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Old 12-31-2009, 11:46 AM
 
Location: Western Cary, NC
4,349 posts, read 6,486,595 times
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I have had it twice this year and thus far have not had any problems. I researched all I could find on the subject, and after weighing my options saw I really did not have a choice. I expect my hair will now turn grey, which it would have anyway, and I keep checking my memory just to be safe, but after it is all finished all I lost was the time under, and not being able to watch them operate.
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Old 12-31-2009, 12:06 PM
 
Location: galaxy far far away
3,111 posts, read 4,397,042 times
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The question really is - can you have the procedure WITHOUT General Anesthesia. My surgery this last Fall was one that could NOT be performed unless I had General Anesthesia. If I flinched or moved even a centimeter, they could have severed my spine or my carotid artery. Discuss the procedures, ask to talk with the anesthesiologist. Be very aware of all your issues and concerns and don't be afraid to ask as many questions as you can. Do a search on the hospital and the team operating on you. Make sure you have the very best.

Remember, these people do these all day long. This is "going to work" for them. They are not interested in losing patients. They DO usually know what they are doing. It is more dangerous for you to get in your car or on an airplane than it is to undergo surgery - if you are looking at numbers.

Is there a risk? Of course. Can you mitigate it? Yes. Be healthy - that's the first rule. By that I mean - take your vitamins, eat lots of greens and fresh foods. Exercise as much as your condition allows. Walk in there for surgery as healthy as you can possibly be. Make sure you get a lot of sleep in the weeks leading up to the surgery so your body and your immune system can handle the shock.

After the surgery - just know that anesthesia stays in your liver for about 6 weeks. You'll have "anesthesia brain" for awhile. I felt really dopey for a couple of months. Still have some memory issues. But I've taken steps to fix that - Physical Therapy, doing puzzles like Sudoku and crosswords -- things like that. I also did a beet cleanse after surgery, and have done that a couple more times. You want to rid your liver of all the meds you had to take to survive the surgery. That means no alcohol for awhile, too.

There are so many factors that determine your results after surgery. You DO have control over some of them. So take that control. If the surgery is necessary for your survival, as mine was, then there's no sense in getting yer undies in a twist over whether or not it's "safe." Just do every single thing you can to make sure you will be OK.

One last thing - if you don't trust your doctor, or if you find out there have been incidents of MRSA or CDiff infections (nasty life-threatening staph infections) then ask for a second opinion or get a different doctor. That is your right (at least at this moment...) Trust your gut. If your instincts tell you something is wrong, take that extra step to look at a different hospital, anesthesiologist, or surgeon.
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Old 12-31-2009, 12:18 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,527 posts, read 29,233,815 times
Reputation: 21263
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cupcake77 View Post
I am actually having 2 procedures, total approx 5 hours in surgery. One is elective. I am thinking thats why people are concerned.
You don't say what the procedures are, and it's none of my business, so I am not asking. All I am saying is that in about 99 percent of the cases where surgery is indicated can be corrected without surgery. Obviously, if you have a deviated septum or are having a growth removed, or have appendicitis, or something like that, then you would need surgery, but there are lots and lots of things out there that people are having operations for that are unnecessary. Back operations being the best example. I have read statistics out the wazoo that says over, and over and over that people who have operations on their discs do not have any improvement and VERY OFTEN the symptoms and pain gets worse almost 100 percent of the time. And yet, people keep having them.

20yrsinBranson
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Old 12-31-2009, 12:26 PM
 
Location: Greenwood Village, Colorado
2,185 posts, read 3,890,063 times
Reputation: 1536
Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
You don't say what the procedures are, and it's none of my business, so I am not asking. All I am saying is that in about 99 percent of the cases where surgery is indicated can be corrected without surgery. Obviously, if you have a deviated septum or are having a growth removed, or have appendicitis, or something like that, then you would need surgery, but there are lots and lots of things out there that people are having operations for that are unnecessary. Back operations being the best example. I have read statistics out the wazoo that says over, and over and over that people who have operations on their discs do not have any improvement and VERY OFTEN the symptoms and pain gets worse almost 100 percent of the time. And yet, people keep having them.

20yrsinBranson

The first is a myomectomy, but maybe a partical hysterectomy becaue apparently I have nothing but fibroids. I am kinda young for them, but that's what I have. the 2nd is plastic surgery to fix the scars and my stomach from 3 c sections.
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Old 12-31-2009, 01:05 PM
 
43,012 posts, read 88,958,716 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cupcake77 View Post
The first is a myomectomy, but maybe a partical hysterectomy becaue apparently I have nothing but fibroids. I am kinda young for them, but that's what I have. the 2nd is plastic surgery to fix the scars and my stomach from 3 c sections.
Hysterectomy is the surgery my sister died having. She was super young for that type of surgery too.

I'm not trying to scare you. It's extremely rare to die during a hysterectomy. But you're asking if you should write a Will, and I think writing a Will would be wise.
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Old 12-31-2009, 02:53 PM
 
5,905 posts, read 5,080,473 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
People die of anesthesia shock on a regular basis.
You make it sound like patients are dropping like flies. Care to offer a percentage or some other number based on facts and not scare tactics?

If it were true, then it would mean that health professionals like myself would be encountering these intraoperative deaths caused by anesthesia on a "regular basis" in patient operative records.

