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Old 06-02-2009, 08:54 PM
JL JL started this thread
 
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My nephew is around 9 yrs old and is pretty tall for his age. His feet are growing pretty quick. My brother is starting to notice that his son's feet are flat. This leaves me to a question, would it be good for my brother to start buying shoe insoles,orthotics with arch support for this son at this age? The reason is that if his son is still growing along with his feet, maybe the arch support will create an arch in his feet, thus giving his feet some arch when becomes a young to adult teenager. Is this possible? Thanks.

Last edited by JL; 06-02-2009 at 09:12 PM..
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Old 06-02-2009, 10:47 PM
 
Location: North Adams, MA
746 posts, read 2,986,738 times
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In my experience it won't help a bit. I have flat feet, tried everything and all arch supports etc. did was make my feet really hurt. I leave them alone and they are fine. I even managed to pass the physical to get into the Navy. Not so sure about the Army, though.

The two best things about flat feet are:

1) They are great for feeling and finding buried clams. As a kid I was the champion clamdigger on Long Island.

3) They are fantastic if you want to be a ballet dancer since they provide an almost un-tippable platform upon which to lift the ballerinas.

For most people, they are not a problem, so tell mom not to worry about it.
And don't do home remedies without consulting a foot doctor. You could do more harm than you realize.
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Old 06-03-2009, 06:22 AM
 
43,012 posts, read 82,209,925 times
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OMG. I'm so disappointed in the previous recommendation! That might have been his/her experience, but it's certainly not 'most' people's experience like litlux believes. The possible complications that can result from not correcting flat feet dictate that it shouldn't be so easily disregarded.

Children with flat feet often have pain when they run. The pain serverely hinders their athletic ability, something that's important to many boys. They still play sports, but they aren't as fast and end up limping after a while. The pain isn't directly in the bottom of the foot. If I recall correctly, the pain is in the growth plate near the ankle, back of the ankle or just above ankle on the leg. Serious problems can occure if the growth plate is continually aggrevated and inflamed. Permanent damage to the growth plate is possible.

My son has flat feet and his life was greatly improved by getting orthopedic inserts specially made for his feet by a podiatrist. Don't just buy them off the rack. Don't have anyone but a podiatrist make them. It's VERY expensive but well worth it.

We always had a hard time finding shoes that fit him because his feet were so wide. It turns out that his feet aren't wide when his arch is corrected. Letting the feet stay flat, flattens out the feet to make them wider than they really are. It's so much easier to buy shoes now with orthopedic inserts!

As for the military, recruiters from all branches have told us that flat feet are accepted into the military because it's a condition that can be corrected with orthopedic inserts.

Orthopedic inserts won't permanently correct an arch (like it seems the OP was hoping). They merely provide support to the arch of the foot when worn.
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Old 06-03-2009, 10:13 AM
 
8,416 posts, read 32,523,146 times
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Ask your doctor to see if the flat foot is affecting his knee. The flat foot can make the foot roll inward and put stress on the knee and joint distress rise up through the entire body with age. I think wearing the proper athletic shoe and being athletically involved improved mine.
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Old 06-03-2009, 10:52 AM
 
3,750 posts, read 9,449,116 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hopes View Post
OMG. I'm so disappointed in the previous recommendation! That might have been his/her experience, but it's certainly not 'most' people's experience like litlux believes. The possible complications that can result from not correcting flat feet dictate that it shouldn't be so easily disregarded.

Children with flat feet often have pain when they run. The pain serverely hinders their athletic ability, something that's important to many boys. They still play sports, but they aren't as fast and end up limping after a while. The pain isn't directly in the bottom of the foot. If I recall correctly, the pain is in the growth plate near the ankle, back of the ankle or just above ankle on the leg. Serious problems can occure if the growth plate is continually aggrevated and inflamed. Permanent damage to the growth plate is possible.

My son has flat feet and his life was greatly improved by getting orthopedic inserts specially made for his feet by a podiatrist. Don't just buy them off the rack. Don't have anyone but a podiatrist make them. It's VERY expensive but well worth it.

We always had a hard time finding shoes that fit him because his feet were so wide. It turns out that his feet aren't wide when his arch is corrected. Letting the feet stay flat, flattens out the feet to make them wider than they really are. It's so much easier to buy shoes now with orthopedic inserts!

As for the military, recruiters from all branches have told us that flat feet are accepted into the military because it's a condition that can be corrected with orthopedic inserts.

Orthopedic inserts won't permanently correct an arch (like it seems the OP was hoping). They merely provide support to the arch of the foot when worn.
Actually, you are both right...

There are two types of flat feet....flexible and rigid...

Flexible flat feet don't require treatment, and in fact treatment with orthotics might aggravate what is normally an asymptomatic condition...

Rigid flat feet, which it sounds like you had, is best served by treatment like you suggest.
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Old 06-03-2009, 11:11 AM
 
Location: Wethersfield, CT
1,268 posts, read 3,460,580 times
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I have flat feet. Shoes with arch insoles hurt me after a while. Even certain sneakers. I also walk tip-toed - always have. I don't know if this is due to the fact of my flat feet, or that I was born with a hip condition and was in a body cast as a baby until i was over a year old. I also notice now that i'm in my 30's, I cannot wear heals anymore. Also, when I'm using the elliptical machine at the gym, my toes become numb and hurt.
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Old 06-03-2009, 11:36 AM
 
43,012 posts, read 82,209,925 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluedevilz View Post
Actually, you are both right...

There are two types of flat feet....flexible and rigid...

Flexible flat feet don't require treatment, and in fact treatment with orthotics might aggravate what is normally an asymptomatic condition...

Rigid flat feet, which it sounds like you had, is best served by treatment like you suggest.
Thanks! That further validates the importance of seeing a podiatrist for diagnosis!
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Old 06-03-2009, 07:14 PM
 
12,604 posts, read 16,613,448 times
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My sister has flat feet and yrs ago when we were kids she had to wear a brace type of contraption up her legs and special shoes.
I would go to a specialist and hear what they have to say. You certainly do not want to do nothing and have the child be affected in some sort of way that was preventable.
Good luck
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Old 06-04-2009, 11:09 AM
 
Location: Summerville, SC
1,149 posts, read 3,554,354 times
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I have flat feet. I was a young child in the 80s, and threw a fit because my mother didn't want me to wear "jelly shoes" as a result - I won that battle, since I rarely threw fits

I also ran intramural track in high school without much of a problem. I don't have pain due to it, so I assume it is the "better" version of having flat feet. Then again my feet are a disaster as it is - flat and I inherited my grandmother's bunions, wish the surgery wasn't so debilitating
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Old 06-04-2009, 05:06 PM
 
Location: In the woods next to the ocean
4,540 posts, read 11,711,604 times
Reputation: 8881
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hopes View Post

As for the military, recruiters from all branches have told us that flat feet are accepted into the military because it's a condition that can be corrected with orthopedic inserts.
When I got drafted, I told the recruiter that I had flat feet.
He told me that was OK because they had flat shoes.

So then I told him I was gay.
He winked and blew me a kiss.
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