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Old 11-04-2009, 09:37 PM
 
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I hope I'm in the right forum, but, I just wanted to know, how many of you have experienced lucid dreaming, and if you have experienced it, could you tell us about it and roughly how often it happens to you?

As for myself, it seems to happen ONCE a year for me, and my last lucid dream was approximately 3 days ago! I knew it was lucid as soon as it happened, because, at that moment, I was very frightened because I felt a "shift" as if something disengaged, however, I told myself not to be afraid and the fear slooowly went away.

Well, the setting was my old neighborhood where I grew up as a child (odd) and I was floating around through it IN FULL CONTROL! If I wanted to go up, I went up, if I wanted to go left, I went left. It was awesome because it was as if I had escaped earth and made it to another dimension.

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Old 11-04-2009, 09:46 PM
 
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I just looked up lucid dreaming and I don't think I have EVER had one. My guess as to what lucid dreaming was was all wrong. I have had vivid dreams where it felt completely real and I woke up still connected to the dream, but never a lucid dream.
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Old 11-04-2009, 10:30 PM
 
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
2,903 posts, read 11,163,094 times
Reputation: 1804
Since this is about psychological / mental / health and well being it seems that this forum is an appropriate place for this thread ... better here than over on the often rabidly angry religion&philosophy forum.
I'm not sure what the exact definition of lucid dreaming is or how you are using it but, as i perceive, the goal or objective in intentional dream-work is to wake up within the dream and realize that you are dreaming.
When you
wake up within the dream and realize that you are dreaming, you are then able to make conscious decisions within the dream and direct your dream with that heightened sense of awareness.
You are dreaming but you are aware that you are dreaming so the ability to direct the dream is coming from a higher state of awareness "outside" of your dreaming state ... from the aspect of mind or consciousness that is aware that you are dreaming.
It's difficult to explain.
Also, in Tibetan Dream Yoga (and other advanced dream practices but the Tibetan Buddhists are pretty deep and rigorous) there is a rather clear understanding of different kinds or levels of dreams.
What you're referring to as "lucid dreaming" may or may not be such 'cause, like i said, i can't remember how lucid dreaming is defined and as i'm familiar with different paradigms regarding dreams (but haven't studied or practiced for awhile) i may get definitions confused but i'm pretty sure that lucid dreaming involves having the awareness that you are dreaming.
Anyway, in Tibetan Buddhism, lucid dreaming or more accurately, Dream Yoga is a practice whereby you train yourself to awaken within the dream but it's not just for kicks or to have a good time in your dream life.
The "purpose" or goal is to come to the realization that what we refer to as the waking state ... normal day time state ... is also a "dream" or rather is similarly illusory as our night time dreaming state.
In Buddhism (Buddha literally means, "awakened one", ie; one who has realized the true nature of reality ... the nature of all phenomena ... that all is both illusory and transitory) it is accepted that "all sentient beings have Buddha nature" ... that we all have the potential to become Buddhas ... to awaken from this dream we call life.
Dream Yoga is one practice to attain this awakened state.
So, if you are at all spiritually inclined, the fact that you have these clear dreams, would make you a good "candidate" for something like Tibetan Dream Yoga.
It's a strength of even a gift that you may want to use with purpose / intentionality.
What distinguishes Buddhism from other paths is that there is fundamental intention to realize oneself (realize ones true nature) not for the sake of oneself ... but rather for the "benefit of all sentient beings".
That's what Bodhichitta is.
This is a Tibetan Buddhist "prayer" or words of intention that one recites before going to sleep.

"May i awaken within the dream and grasp the fact that i am dreaming so that all dreamlike beings may likewise awaken from the nightmare of illusory suffering and confusion."


Anyway, there are quite a few resources available for either this kind of Buddhist study or other dream studies that can take you deeper into dream work but without any religiosity.
However, the teachings involved in Tibetan Dream Yoga can be practiced by anyone who resonates with the basic principles which, btw, need not be in conflict with any other religion or with a lack of religion.
All that said, i think taking cues at least (if not fully immersing yourself in the practice) from people who are deeply skilled and aware is key unless you just wanna play around ... which is fine too.
Sweet dreams.
p.s. ... i have no idea how or if you are inclined spiritually, but here's a web-page that may give you some insight.
http://www.plotinus.com/dreams_in_th...ocess_copy.htm

Last edited by coyoteskye; 11-04-2009 at 11:02 PM..
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Old 11-04-2009, 10:43 PM
 
Location: SoCal
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happens to me all the time............ i hate it i feel i never det enough good sleep......
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Old 11-05-2009, 05:27 AM
 
Location: Way South of the Volvo Line
2,776 posts, read 6,964,466 times
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I experience a lucid dream every once in a while. Usually it is a nightmare and I have to steel myself against a threat. I don't remember ever trying to control a good dream...then I just go with it.
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Old 11-05-2009, 06:29 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
16,840 posts, read 51,286,023 times
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Used to have them regularly, don't as much anymore. Like astral projection, they have limited usefulness, although the initial rush of being able to fly and all that is interesting.
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Old 11-05-2009, 08:46 AM
 
Location: right here!
1,057 posts, read 1,679,421 times
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I have them pretty frequently, about once a week. That said, I always write my dreams down as soon as I wake up, have for years. I think it makes me more aware of them as I'm in having them.

