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Old 04-27-2009, 11:14 AM
 
Location: Chicago, Illinois
3,020 posts, read 5,911,358 times
Reputation: 1311

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it must be a slow news day/week.
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Old 04-27-2009, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Some got six month some got one solid. But me and my buddies all got lifetime here
4,550 posts, read 6,680,140 times
Reputation: 2054
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarolinaCowboy View Post
So these threads got moved to the general health section. So when this bugger breaks out locally, we are not supposed to discuss it in the local forum?

There's a swine flu thread in the New Jersey forum. A mod has posted in it but nobody's moved it.
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Old 04-27-2009, 11:43 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
2,868 posts, read 6,199,129 times
Reputation: 1444
There are 2 antiviral medications that can treat this flu.
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Old 04-27-2009, 12:28 PM
 
Location: Manhattan, Ks
1,276 posts, read 3,650,600 times
Reputation: 1671
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hopes View Post
I can't understand why the family checklist includes stocking up on water and preparing for electrical outages. How is a pandemic going to change our supplies of water and electricity? I can understand needing to stock up on food since stores might close, but water and electricity does not make sense to me whatsoever

Perhaps those are there because manpower is needed to maintain those services. If there's a deadly disease outbreak, I know I'm not going to work. It's a good idea to be prepared for water and power company employees to stay home as well. At least that's my understanding.
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Old 04-27-2009, 12:58 PM
 
Location: Florida
6,270 posts, read 12,383,209 times
Reputation: 4544
Live your lives to the fullest-everyday!!
Your fate was decided the day you were born anyway.
Hysteria--who needs it?
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Old 04-27-2009, 01:26 PM
 
Location: Scranton
1,987 posts, read 2,086,940 times
Reputation: 1840
Quote:
Originally Posted by saturnfan View Post
Will we ever learn to shut the borders to third world countries? You'd not believe the TB coming here on illegal immigrants.

I agree with you, but they won't, they'll just let them all keep coming.
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Old 04-27-2009, 01:51 PM
 
Location: Cornelius
3,665 posts, read 6,435,830 times
Reputation: 772
CDC - Influenza (Flu) | Interim Guidance for Infection Control for Care of Patients with Confirmed or Suspected Swine Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infection in a Healthcare Setting

INTERIM RECOMMENDATIONS

For clinical care or collection of respiratory specimens from a symptomatic individual (acute respiratory symptoms with or without fever) who is a confirmed case, or a suspected case (ill close contact of a confirmed case) of swine influenza A (H1N1) virus infection:

Infectious Period

Persons with swine influenza A (H1N1) virus infection should be considered potentially contagious for up to 7 days following illness onset. Persons who continue to be ill longer than 7 days after illness onset should be considered potentially contagious until symptoms have resolved. Children, especially younger children, might potentially be contagious for longer periods. The duration of infectiousness might vary by swine influenza A (H1N1) virus strain.
Non-hospitalized ill persons who are a confirmed or suspected case of swine influenza A (H1N1) virus infection are recommended to stay at home (voluntary isolation) for at least the first 7 days after illness onset except to seek medical care.

Case definitions

A confirmed case of swine influenza A (H1N1) virus infection is defined as a person with an acute respiratory illness with laboratory confirmed swine influenza A (H1N1) virus infection at CDC by one or more of the following tests:

* real-time RT-PCR
* viral culture
* four-fold rise in swine influenza A (H1N1) virus-specific neutralizing antibodies

A suspected case of swine influenza A (H1N1) virus infection is defined as a person with acute febrile respiratory illness with onset within 7 days of close contact with a person who is a confirmed case of swine influenza A (H1N1) virus infection.

Close contact is defined as: within about 6 feet of an ill person who is a confirmed or suspected case of swine influenza A (H1N1) virus infection.

Acute respiratory illness is defined as recent onset of at least two of the following: rhinorrhea or nasal congestion, sore throat, cough (with or without fever or feverishness)

Clinicians should consider swine influenza A (H1N1) virus infection in the differential diagnosis of patients with febrile respiratory disease and who 1) live in San Diego and Imperial Counties, California, or Guadalupe County, Texas, or traveled to these counties or 2) who traveled recently to Mexico or were in contact with persons who had febrile respiratory illness and were in the two U.S. counties or Mexico in the 7 days preceding their illness onset.

Infection Control of Ill Persons in a Healthcare Setting

Patients with suspected or confirmed case-status should be placed in a single-patient room with the door kept closed. If available, an airborne infection isolation room (AIIR) with negative pressure air handling with 6 to 12 air changes per hour can be used. Air can be exhausted directly outside or be recirculated after filtration by a high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter. For suctioning, bronchoscopy, or intubation, use a procedure room with negative pressure air handling.

The ill person should wear a surgical mask when outside of the patient room, and should be encouraged to wash hands frequently and follow respiratory hygiene practices. Cups and other utensils used by the ill person should be washed with soap and water before use by other persons. Routine cleaning and disinfection strategies used during influenza seasons can be applied to the environmental management of swine influenza. More information can be found at Guideline for Environmental Infection Control in Healthcare Facilities, 2003 | CDC Infection Control in Healthcare.

