old birds, that generation. And thin. And sharp as a tack.

New Yorkers traditionally do a lot of walking. Don't know about recently, but I visited a lot as a kid, to see my mom's relatives in Brooklyn where she grew up. People routinely walk multiple city blocks (90 yards to hundreds of yards) to get to the subway, to the store, to the park etc. You see people walking vigorously and purposely at all times of day and night. They walk fast, talk fast, and think fast.

About smoking... well I grew up in a smoking family; my dad, mom, sister, and brother all smoked at one time or other. Mom quit on doctor's orders, because of heart palpitations. Dad managed to quit after 50 years when he had an operation and was forced not to smoke for a couple of weeks. Brother switched to chewing tobacco for a few years then quit totally; sister smoked in college and a few years thereafter then somehow managed to quit.

in the 50s-60s-70s, my dad and every one of his colleagues at the hospital smoked. Every single one of them, as I recall. Doctors all smoked in the old days; they picked it up during med school as a way to relieve tension, then never could quit.

In the old Tammany Hall era of power politics in New York City, it was the classic "smoke filled room" of men smoking cigars and cigarettes as they wheeled and dealed. Most businessmen smoked.

I don't know about that CDC study. 55% sounds really low compared to cultural and historical accounts I've read. Maybe it was just certain urban settings where most guys smoked. Or else CDC under-sampled the population and extrapolated incorrectly, or ignored millions of more casual smokers. I think at one time it was 75% of men smoked, and quite a lot of women as well. It was the popular, cool thing to do.

One thing about smokers -- they're thin, and alert. I think there's actually a metabolic side effect of tobacco smoking that causes this. I don't advocate it -- have always avoided smoking though I actually don't mind the smoke -- but there's something there.

Better to be fat and stupid, than thin and alert and coughing?
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Old 08-04-2020, 01:54 PM
 
5,729 posts, read 4,978,806 times
Reputation: 14662
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zephyr2 View Post
I think people in the past didn't "work out" deliberately, but instead their lives included lots of routine exercise that many have lost track of. For example, when I was growing up in the 1960s most of the middle class homes in our neighborhood had one car, which the dad might have taken to work each day. Subsequently, the moms all walked more than a mile to the Grand Union supermarket with little carts. Kids would be enlisted to carry a bag if a large load was expected. I walked or biked to school from kindergarten through high school, as did most of my friends. The grade school was more than a mile away and the high school more than two miles. We didn't think anything of it. A popular evening past time might be to stroll around the neighborhood and converse with people on their front porches instead of hopping in a car to go workout at the gym. Etc. etc. But, I still think the obesity epidemic comes down mainly to our horrible diets full of excess sugar and carbohydrates, and in vast quantities. Why did everything grow so huge? I remember the first McDonald's burgers (15 cents each) that were little things on a thin bun with no extra glop. French fries were a little packet that people would sneer at today.
some public health people say it's high fructose corn syrup that made us all fat. It's an unnaturally concentrated form of fructose that metabolizes faster than table sugar (table sugar is sucrose which is a fructose and a glucose bound together, and the body has to cut them apart before it can convert them to pure glucose for energy).
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Old 08-04-2020, 04:17 PM
 
15,617 posts, read 10,667,362 times
Reputation: 29394
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluedevilz View Post
IMHO the answer is Dunkin Donuts Coffee. Every boomer I know that drinks Dunkin Donuts coffee is suffering from memory loss and other cognitive issues.

See how easy it is to make up a correlation and cause with no basis in reality?



I thought it was pizza
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