I'm also a buddhist, don't meditate exactly but do practice mindfulness. I think that helps too.
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Old 11-05-2009, 06:32 PM
 
Location: Northern NH
4,551 posts, read 9,859,296 times
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Usually about once or twice a month and they are horrible. People are being dropped from great heights, or being cut in half over and over. Toilets overflow onto me but I usually know it is a dream and I will wake up. This week some of a dream that I had about having my dog with me at work started to come true that had ended with many people being cut in half so I had a minor anxiety attack at work since this was not good.
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Old 11-05-2009, 09:31 PM
 
3,440 posts, read 7,046,744 times
Reputation: 2374
Quote:
Originally Posted by coyoteskye View Post
Since this is about psychological / mental / health and well being it seems that this forum is an appropriate place for this thread ... better here than over on the often rabidly angry religion&philosophy forum.
I'm not sure what the exact definition of lucid dreaming is or how you are using it but, as i perceive, the goal or objective in intentional dream-work is to wake up within the dream and realize that you are dreaming.
When you
wake up within the dream and realize that you are dreaming, you are then able to make conscious decisions within the dream and direct your dream with that heightened sense of awareness.
You are dreaming but you are aware that you are dreaming so the ability to direct the dream is coming from a higher state of awareness "outside" of your dreaming state ... from the aspect of mind or consciousness that is aware that you are dreaming.
It's difficult to explain.
Also, in Tibetan Dream Yoga (and other advanced dream practices but the Tibetan Buddhists are pretty deep and rigorous) there is a rather clear understanding of different kinds or levels of dreams.
What you're referring to as "lucid dreaming" may or may not be such 'cause, like i said, i can't remember how lucid dreaming is defined and as i'm familiar with different paradigms regarding dreams (but haven't studied or practiced for awhile) i may get definitions confused but i'm pretty sure that lucid dreaming involves having the awareness that you are dreaming.
Anyway, in Tibetan Buddhism, lucid dreaming or more accurately, Dream Yoga is a practice whereby you train yourself to awaken within the dream but it's not just for kicks or to have a good time in your dream life.
The "purpose" or goal is to come to the realization that what we refer to as the waking state ... normal day time state ... is also a "dream" or rather is similarly illusory as our night time dreaming state.
In Buddhism (Buddha literally means, "awakened one", ie; one who has realized the true nature of reality ... the nature of all phenomena ... that all is both illusory and transitory) it is accepted that "all sentient beings have Buddha nature" ... that we all have the potential to become Buddhas ... to awaken from this dream we call life.
Dream Yoga is one practice to attain this awakened state.
So, if you are at all spiritually inclined, the fact that you have these clear dreams, would make you a good "candidate" for something like Tibetan Dream Yoga.
It's a strength of even a gift that you may want to use with purpose / intentionality.
What distinguishes Buddhism from other paths is that there is fundamental intention to realize oneself (realize ones true nature) not for the sake of oneself ... but rather for the "benefit of all sentient beings".
That's what Bodhichitta is.
This is a Tibetan Buddhist "prayer" or words of intention that one recites before going to sleep.

"May i awaken within the dream and grasp the fact that i am dreaming so that all dreamlike beings may likewise awaken from the nightmare of illusory suffering and confusion."


Anyway, there are quite a few resources available for either this kind of Buddhist study or other dream studies that can take you deeper into dream work but without any religiosity.
However, the teachings involved in Tibetan Dream Yoga can be practiced by anyone who resonates with the basic principles which, btw, need not be in conflict with any other religion or with a lack of religion.
All that said, i think taking cues at least (if not fully immersing yourself in the practice) from people who are deeply skilled and aware is key unless you just wanna play around ... which is fine too.
Sweet dreams.
p.s. ... i have no idea how or if you are inclined spiritually, but here's a web-page that may give you some insight.
Importance of Dreams in the Mystical Process

Thanks for the info! And yes, sometimes I think to myself, which side is the real side?". You know, such as, when you wake up are we just highly alert in a holographic environment.
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Old 11-05-2009, 09:35 PM
 
3,440 posts, read 7,046,744 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yellfire View Post
I have them pretty frequently, about once a week. That said, I always write my dreams down as soon as I wake up, have for years. I think it makes me more aware of them as I'm in having them.

I'm also a buddhist, don't meditate exactly but do practice mindfulness. I think that helps too.
Wow, I always wanted to do that, but I'm to lazy in that regard. It must be awesome to scroll back 15 years ago and read your dreams, or be able to look at all the info in it's totality to see if there are any fundamental patterns.

Actually, do you notice any recurring themes in you dreams?
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