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Old 02-22-2007, 11:49 AM
 
358 posts, read 1,385,743 times
Reputation: 163
Question Best cities for disabled residents? (and seniors)

I'm wondering about what cities might be best for (younger) active disabled residents. (in my case I'm early 20s)

Some possible characteristics that I'm thinking of:
Affordable housing (subsidized - public housing/section 8/etc)
No need for a car -- access to public transportation, or ease of cycling/walking
A nice social scene -- things to do, places to go, people to see (without needing a huge bank account)
A high general quality of life of the city -- relatively low crime, low poverty, good education, etc
Decent climate -- comfortable to spend much time outdoors for most of the year (for example not Tuscon (AZ) or Duluth (MN) )

Anyone have any opinions or comments? I'd love to hear. Thanks
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Old 02-22-2007, 03:29 PM
 
Location: Monterey Bay, California -- watching the sea lions, whales and otters! :D
1,905 posts, read 4,470,471 times
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I've had a few friends with disabilities, and I've heard that two of the best cities are Boulder, Colorado, and Santa Cruz, California -- unfortunately, expensive for most, however, the services for disabled people are great.

I think Seattle may be pretty good, too, although I'm not sure about the specifics. I have two friends who have brain damage -- one from cancer, and the other from a horse riding accident -- and one lives in Boulder, the other in Santa Cruz -- and they say they are great towns for people with disabilities. Good luck to you!
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Old 02-22-2007, 04:23 PM
 
Location: Missouri
5,814 posts, read 14,332,941 times
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The places with the most programs for disabled people (like subsidized housing) will be the places known for high taxes. New Jersey has quite a few programs for the disabled; I am told New York has even more. I don't know much about California but being it is a high-income, high-tax state, I believe the previous poster when she says there are many programs for the disabled. I know Florida does not have many good programs.
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Old 02-19-2009, 08:42 AM
 
2 posts, read 17,823 times
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What about programs for the adult disabled in Penn.? I have good things about this state.
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Old 11-06-2009, 04:17 PM
 
Location: Chattanooga, TN
4 posts, read 22,683 times
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According to the National Organization on Disability: Houston, TX was ranked the #1 most accessible city for the disabled in 2008 and Indianapolis, IN was ranked the #1 most disability friendly city in 2009. For clarification of the two, "accessibility" is based on physical access to buildings and services, and "disability friendly" is based on people's attitudes.
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Old 01-17-2010, 08:18 PM
 
Location: Rochester, NY
7 posts, read 37,786 times
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hi, I am wondering which state/city is best for most significant disabilities like me as well as complex chairs?
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Old 01-18-2010, 08:24 AM
 
Location: Greenwood Village, Colorado
2,185 posts, read 1,553,542 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deafquad86 View Post
hi, I am wondering which state/city is best for most significant disabilities like me as well as complex chairs?



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RM0GjqwrwHs

This guy made a bunch of videos of what it's like to live in NY in a wheelchair. He has over a dozen.
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Old 01-19-2010, 04:11 PM
 
Location: Rochester, NY
7 posts, read 37,786 times
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nyc is too expensive
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Old 09-01-2011, 03:53 PM
 
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Default The right place

I am disabled and I live in Fountain Inn, SC I have no need for a car, the complex I live in they do a criminal background check before a person can lease here, being a small town there is very little crime here, I listen to my police scanner so I know. It only snows 2 days a year on average. It is 12 miles from Greenville, SC and 85 miles from Columbia, SC, 4 hours drive to Myrtle Beach. There is a grocery store across the street, a hospital, doctors offices, library, police, fire and EMS, 6 restaurants all of these are within walking distance. This is the bible belt so there is a lot of great resources to help the disabled and others on low income, I created a website of them Home Page Resources at no cost help disabled medicare medicaid seniors uninsured the complex is called Valley View Apartments and the main office phone number is 336-544-2300 Harris Brown Management. The cost of living is low here too and there are 3 major highways close by. There are 2 local churches within walking distance that give out free groceries to those on low income and a few soup kitchens about 10 miles away into the next town. Good luck to you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Milliano View Post
I'm wondering about what cities might be best for (younger) active disabled residents. (in my case I'm early 20s)

Some possible characteristics that I'm thinking of:
Affordable housing (subsidized - public housing/section 8/etc)
No need for a car -- access to public transportation, or ease of cycling/walking
A nice social scene -- things to do, places to go, people to see (without needing a huge bank account)
A high general quality of life of the city -- relatively low crime, low poverty, good education, etc
Decent climate -- comfortable to spend much time outdoors for most of the year (for example not Tuscon (AZ) or Duluth (MN) )

Anyone have any opinions or comments? I'd love to hear. Thanks
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Old 09-03-2011, 01:41 PM
 
18,869 posts, read 14,513,470 times
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Interestingly enough, the best places for housing, transportation, community, are places where the disabled population is very small, think..Wyoming, SD, ND, Montana, because they have services, and block grants by the government, which is dispersed, so, there is more availability in places where there are less people for the same resources.
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