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Old 05-06-2023, 02:33 PM
 
Location: The Bubble, Florida
3,264 posts, read 2,227,352 times
Reputation: 9663

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And none of your post has anything to do with the current RSV vaccine. Everyone being vaccinated during the study, is being informed, in advance, that they're in a study. There is no implied consent. It is informed consent, and we have to sign a LOT of pages, initial a LOT of lines, to verify that we are informed about every step of the process that actually involves us.

We're not told if we are getting the vaccine or the placebo. But we ARE told that it's a double blind study, and our not knowing which we're getting is intentional.

We're not being told much from the manufacturer. We're being told plenty from the research company, which is NOT the manufacturer. GSK has partnered with third party research to ensure that their product meets stringent guidelines of safety and efficacy.

I don't have a medical background. I do, however, have a literate background, and a critical thinking background. I know not only how to read what's right in front of me in print, I also know how to notice that something that should be there, is missing. I know how to ask questions when I notice these things. I even know how to ask when I /don't/ notice something off or missing.

I also know how to learn new things, by making use of my skills in literacy and critical thinking. Your medical science background is impressive. But it doesn't make you an expert in the RSV vaccine. I'll put my trust in the experts before I put it in some random guy on the internet.
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Old 12-03-2023, 09:09 AM
 
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So how's the rollout going? Anyone here get the vaccine yet? I haven't heard of any major problems yet.

I think I'm going to wait until next year to get it. I'm hoping I still have enough lingering immunity from last year's infection that it will be milder if I get it.And since I'm around numerous kids or adolescents every day, I probably will.
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Old 12-03-2023, 10:30 AM
 
Location: The Bubble, Florida
3,264 posts, read 2,227,352 times
Reputation: 9663
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deserterer View Post
So how's the rollout going? Anyone here get the vaccine yet? I haven't heard of any major problems yet.

I think I'm going to wait until next year to get it. I'm hoping I still have enough lingering immunity from last year's infection that it will be milder if I get it.And since I'm around numerous kids or adolescents every day, I probably will.
If you're not a senior or an infant, you'll want to ask your doctor if you need to get the vaccine at all. I know you're not an infant but - you might be a senior RSV doesn't really have much affect on school-age children. For them it'd probably show up as just garden variety winter cold with the expected symptoms.

If you're a senior, from what I understand, you should not get the RSV /and/ any other shot (Flu or Covid) in the same visit. Flu and Covid can be taken together, but neither should be taken with RSV. Best to get one set, then wait a week, and get the other set. Whichever you feel you're at the worst risk for get first.
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Old 12-03-2023, 10:46 AM
 
5,588 posts, read 4,137,745 times
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Originally Posted by Ghaati View Post
If you're not a senior or an infant, you'll want to ask your doctor if you need to get the vaccine at all. I know you're not an infant but - you might be a senior RSV doesn't really have much affect on school-age children. For them it'd probably show up as just garden variety winter cold with the expected symptoms.

If you're a senior, from what I understand, you should not get the RSV /and/ any other shot (Flu or Covid) in the same visit. Flu and Covid can be taken together, but neither should be taken with RSV. Best to get one set, then wait a week, and get the other set. Whichever you feel you're at the worst risk for get first.

Like I said I don't plan to get the vax this year. I'm sure my doctor would recommend it because of how nasty my case was last year, so I will make sure not to ask him. He has to cover his butt, I only have to cover mine. Since I will almost certainly be exposed to it soon (if I haven't already) I will find out if my gamble was worth it. I'm really not worried about it, if I do get it its likely to be milder this time. Immunity begins to decline after 3 to 12 months and its only been 12 months. I fully intend to get the vax next year.
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Old 12-03-2023, 07:53 PM
 
Location: The Bubble, Florida
3,264 posts, read 2,227,352 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deserterer View Post
Like I said I don't plan to get the vax this year. I'm sure my doctor would recommend it because of how nasty my case was last year, so I will make sure not to ask him. He has to cover his butt, I only have to cover mine. Since I will almost certainly be exposed to it soon (if I haven't already) I will find out if my gamble was worth it. I'm really not worried about it, if I do get it its likely to be milder this time. Immunity begins to decline after 3 to 12 months and its only been 12 months. I fully intend to get the vax next year.
That is untrue about RSV. If you've had RSV, your immunity will last between 2 and 8 months. After that, you're no longer immune. Since RSV is a seasonal illness that occurs during the same 5-month period every year, you are absolutely at risk just as much as you were when you got sick the first time around.

Symptoms vary from year to year, and even at different points of the same season, among different people. But if last year's illness caused any actual -damage- to your lungs, AND if you get it again this year, you could end up in the hospital.

If you had no damage, then sure the same symptoms you got last time, might be milder this time. But any symptoms you didn't have last time - could show up this time - in addition to the milder other symptoms. RSV is a strange beast.

If I was "at risk" then I would absolutely not even think twice. I'd just get the vaccine. It doesn't prevent you from contracting the illness. What it does, is reduces the severity of the symptoms up to 87%.
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Old 12-03-2023, 08:05 PM
 
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I'm 62. I received three shots in mid October, all at the same time. The updated COVID vaccine from Moderna and the most recent flu vaccine in the left shoulder (where the COVID vaccines have always gone). After that, the new RSV vaccine in the right shoulder, which hurt so much that I turned, glared at the pharmacist, and loudly said "OUCH"! He laughed, saying that the RSV needle was larger and everyone had the same reaction.

