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Old 07-17-2007, 11:02 PM
 
Location: California
70,229 posts, read 17,339,973 times
Reputation: 41149

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I've had this buzzling sound in the left ear all the time.If I am tired the sound gets louder. The doctor says it's old age,nothing I can do about it.I am only 50 something,Does anyone had that problem and was cured? Right now it is loud because it's the end of the day.
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Old 07-17-2007, 11:09 PM
 
Location: Tucson, AZ
3,774 posts, read 9,078,354 times
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We are in the same club dragonten. I notice it at nightin bed when I'm trying to go to sleep, more than any other time (because the room is quiet). I notice it a bit right now too.

I've been to an ear doctor, and they can't find anything wrong with my ears. Next visit they are going to give me a hearing test to see if all is in order. I don't have problems hearing, so it'll be interesting to see what happens. If anyone has a magic cure for this annoyance, please share!
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Old 07-18-2007, 08:52 AM
 
Location: California
70,229 posts, read 17,339,973 times
Reputation: 41149
Quote:
Originally Posted by recycled View Post
We are in the same club dragonten. I notice it at nightin bed when I'm trying to go to sleep, more than any other time (because the room is quiet). I notice it a bit right now too.

I've been to an ear doctor, and they can't find anything wrong with my ears. Next visit they are going to give me a hearing test to see if all is in order. I don't have problems hearing, so it'll be interesting to see what happens. If anyone has a magic cure for this annoyance, please share!
I hope someone would know what to do about this,it will really help our lives to live a little better.
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Old 07-18-2007, 09:30 AM
 
Location: I'm not lost, I'm exploring!
3,402 posts, read 12,858,871 times
Reputation: 5762
Default tada!

Tinnitus, or ringing in the ears, is the sensation of hearing ringing, buzzing, hissing, chirping, whistling, or other sounds. Some people hear more complex sounds that vary over time. The sounds may be intermittent, continuous, or pulsating in time with the heart beat. A pulsating sound may result from a blocked artery, an aneurysm, a tumor in a blood vessel, or other blood vessel disorders.

The noise can vary in loudness. It is often worse when background noise is low, so you may be most aware of it at night when you're trying to fall asleep in a quiet room.

Although tinnitus is often associated with hearing loss, it does not cause the loss; nor does a hearing loss cause tinnitus. In fact, some people with tinnitus experience no difficulty hearing, and in a few cases they even become so acutely sensitive to sound that they must take steps to muffle or mask external noises.

Tinnitus is usually caused by a head injury, an infection, a disease or exposure to loud sounds such as gunshots and explosions.

It can be a sign of hearing loss, or it can result from head injuries, or diseases that range from the common cold to diabetes. People who work with noisy equipment, such as power tools, can also get it. Or tinnitus may be initiated by a single loud noise, such as a gunshot or an explosion. It can also be a symptom of almost any ear disorder, including the following:

Ear infections
Blocked ear canal
Blocked eustachian tube
Otosolerosis
Tumors of the middle ear
Meniere's disease
Damage to the ear caused by drugs (such as aspirin and some antibiotics)
Hearing loss
Blast injury from a blast or explosion

Tinnitus may also occur with other disorders such as anemia, heart and blood vessel disorders including hypertension and arteriosclerosis, and low thyroid hormone levels in the blood (hypothyroidism).

A wide variety of conditions and illnesses can lead to tinnitus. Blockages of the ear due to a buildup of wax, an infection (Otitis Media), or rarely, a tumor of the auditory nerve can cause the unwanted sounds. A perforated eardrum also could be the culprit. The most common source of chronic tinnitus is prolonged exposure to loud sounds from sources such as blaring radios, gunshots, jackhammers, industrial machinery, rock concerts, etc. The noise causes permanent damage to the sound-sensitive cells of the cochlea, a spiral- shaped organ in the inner ear. A single exposure to a sudden extremely loud noise can also cause tinnitus.

In sensitive people, the mercury in common amalgam dental fillings can lead to tinnitus. The ringing could also be a signal that the body is overwhelmed with stress and work.

Temporary tinnitus can also results from loose ear hair or a fragment from a recent haircut. They get deposited close to the ear drum, vibrate and create thunderous notes.

Sinus congestion, antibiotics, aspirin, barbiturates, quinine containing medications, exposure to chemicals such as carbon monoxide from gasoline fumes or the benzene used by dry cleaners, or by excessive consumption of aspirin, alcohol, or caffeine can also results in tinnitus. In fact, tinnitus is cited as a potential side effect for about 200 prescription and nonprescription drugs. In these cases, the tinnitus usually disappears when the underlying triggers are controlled, limited, or avoided.

Exercise can cause tinnitus by disrupting the auditory system's normal function. According to the New England Journal of Medicine (February 1991), ringing in the ears may result from the jarring force of high-impact exercises.

The natural process of aging can result in a deterioration of the cochlea or other parts of the ear and lead to tinnitus. Tinnitus is also associated with Meniere's disease, a disorder of the inner ear, and otosclerosis, a degenerative disease of the small bones in the middle ear. Tinnitus can also be a symptom of a disorder of the neck or jaw, such as temporomandibular joint syndrome (TMJ).

