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View Poll Results: do you know your blood type?
YES 124 81.05%
NO 29 18.95%
Voters: 153. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-05-2009, 09:46 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,165 posts, read 57,302,589 times
Reputation: 52030

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No idea ...
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Old 02-05-2009, 10:00 AM
 
2,838 posts, read 8,844,735 times
Reputation: 2857
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluedevilz View Post
I find this story more than a little hard to believe...

Any first year medical student is intimately aware of ABO groupings and Rh factor.

An OB in particular, due to hemolytic disease of the newborn, has to have a firm grasp of the concept.

I don't buy that you had to "teach" basic genetics to your OB, and if you did that OB should not be practicing.
You don't have to believe it. I was there. Maybe she should not be practicing. Maybe she "heard" that the RH factor was not in fact a recessive gene. I've been told all sorts of wacky things by doctors... though this was definitely one of the wackiest!
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Old 02-05-2009, 10:23 AM
 
5,905 posts, read 5,081,089 times
Reputation: 4534
I'm O Neg but unable to donate, as I contracted Hep A 20 yrs ago. No one can tell me why it excludes me, since Hep A--unlike Hep B or C--is short-lived, not chronic, and cannot be passed to another person once the illness is over. Conversely, my son--who was 2 yrs old at the time (we contracted it from his daycare)--IS able to donate both blood and organs, since he was so young. I just don't get it.
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Old 02-05-2009, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Where we enjoy all four seasons
20,799 posts, read 8,532,428 times
Reputation: 15883
I am A RH Negative and yes I have heard of Rho-gam because I have received it three times.

I cannot give blood anymore as they will not take it if you have high blood pressure.
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Old 02-05-2009, 11:49 AM
 
190 posts, read 605,701 times
Reputation: 139
I'm A- the product of 0+ and A+ parents. When we studied dominant and recessive genes in school the book said there was a 1 in 4 possibility with a recessive negative that a child would be negative. That seems true in my case since my three siblings are all positives.
My kid's are A+ and 0+ so no one in the family can donate for me.
I also have the Antibody to Cytomegalovirus which means my blood is particularly good for those with compromised immune systems and preemies.
I donate regularly and get my free cookies
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Old 02-05-2009, 11:55 AM
 
4,625 posts, read 10,500,588 times
Reputation: 10314
Quote:
Originally Posted by beanandpumpkin View Post
You don't have to believe it. I was there. Maybe she should not be practicing. Maybe she "heard" that the RH factor was not in fact a recessive gene. I've been told all sorts of wacky things by doctors... though this was definitely one of the wackiest!
If she was an MD/DO than I guarantee she had more training in genetics than you have, she didn't just "hear" something.

Also Rh "factor" is NOT a recessive gene.

Rh is dominant-recessive, ie: Rh positive gene is dominant, rh negative gene is recessive.

Its actually a little more complicated than that since Rh is determined by 3 genes, C D and E, and when anyone of those is the dominant form the Rh positive factor will be expressed.

I still don't buy the story. An OB that doesn't understand Rh genetics backwards and forwards would be a walking lawsuit with the specter of hemolytic disease of the newborn and not knowing when to use Rhogam...
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Old 02-05-2009, 11:57 AM
 
3,825 posts, read 6,180,631 times
Reputation: 3868
Everyone should know their blood type and if you don't know it find out.

I also suggest that everyone make up a small card for their wallet or purse with medical information, blood type, medications, allergies, and medial conditions. This is information an emergency responder needs to know if you are found unconscious or uncoherent. It just might save your life.

Don
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Old 02-05-2009, 12:05 PM
 
4,625 posts, read 10,500,588 times
Reputation: 10314
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alter View Post
I'm A- the product of 0+ and A+ parents. When we studied dominant and recessive genes in school the book said there was a 1 in 4 possibility with a recessive negative that a child would be negative. That seems true in my case since my three siblings are all positives.
My kid's are A+ and 0+ so no one in the family can donate for me.
I also have the Antibody to Cytomegalovirus which means my blood is particularly good for those with compromised immune systems and preemies.
I donate regularly and get my free cookies
Are you sure you weren't told that you DON"T have the antibody to CMV??

Because that is the blood that is used for immunocompromised patients and preemies....blood that is clear of the antibody.

If you have the antibody (which by some estimates is carried by more than half the population) that means you have been exposed to the virus which can be potentially devastating to immunocompromised hosts.

Its actually CMV antibody FREE blood that is more valuable in these circumstances.
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Old 02-05-2009, 12:10 PM
 
Location: Long Island
444 posts, read 922,983 times
Reputation: 172
I am o+. I only found out this year because I donated blood.
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Old 02-05-2009, 12:20 PM
 
2,838 posts, read 8,844,735 times
Reputation: 2857
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluedevilz View Post
If she was an MD/DO than I guarantee she had more training in genetics than you have, she didn't just "hear" something.

Also Rh "factor" is NOT a recessive gene.

Rh is dominant-recessive, ie: Rh positive gene is dominant, rh negative gene is recessive.

Its actually a little more complicated than that since Rh is determined by 3 genes, C D and E, and when anyone of those is the dominant form the Rh positive factor will be expressed.

I still don't buy the story. An OB that doesn't understand Rh genetics backwards and forwards would be a walking lawsuit with the specter of hemolytic disease of the newborn and not knowing when to use Rhogam...
Why are you so offended by this?

I am not making this up... this just goes to show that doctors don't know everything. Your absolute disbelief that a doctor could make a mistake is a bit odd, but whatever floats your boat.... *shrug*
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