Luckily, that is not the case.
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Old 12-31-2009, 03:04 PM
 
Location: 38į14′45″N 122į37′53″W
4,152 posts, read 9,579,339 times
Reputation: 3398
Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
You don't say what the procedures are, and it's none of my business, so I am not asking. All I am saying is that in about 99 percent of the cases where surgery is indicated can be corrected without surgery. Obviously, if you have a deviated septum or are having a growth removed, or have appendicitis, or something like that, then you would need surgery, but there are lots and lots of things out there that people are having operations for that are unnecessary. Back operations being the best example. I have read statistics out the wazoo that says over, and over and over that people who have operations on their discs do not have any improvement and VERY OFTEN the symptoms and pain gets worse almost 100 percent of the time. And yet, people keep having them.

20yrsinBranson
What?! 99% where did you get that number from? I think you are exaggerating. That's a ridiculous assertion on your part.
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Old 01-01-2010, 05:38 PM
 
Location: Western Cary, NC
4,349 posts, read 6,486,595 times
Reputation: 7265
Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
You don't say what the procedures are, and it's none of my business, so I am not asking. All I am saying is that in about 99 percent of the cases where surgery is indicated can be corrected without surgery. Obviously, if you have a deviated septum or are having a growth removed, or have appendicitis, or something like that, then you would need surgery, but there are lots and lots of things out there that people are having operations for that are unnecessary. Back operations being the best example. I have read statistics out the wazoo that says over, and over and over that people who have operations on their discs do not have any improvement and VERY OFTEN the symptoms and pain gets worse almost 100 percent of the time. And yet, people keep having them.

20yrsinBranson
I donít totally agree. My wife had back surgery after trying all other options. A year later she said she was 100% back to normal; my neighbor also had back surgery, and after a double fusion is back to normal. My surgeries were due to an accident. One to repair an injured knee, the next to rebuild my shoulder, I asked for blocks on both and was told the complexity required me to be put under. The option I had, was walk in pain, or get the knee replaced. It was not a hard decision. The shoulder was to install steel plates which would aid in the shattered bones rebuilding. With the shoulder they did a block and put me under, and the knee just put me under. The knee is back to normal, the shoulder is already better, and surgery was just two weeks ago. I think most people try to avoid surgery, and most Doctors donít cut away for the fun of it. Most of us weigh the options and aim for the best path to a normal life.
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Old 01-01-2010, 06:33 PM
 
5,683 posts, read 8,878,435 times
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General anesthesia in itself need not be dangerous, if you are in the hands of a highly competent anesthetist and have chosen a top-tier hospital for your procedure. Yes, people die as a result of complications of general anesthesia - my mother was nearly one of those statistics, in fact - but in the vast majority of cases, those complications are due either to an under-qualified anesthesiologist, a poor-performing hospital, or underlying conditions in the patient that caused complications.

For that reason, you need to exercise some due diligence. Research the hospital where you plan to have the surgery performed. In many states, you can find a listing of hospitals and their ratings for safety, mandatory nurse overtime (a big problem in many facilities), occurrences of nosocomial infections, rates of surgical complications, and other categories.

Then research your surgeon for the same kinds of questions. And if possible (it isn't always), try to find out who your anesthesiologist or anesthetist will be ahead of time, and research him or her.

The next part of your responsibility is to be scrupulously thorough and honest in responding to the pre-anesthesia questionnaire. Do you smoke? Drink? Take ANY kind of OTC medications? Be honest and tell them about it. If they put you under thinking that you're not a smoker and you really are, you are putting yourself at higher risk. If they don't know that you routinely take an antihistamine for allergies, you are putting yourself at higher risk.

And finally, obey the pre-op instructions you are given to the letter. If they tell you to go off all NSAIDs for a week before surgery, don't assume that you can go off two days beforehand and be ok. If they tell you not to drink any alcohol for 72 hours before surgery, don't go out and have a beer or three the night before.

I have been under general anesthesia three times in my adult life. I experienced no complications beyond post-operative nausea the third time, and that was pretty minimal. My mother, on the other hand, was under general anesthesia at least nine times that I know of (it could have been more than that), and she had one episode of life-threatening complications. She went into respiratory arrest during skin graft surgery after her second mastectomy, and awoke to find herself in the ICU. There were no longterm consequences, fortunately, but it scared the dickens out of all of us. She attributed that event to an incompetent anesthesiologist, which could well have been true, but there's no way at this point to be sure.

So the lesson is, do your homework ahead of time, be honest, and obey all those instructions you are given, even if they seem ridiculous. And keep a positive attitude - that is one of *the best* things within your power to influence a good outcome.

Good luck and fast healing to you!
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Old 01-01-2010, 06:58 PM
 
4,628 posts, read 9,027,023 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hopes View Post
My own sister died having a low risk, routine procedure.
I am very sorry for your loss. But even a routine surgery, as another poster stated, MUST HAVE AN ANESTHESIOLOGIST not just in the room, but administering the drug it and auditing your reactions. I recently had two concurent surgeries...I asked the physician what he was using: Profonol. Which is extremely safe when used properly - and that means CONSTANT supervision. The Anesthesiologist even came to my room after the surgeries to ensure I was recovering as expected. Two days later I received a call from him as well.

Do not be shy or polite about insisting on information. If it's a highly professional hospital, they doctors will call you before the surgery, repeat the instructions as to diet/activity, they will again ask the same questions before the surgery, as will the nurse...and they will follow up on your care.

As said, follow instructions to the letter. Be as honest with your docs as you expect them to be with you. Operations can certainly be dangerous, they are not risk freee, but they are also safe if done correctly - on your part in being completely honest with the doctor and on the doc's part.

Good luck to you.
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