For reasons not yet entirely clear to researchers, stress seems to worsen tinnitus.



Avoid alcohol, smoking, and caffeine; they can make tinnitus worse.

Cut down on salt in your diet. Salt can cause fluid to build up in your ears, worsening tinnitus.

Tone down sound around you. Avoid loud noises, which can aggravate a case of tinnitus you already have. Wear earplugs whenever noise abounds. You can use foam, rubber or moldable wax plugs. You can also use headphones you wear like earmuffs.

Some people don't notice their tinnitus in the daytime, but as soon as the lights go out, they're up to their inner ears in bells and buzzers. In this case turn on an FM radio; tune it so that it will point to the static between stations. If you keep the radio near the bed just loud enough to be audible, the static near your head will mask the sounds in your head and let you fall asleep. You can also use music to soothe you to sleep. Or record a 'white noise' tape, such as of running water, and play it whenever you need relief.

Some people can't hear their tinnitus when they take showers. You can carry shower sounds around with you. How? Make a long-playing tape of a running shower. When the tinnitus gets bad, listen to the tape through headphones.

Stress was found to make tinnitus worse. So, relaxation and stress management techniques also are useful. Deep, slow breathing is one safe way to ease tension. However, this may not be enough. See a counselor if you're having difficulty dealing with stress in your life and your tinnitus is becoming worse because of it.

Avoid too much aspirin. If you take aspirin daily (for arthritis, for example), try a different anti-inflammatory drug if you are suffering from tinnitus. Aspirin can cause or worsen tinnitus. Some of the other anti-inflammatory drugs can also cause or worsen tinnitus, but not in everyone.

Distraction is an effective technique to combat tinnitus. Focus on some outside activities: Help other people. Join some volunteer groups. Enrich rather than restrict your life.

Increase circulation to the ear area by massaging or applying a hot compress on the neck before going to bed. Dip a small towel into hot water, wring out, place on neck and place a dry towel over it.

Stimulate overall circulation with alternating hot and cold foot baths every evening.

Place a small cotton pouch filled with 3 tbsp. each of hot roasted millet seeds and salt on one ear. Leave on for ten minutes.

Regularly chew dried fruit. It increases circulation to the ear area.

An occlusal splint can help stop teeth grinding, which is known to cause tinnitus.
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Old 07-18-2007, 09:51 AM
 
11,460 posts, read 49,120,322 times
Reputation: 15824
In addition to avoidance of caffeine, alcohol, and salt ...

add garlic capsules to your daily intake. It's helped my tinnitus noticeably to the point where some days, I hardly even hear it until I forget to take the garlic again.
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Old 07-18-2007, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Reston, VA
948 posts, read 4,233,670 times
Reputation: 549
Quote:
Originally Posted by fiddlekitten View Post
Tinnitus, or ringing in the ears, is the sensation of hearing ringing, buzzing, hissing, chirping, whistling, or other sounds. Some people hear more complex sounds that vary over time. The sounds may be intermittent, continuous, or pulsating in time with the heart beat. A pulsating sound may result from a blocked artery, an aneurysm, a tumor in a blood vessel, or other blood vessel disorders.

The noise can vary in loudness. It is often worse when background noise is low, so you may be most aware of it at night when you're trying to fall asleep in a quiet room.

Although tinnitus is often associated with hearing loss, it does not cause the loss; nor does a hearing loss cause tinnitus. In fact, some people with tinnitus experience no difficulty hearing, and in a few cases they even become so acutely sensitive to sound that they must take steps to muffle or mask external noises.

Tinnitus is usually caused by a head injury, an infection, a disease or exposure to loud sounds such as gunshots and explosions.

It can be a sign of hearing loss, or it can result from head injuries, or diseases that range from the common cold to diabetes. People who work with noisy equipment, such as power tools, can also get it. Or tinnitus may be initiated by a single loud noise, such as a gunshot or an explosion. It can also be a symptom of almost any ear disorder, including the following:

Ear infections
Blocked ear canal
Blocked eustachian tube
Otosolerosis
Tumors of the middle ear
Meniere's disease
Damage to the ear caused by drugs (such as aspirin and some antibiotics)
Hearing loss
Blast injury from a blast or explosion

Tinnitus may also occur with other disorders such as anemia, heart and blood vessel disorders including hypertension and arteriosclerosis, and low thyroid hormone levels in the blood (hypothyroidism).

A wide variety of conditions and illnesses can lead to tinnitus. Blockages of the ear due to a buildup of wax, an infection (Otitis Media), or rarely, a tumor of the auditory nerve can cause the unwanted sounds. A perforated eardrum also could be the culprit. The most common source of chronic tinnitus is prolonged exposure to loud sounds from sources such as blaring radios, gunshots, jackhammers, industrial machinery, rock concerts, etc. The noise causes permanent damage to the sound-sensitive cells of the cochlea, a spiral- shaped organ in the inner ear. A single exposure to a sudden extremely loud noise can also cause tinnitus.

In sensitive people, the mercury in common amalgam dental fillings can lead to tinnitus. The ringing could also be a signal that the body is overwhelmed with stress and work.