I did just now read above about the warning against getting the RSV with any other...but I'm still alive.
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Old 12-03-2023, 08:12 PM
 
Location: The Bubble, Florida
3,264 posts, read 2,227,352 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by djmilf View Post
I'm 62. I received three shots in mid October, all at the same time. The updated COVID vaccine from Moderna and the most recent flu vaccine in the left shoulder (where the COVID vaccines have always gone). After that, the new RSV vaccine in the right shoulder, which hurt so much that I turned, glared at the pharmacist, and loudly said "OUCH"! He laughed, saying that the RSV needle was larger and everyone had the same reaction.

I did just now read above about the warning against getting the RSV with any other...but I'm still alive.
The problem with getting the RSV shot with the flu shot (in particular) is outlined here on the CDC website:
Quote:
Administration of RSV vaccine on the same day with other adult vaccines is acceptable. However, according to results of coadministration studies of RSV vaccines with influenza vaccines, common side effects, such as fever and soreness at the injection site, may be increased when these two vaccines are administered on the same day. Some studies also suggest it’s possible that the RSV and flu vaccines may not produce as strong of an immune response if they’re given on the same day, but the clinical significance of this is unknown. Additional research is ongoing to further inform guidance on same-day administration of the RSV vaccine and other adult vaccines, including the COVID-19 vaccine.
So - you might feel more sore than if you only got one or the other, AND the immunity each vaccine gives you, /might/ be reduced if you get both at the same time but the jury's still out on that.
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Old 12-03-2023, 10:03 PM
 
5,588 posts, read 4,137,745 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghaati View Post
That is untrue about RSV. If you've had RSV, your immunity will last between 2 and 8 months. After that, you're no longer immune. Since RSV is a seasonal illness that occurs during the same 5-month period every year, you are absolutely at risk just as much as you were when you got sick the first time around.

Symptoms vary from year to year, and even at different points of the same season, among different people. But if last year's illness caused any actual -damage- to your lungs, AND if you get it again this year, you could end up in the hospital.

If you had no damage, then sure the same symptoms you got last time, might be milder this time. But any symptoms you didn't have last time - could show up this time - in addition to the milder other symptoms. RSV is a strange beast.

If I was "at risk" then I would absolutely not even think twice. I'd just get the vaccine. It doesn't prevent you from contracting the illness. What it does, is reduces the severity of the symptoms up to 87%.
There are differing numbers out there, I didn't try to track down original sources but you can if you want.
https://www.healthline.com/health/ca...een-infections



I'm comfortable with my decision going with a longer estimate of durability and my guess that my symptoms will be less severe. I am not in a high risk group so it was quite surprising that it was as bad as it was last year, but I was under a lot of stress. I rarely get even moderately severe respiratory infections.
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Old 12-03-2023, 10:53 PM
 
2,954 posts, read 1,166,709 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghaati View Post

If I was "at risk" then I would absolutely not even think twice. I'd just get the vaccine. It doesn't prevent you from contracting the illness. What it does, is reduces the severity of the symptoms up to 87%.
Please go to table s7, page 21. https://www.nejm.org/doi/suppl/10.10...6_appendix.pdf

The RSV vaccine group had 396 serious adverse events, the placebo group had 387. The difference is not statistically significant but in general you want the vaccine group to have less, not more. Remember, a severe case of RSV infection would be counted in the serious adverse events (any event that gets you into a hospital qualifies).

What the study looked at was reduction of RSV infection with 2 or more symptoms, or 3 or more symptoms. For 3 or more symptoms, the reduction was 88%, for 2 or more symptoms (which obviously includes everyone with 3 or more symptoms), it was 66%.

While that sounds good, remember symptoms include cough, sore throat, nasal discharge. So none of these people had severe cases of RSV. In fact, they didn't even calculate the reduction in severe RSV (requiring hospitalization) because they didn't incur enough events to run the statistics. This should tell you something about the rate of severe disease in people >= 60 from RSV.

Keep in mind, prior infection from RSV will produce immune memory and keep subsequent infections milder. This is why infants tend to have the worst cases of RSV. Of course, the extreme elderly have depleted immune systems, so eventually any bug that they catch can be a problem.

RSV incubation period is between 2-8 days (long range indicating scientists are unsure). This will make it hard for vaccine or prior immunity to prevent infection as adaptive immunity takes around 5 days to fire (so if incubation period is less than 5 days, it won't block infection).

With all that being said, everyone can take that information into consideration when deciding for or against RSV infection. I would only recommend people with severely depleted immune systems and/or those in nursing homes to take the shot.

Last edited by WaikikiWaves; 12-03-2023 at 11:19 PM..
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Old 12-04-2023, 06:38 AM
 
8,347 posts, read 7,286,742 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghaati View Post
The problem with getting the RSV shot with the flu shot (in particular) is outlined here on the CDC website:
I didn't get any fever, and the soreness from the RSV shot was immediate. I have my doubts that a flu vaccine given mere seconds before the RSV vaccine was administered had such an immediate effect.

Quote:
So - you might feel more sore than if you only got one or the other, AND the immunity each vaccine gives you, /might/ be reduced if you get both at the same time but the jury's still out on that.
Guess I'll just have to find out if the above is true for me. If I get through the second week of January without contracting either the flu or RSV, I'm probably in the clear.
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