Standard, Droplet and Contact precautions should be used for all patient care activities, and maintained for 7 days after illness onset or until symptoms have resolved. Maintain adherence to hand hygiene by washing with soap and water or using hand sanitizer immediately after removing gloves and other equipment and after any contact with respiratory secretions.

Personnel providing care to or collecting clinical specimens from suspected or confirmed cases should wear disposable non-sterile gloves, gowns, and eye protection (e.g., goggles) to prevent conjunctival exposure.

Masks and respirators: Until additional, specific information is available regarding the behavior of this swine influenza A (H1N1), the guidance in the October 2006 “Interim Guidance on Planning for the Use of Surgical Masks and Respirators in Healthcare Settings during an Influenza Pandemic” http://www.pandemicflu.gov/plan/healthcare/maskguidancehc.htmlExternal (broken link) Web Site Policy. should be used. These interim recommendations will be updated as additional information becomes available.

Interim recommendations:

* Personnel engaged in aerosol generating activities (e.g., collection of clinical specimens, endotracheal intubation, nebulizer treatment, bronchoscopy, and resuscitation involving emergency intubation or cardiac pulmonary resuscitation) for suspected or confirmed swine influenza A (H1N1) cases should wear a fit-tested disposable N95 respirator.*
* Pending clarification of transmission patterns for this virus, personnel providing direct patient care for suspected or confirmed swine influenza A (H1N1) cases should wear a fit-tested disposable N95 respirator when entering the patient room.

*Respirator use should be in the context of a complete respiratory protection program in accordance with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations. Information on respiratory protection programs and fit test procedures can be accessed at Respiratory Protection eTool. Staff should be medically cleared, fit-tested, and trained for respirator use, including: proper fit-testing and use of respirators, safe removal and disposal, and medical contraindications to respirator use.

Additional information on N95 respirators and other types of respirators may be found at: NIOSH/NPPTL - Respirator Fact Sheet - What You Should Know in Deciding Whether to Buy Escape Hoods, Gas Masks, or Other Respirators for Preparedness at Home and Work, and at www.fda.gov/cdrh/ppe/masksrespirators.htmlExternal (broken link) Web Site Policy..
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Old 04-27-2009, 01:52 PM
 
Location: Cornelius
3,665 posts, read 6,435,830 times
Reputation: 772
If you have masks in your preparedness kits, it is imperative to have the proper masks for your individual face, and how to use them. Otherwise you risk a false sense of protection. Please see official guidance below:

US FDA/CDRH: Personal Protective Equipment - Masks and N95 Respirators (http://www.fda.gov/cdrh/ppe/masksrespirators.html - broken link)

Masks and N95 Respirators

On this page:

* About surgical masks and surgical N95 respirators
* When to use surgical masks and surgical N95 respirators
* Types of masks and respirators used in patient care
* Choosing between surgical masks and surgical N95 respirators
* Non-medical respirators
* What you should know before using surgical masks and surgical N95 respirators
* Find all FDA-cleared surgical masks and surgical N95 respirators

About surgical masks and surgical N95 respirators

Surgical masks and surgical N95 respirators are disposable devices that cover the mouth and nose during medical procedures. They help protect the caregiver and patient against microorganisms, body fluids, and small particles in the air.

Surgical masks and surgical N95 respirators are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). FDA evaluates the performance of these devices in areas including fluid resistance and filtration efficiency to ensure that they are at least as safe and effective as similar devices already on the market. FDA encourages manufacturers to follow specific performance standards for their masks, and FDA also requires that these products be produced using good manufacturing practices.

Respirators may also be certified by NIOSH (the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) in accordance with regulations in 42 CFR part 84. When a mask is both cleared by FDA as a surgical mask and certified by NIOSH as an N95 respirator mask, FDA calls it a "surgical N95 respirator."

For more information, see FDA’s Role in Regulating PPE: Personal Protective Equipment - FDA's Role in Regulating PPE (http://www.fda.gov/cdrh/ppe/fdarole.html - broken link)


When to use surgical masks and surgical N95 respirators

Use surgical masks and surgical N95 respirators to cover your mouth and nose when you may be splattered by or exposed to someone else’s body fluids (such as blood, respiratory secretions, vomit, urine or feces).