Temporary tinnitus can also results from loose ear hair or a fragment from a recent haircut. They get deposited close to the ear drum, vibrate and create thunderous notes.

Sinus congestion, antibiotics, aspirin, barbiturates, quinine containing medications, exposure to chemicals such as carbon monoxide from gasoline fumes or the benzene used by dry cleaners, or by excessive consumption of aspirin, alcohol, or caffeine can also results in tinnitus. In fact, tinnitus is cited as a potential side effect for about 200 prescription and nonprescription drugs. In these cases, the tinnitus usually disappears when the underlying triggers are controlled, limited, or avoided.

Exercise can cause tinnitus by disrupting the auditory system's normal function. According to the New England Journal of Medicine (February 1991), ringing in the ears may result from the jarring force of high-impact exercises.

The natural process of aging can result in a deterioration of the cochlea or other parts of the ear and lead to tinnitus. Tinnitus is also associated with Meniere's disease, a disorder of the inner ear, and otosclerosis, a degenerative disease of the small bones in the middle ear. Tinnitus can also be a symptom of a disorder of the neck or jaw, such as temporomandibular joint syndrome (TMJ).

For reasons not yet entirely clear to researchers, stress seems to worsen tinnitus.



Avoid alcohol, smoking, and caffeine; they can make tinnitus worse.

Cut down on salt in your diet. Salt can cause fluid to build up in your ears, worsening tinnitus.

Tone down sound around you. Avoid loud noises, which can aggravate a case of tinnitus you already have. Wear earplugs whenever noise abounds. You can use foam, rubber or moldable wax plugs. You can also use headphones you wear like earmuffs.

Some people don't notice their tinnitus in the daytime, but as soon as the lights go out, they're up to their inner ears in bells and buzzers. In this case turn on an FM radio; tune it so that it will point to the static between stations. If you keep the radio near the bed just loud enough to be audible, the static near your head will mask the sounds in your head and let you fall asleep. You can also use music to soothe you to sleep. Or record a 'white noise' tape, such as of running water, and play it whenever you need relief.

Some people can't hear their tinnitus when they take showers. You can carry shower sounds around with you. How? Make a long-playing tape of a running shower. When the tinnitus gets bad, listen to the tape through headphones.

Stress was found to make tinnitus worse. So, relaxation and stress management techniques also are useful. Deep, slow breathing is one safe way to ease tension. However, this may not be enough. See a counselor if you're having difficulty dealing with stress in your life and your tinnitus is becoming worse because of it.

Avoid too much aspirin. If you take aspirin daily (for arthritis, for example), try a different anti-inflammatory drug if you are suffering from tinnitus. Aspirin can cause or worsen tinnitus. Some of the other anti-inflammatory drugs can also cause or worsen tinnitus, but not in everyone.

Distraction is an effective technique to combat tinnitus. Focus on some outside activities: Help other people. Join some volunteer groups. Enrich rather than restrict your life.

Increase circulation to the ear area by massaging or applying a hot compress on the neck before going to bed. Dip a small towel into hot water, wring out, place on neck and place a dry towel over it.

Stimulate overall circulation with alternating hot and cold foot baths every evening.

Place a small cotton pouch filled with 3 tbsp. each of hot roasted millet seeds and salt on one ear. Leave on for ten minutes.

Regularly chew dried fruit. It increases circulation to the ear area.

An occlusal splint can help stop teeth grinding, which is known to cause tinnitus.

Great post, thank you!
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Old 07-18-2007, 11:26 AM
 
Location: California
70,229 posts, read 17,339,973 times
Reputation: 41149
fiddlekitten: great post
There is so much reading,I would have to read all of it tonight,but I notice you said something about Sinus problems.I always blow my nose too hard,and my nose is alwasy blocked.So the next thing to do is to do something about my sinuses,but the damage is done to my ear now.What to do? I don't know.
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Old 07-18-2007, 01:15 PM
 
Location: Florida
6,262 posts, read 18,339,291 times
Reputation: 4731
Bless anyone's heart who suffers from this. I've had tinnitus for 25 years now. Nothing can be done according to every ENT,Audiologist,GP and any other doctor I've begged to help me. I did buy a sound machine I use at night and it helps greatly.
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Old 07-18-2007, 02:02 PM
 
Location: I'm not lost, I'm exploring!
3,402 posts, read 12,858,871 times
Reputation: 5762
Dragonten, coming from someone who suffers an 80% hearing loss, and overactive sinus, I can sympathize with you.

Have you ever tried having your adnoids removed? It is not harmful, they put you to sleep, and say by-by to nose problems. You may want to sleep with a humidifier for the first few nights while your passages get used to being THAT clear. I had mine taken at a young age, but I still remember the tremendous releif it was. ..they didn't care about my nose at the time. They were trying to fix my hearing
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Old 07-18-2007, 10:31 PM
 
Location: California
70,229 posts, read 17,339,973 times
Reputation: 41149
Thanks for all the information,you mentioned about stress,It does seem to add more sound. I do TM but when everything's so quiet,the sound gets louder.
Very interesting about the foot baths,I should try that
I should try massaging too.
Thanks!
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