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Old 12-10-2011, 08:31 PM
 
Location: Texas
14,078 posts, read 17,027,829 times
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Cream cheese is a little different from block cheese. I'd toss it. As for block cheese? Unless it's just too dry to eat, simply carve off the mold and chow down.

For everything else, remember the Red Cross 3-4 rule: 4 hours at between 40 degrees and 140 degrees....throw it away!
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Old 12-11-2011, 08:46 AM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,131 posts, read 26,246,015 times
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If it tastes fine, it's fine.
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Old 12-11-2011, 08:58 AM
 
Location: Barrington, IL area
1,594 posts, read 2,535,346 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CAVA1990 View Post
If it tastes fine, it's fine.
Not true at all.
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Old 12-11-2011, 05:48 PM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,131 posts, read 26,246,015 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gramirez2012 View Post
Not true at all.
Give me one example of someone who got sick eating cream cheese a few hours old. Believe me, anything too weak to notice by smelling or tasting is going to be destroyed by your stomach acid.
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Old 12-11-2011, 06:09 PM
 
Location: Barrington, IL area
1,594 posts, read 2,535,346 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CAVA1990 View Post
Give me one example of someone who got sick eating cream cheese a few hours old. Believe me, anything too weak to notice by smelling or tasting is going to be destroyed by your stomach acid.
Food does not have to smell or taste weird for it to be contaminated. In fact, most of the time it doesn't.
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Old 12-11-2011, 07:24 PM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,131 posts, read 26,246,015 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gramirez2012 View Post
Food does not have to smell or taste weird for it to be contaminated. In fact, most of the time it doesn't.
But most commercial cream cheese does. Pasteurization and hot packing methods kill the pathogens that would be harmful before you were able to taste or smell them. Spoiled cream cheese will normally taste bitter, “yeasty,” sour, dry, or watery and may develop greenish mold, a “damp” odor, and a grainy or chalky texture. If it's mixed into something else, that could mask the off taste.

Most food poisoning involves unpasteurized products.
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Old 12-11-2011, 07:29 PM
 
Location: Barrington, IL area
1,594 posts, read 2,535,346 times
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Quote:
Myth #7: Leftovers are safe to eat until they smell bad.
Fact: The kinds of bacteria that cause food poisoning do not affect the look, smell, or taste of food.
Source: Food Safety Myths Exposed | FoodSafety.gov

Quote:
How Do People Get Salmonella?
Salmonella live in the intestinal tracts of humans and other animals, including birds. Salmonella are usually transmitted to humans by eating foods contaminated with animal feces. Contaminated foods usually look and smell normal. Contaminated foods are often of animal origin, such as beef, poultry, milk, or eggs, but any food, including vegetables, may become contaminated. Thorough cooking kills Salmonella. Food may also become contaminated by the hands of an infected food handler who did not wash hands with soap after using the bathroom.
Source: CDC - Diagnosis and Treatment - Salmonella
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Old 12-11-2011, 08:59 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,668 posts, read 71,523,609 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Okiegirlfriend View Post
http://www.nsf.org/consumer/newsroom..._leftovers.pdf

It says leftovers should be refrigerated after 4 hours.
Would that be a variable, according to the temperature in your kitchen? Can you provide us with a formula to adjust that time, depending on whether it's cool in winter or hot in summer in the kitchen? Does it matter if it has been re-lidded or not?

Would it make a difference, whether a clean or pre-used spoon has been used to spoon it out of the tub? Or if the tub is almost empty, or almost full, which would affect how long it would take to reach ambient temperature if left out.

Is 4 hours the rule for all leftovers, regardless of their composition?
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Old 04-16-2012, 11:19 PM
 
1 posts, read 10,958 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TKramar View Post
On the other hand, keeping the food in the refrigerator is no guarantee that it will remain edible.

I had a jar of alfredo sauce made by Ragu. I used it on some pizzas about a month ago, and still had a bit left.

When I opened the jar, it seemed a little more "watery" than it had when I'd previously used it. But I hadn't smelled or tasted anything funny about it. I tried to stir it up a little bit before using it to top some noodles. Later that evening, I felt a little nauseous, like I needed to vomit.

It is possible that my pork steak didn't cook all the way through, but I put the skillet in the oven after browning it up, to help ensure that it had the opportunity to cook in the middle. Nope, I blame that alfredo sauce.
PLEASE PEOPLE:
Once A JAR Sauce has been OPENED, slow bacteria growth process has started, even when refrigerated. Using a jar of month old Alfredo Sauce is taking a huge health risk. That would be the same as making it from scratch, putting it in a glass bowl with saran wrap in the refrigerator and then using it a month later. No one would dream of doing that. L.M.D.
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Old 04-17-2012, 08:32 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,668 posts, read 71,523,609 times
Reputation: 35864
Quote:
Originally Posted by Okiegirlfriend View Post
http://www.nsf.org/consumer/newsroom..._leftovers.pdf

It says leftovers should be refrigerated after 4 hours.
In the text it says 2 hours, and in the picture caption it says 4 hours. That's what I love about glitzy internet "advice" with lots of pretty pictures and no proofreading after some hack intern throws it together. But be sure to take it as gospel, and follow the detailed advice to the letter.

Rules are to guide the wise and command the foolish.
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