Types of masks and respirators used in patient care

Surgical masks

* include masks labeled as surgical, laser, isolation, dental, or medical procedure masks
* help protect against microorganisms, body fluids, and large particles in the air
* are designed to cover the mouth and nose loosely; not sized for individual fit
* help prevent exposure to the wearer’s saliva and respiratory secretions
* are made of soft materials and are comfortable to wear
* are usually packaged in boxes of single-use masks

Surgical N95 respirators

* are surgical masks that are designed to protect against small droplets of respiratory fluids and other airborne particles in addition to all the protection of surgical masks
* fit closely to form a tight seal over the mouth and nose
* require fit-testing and must be adjusted to your face to provide intended effectiveness
* may be uncomfortable due to tight fit
* are usually packaged as single devices or in boxes of single-use devices


Choosing between surgical masks and surgical N95 respirators

CDC recommends the use of surgical masks or surgical N95 respirators based on the ways that specific diseases are transmitted. For more information about CDC recommendations, see Infection Control in Healthcare Settings: Infection Control in Healthcare Settings Home | CDC Infection Control in Healthcare

Choose a surgical mask to

* help protect yourself if you may be splattered by someone else's body fluids (such as blood, respiratory secretions, vomit, urine or feces).
* help protect others if you are performing surgery, are caring for an open wound, or if you are sick.

Choose a surgical N95 respirator to provide the same protections as a surgical mask AND

* help protect yourself if you will be exposed to very small particles (e.g., fine aerosolized droplets) such as those produced by coughing.
* care for persons with known or suspected pulmonary and laryngeal tuberculosis per Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations.

Non-medical respirators

FDA regulates as devices those respirators and other articles that are intended for use in preventing or treating infectious disease. There are a variety of respirators available for various occupational exposures that do not make medical claims and are not regulated by FDA. Many of these respirators are intended to filter out particles of dust and mist from wood, metal, and masonry work. Non-medical respirators are available from many sources including hardware stores and online. Non-medical respirators may look very similar to one another and to respirators that are regulated by FDA. However, there are differences among these respirators and between these non-medical respirators and respirators that have been cleared by FDA as surgical N95 respirators.

Only respirators that have passed specific testing by NIOSH may be labeled as NIOSH-certified. Each NIOSH-certified respirator contains a rating, such as N95, which refers to its certified level of filtration efficiency. If a non-medical respirator is not labeled as NIOSH-certified, it has not been evaluated by the government to determine whether or not it works.

Although NIOSH-certified nonmedical respirators have met filtration efficiency requirements, they are not subject to the additional requirements of FDA-cleared surgical N95 respirators (i.e. fluid and flammability resistance).

* Additional Information About Respirators for Public Health Emergencies: Respirators for Public Health Emergencies

What you should know before using surgical masks and surgical N95 respirators

* The use of surgical masks and surgical N95 respirators alone will not fully protect you from acquiring an infection. Other infection control practices such as hand-washing, isolating infected patients, and practicing appropriate coughing etiquette, are also important to minimize your risk of infection.
* Surgical N95 respirators must be fit properly. A surgical N95 respirator that has not been fitted properly may leave unprotected gaps between the respirator and your face. These gaps will impair the respirator’s effectiveness. Facial hair or unusual facial features make it difficult to fit surgical N95 respirators properly.
* Be aware that surgical masks are not fit-tested to your face and may leave unprotected gaps between the mask and your face.
* Be aware that masks lose their protective properties and must be changed when they become wet from saliva or respiratory secretions.
* Know that surgical masks and surgical N95 respirators are not tested against specific microorganisms and should not claim to prevent specific diseases.
* See CDC recommendations for using surgical masks and surgical N95 respirators in the care of patients needing isolation precautions (Guidelines for Isolation Precautions in Hospitals: Part II: Guideline for Isolation Precautions in Hospitals | CDC Infection Control in Healthcare).
* Never reuse surgical masks or surgical N95 respirators.
* Never wash or disinfect surgical masks or surgical N95 respirators.
* Never share surgical masks or surgical N95 respirators with others.
* See About PPE (US FDA/CDRH: Personal Protective Equipment - About Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) (http://www.fda.gov/cdrh/ppe/about.html - broken link)) for information on disposing of surgical masks and surgical N95 respirators.

Find all FDA-cleared surgical masks and surgical N95 respirators

FDA’s Devices@FDA website lets you search for medical devices that FDA has cleared or approved, including personal protective equipment.

Search for all FDA-cleared surgical masks: Devices@FDA)

Search for all FDA-cleared surgical N95 respirators: Devices@FDA)
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Old 04-27-2009, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Niles, Michigan
1,692 posts, read 2,281,191 times
Reputation: 846
Is it just me or should we just chill. Everything on the news is about this but those that have had in the US only one had to go to the hospital. We have had flu since when. I would think the President should be worried since the guy that gave him a tour when the president was there not long ago just died. Mabe I 'm wrong but all this don't panic makes people panic. I believe they will put a restiction to travel to New Mexico. But New Mexico I heard the people didn't seek help until it was too late. Also is their health care the same and here. Like everything do not panic but be careful. What about food and stuff that comes from there. i feel sorry for them.
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Old 04-27-2009, 02:49 PM
 
Location: NC Native
197 posts, read 322,856 times
Reputation: 127
I have been listening to the radio reports and reading a little about this on the web. They say the biggest preventitive is cleanliness and that people should wash their hands with warm soapy water frequently. They also say that if you shake hands a lot that you should carry hand sanitizer and use it afterwards.

This could, of course, lead to an awkward silence when you pull out your hand sanitizer and spritz yourself with Lysol in the conference room.
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