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Old 01-01-2010, 07:32 PM
 
223 posts, read 502,594 times
Reputation: 369

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Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
People die of anesthesia shock on a regular basis. It's a total crap shoot. The anesthesiologist has to take into your consideration your age, weight, metabolism, health, etc., and then figure how much anesthesia to give you to take you 1/4" of an inch from death. Michael Jackson would be the perfect example of a doctor that didn't figure very well.

I have had it once in my life and never will again. The risk is too great for me to take. I have read stories about people who have had all manner of procedures under local and regional anesthesia. Even major, major operations so perhaps you can find an anesthesiologist who is willing to think outside the box and consider some alternative. I mean, honey if a woman can have a BABY without general anesthesia - then by gosh, it can be done for ANYTHING else (except maybe a major organ transplant that takes 14 - 16 hours).
Yeah it is a crap shoot if you use anesthetic medication in your bedroom with a quack physician who doesn't monitor you whatsoever.

Seriously, you believe that most surgeries should be completed without anesthesia? Could you please elaborate on your recommended methodologies? Should we go back to taking a swig of whiskey and holding a stick between our teeth?

I find it appalling that you right this baloney. The OP has genuine and understandable concerns. It is often difficult to give over your power to someone else. How about providing some accurate information?

Cupcake77, I am sure your surgeries will go well, unless you are going to the same hospital in 20yrsinBranson's town...there seems to be an unusually high mortality rate there. Good luck with your surgeries.
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Old 01-01-2010, 08:01 PM
 
Location: Lakeland, Florida
6,680 posts, read 11,893,412 times
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I have had it twice in my life. Both times I have had some type of reaction to it. I wake up shaking and can hear the Medical Personnel trying to get me to wake up. I never really have been told what happens to me as they bring me out of the anestesia, but I don't like all that shaking and then some nausea for awhile
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Old 01-01-2010, 08:06 PM
 
5,905 posts, read 5,079,972 times
Reputation: 4534
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimrob1 View Post
I have had it twice in my life. Both times I have had some type of reaction to it. I wake up shaking and can hear the Medical Personnel trying to get me to wake up. I never really have been told what happens to me as they bring me out of the anestesia, but I don't like all that shaking and then some nausea for awhile
I wondered about that, as well...turns out it may be due to the cold temperature associated with the operating room:

Ask an Expert: Shaking or shivering after anesthesia

I was terrified of the thought of post-surgical nausea. So, prior to surgery during the visit with the anesthesiologist, I made a point of asking them to give me something for it before I was extubated, and they were happy to oblige for both surgeries I had (gallbladder and appendectomy).
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Old 01-01-2010, 08:10 PM
 
Location: 3814′45″N 12237′53″W
4,152 posts, read 9,578,000 times
Reputation: 3398
I just had major surgery this past year, lo and behold, there were no other options, I had to have surgery or die...so, I figured hey, might as well stick around.
And as I live and breathe...here I am. My biggest problem after the surgery was not at all from the general anesthesia, that's for sure. My MIL has had way too many surgeries for cancer over the past 5 years or so, she gets nausea after surgery and she says it's from the anesthesia, apparently that's rather common.
Anesthesiologist I had, I met the morning of my procedure, as well as his resident who was also present during the whole surgery (3.5 hours worth) was there the whole time too and I can't imagine that there even are places where people are willing to go under general without an anesthesiologist doing it?! But apparently there are places like that...
So get all the info you can about who is doing your surgery, anesthesia etc. and meet them during your pre-op appointments if possible.
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Old 01-02-2010, 12:52 AM
 
43,012 posts, read 88,940,518 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wicked Felina View Post
I am very sorry for your loss. But even a routine surgery, as another poster stated, MUST HAVE AN ANESTHESIOLOGIST not just in the room, but administering the drug it and auditing your reactions.
I'm very aware of the rolls of CRNAs and Anesthesiologists. I used to work for an anethesia school. My sister's death wouldn't have been prevented by an Anesthesiologist being in the room. (For all I know, there was one in the room.) She died an hour after she left the recovery room. People can die from Anesthesia under the best circumstances.
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Old 01-02-2010, 12:53 AM
 
43,012 posts, read 88,940,518 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimrob1 View Post
I have had it twice in my life. Both times I have had some type of reaction to it. I wake up shaking and can hear the Medical Personnel trying to get me to wake up. I never really have been told what happens to me as they bring me out of the anestesia, but I don't like all that shaking and then some nausea for awhile
I wake up screaming. My son does too. It's really weird how people react differently to anesthesia.
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Old 01-02-2010, 07:59 AM
 
Location: Mostly in my head
19,631 posts, read 53,468,042 times
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I have always had a visit from the anesthesiologist prior to the surgery, even when it was going to be just conscious sedation (AKA twilight sleep). I weould not go into surgery w/o such a visit.
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Old 01-02-2010, 10:00 AM
 
Location: Ocean Shores, WA
5,082 posts, read 12,577,145 times
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My first experience with anesthesia was in 1945 when I had my tonsils removed. I remember being held down by several nurses in white, stiffly starched uniforms, while the doctor held a mask over my face and told me to breathe and count from 100 backwards.

The Ether fumes were suffocating and I couldn't breathe. I remember yelling "Stop! You're killing me!" and then the world exploded in a huge red ball.
That's all I remember.

For about 40 years afterward, I couldn't go into a doctor's or dentist's office, or get a shot or blood test without having a panic induced mini-seizure. Sometimes, just seeing white uniforms or smelling "medical odors" like alcohol, was enough to set it off. Sometimes I would pass out in the waiting room.

My next experience with anesthesia was in 2004 when I had a hip replacement. Procedures had improved significantly since 1945. I remember talking to the doctor in the prep room before the operation and the next thing I knew I was in the recovery room and he was saying "It's all over. Everything went just fine."

The only bad part of it was that it took weeks for my bladder and bowel function to get back to normal.
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Old 01-02-2010, 11:12 AM
 
43,012 posts, read 88,940,518 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthernBelleInUtah View Post
I have always had a visit from the anesthesiologist prior to the surgery, even when it was going to be just conscious sedation (AKA twilight sleep). I weould not go into surgery w/o such a visit.
Although I'm sure you are aware, I want to elaborate for others who may not be:

A visit by an anesthesiologist does not mean the anesthesiologist will be the one administering the anesthesia. And often patients are often unaware that the pre-surgery visit they receive from the anesthesia department isn't an anesthesiologist but a CRNA. Typically (where I live), various CRNAs administer anesthesia in the various operating rooms with one or two anesthesiologists on the operating room floor in case of an emergency in one of the operating rooms. However, a patient does have a right to request an anesthesiologist to be the one who administers and monitors the anesthesia throughout the entire surgery.

On a side note, I'm not sure I'd be comfortable demanding an anesthesiologist to be present throughout my entire surgery. I wouldn't want someone who doesn't want to be there doing the job. The reality is that CRNAs who have been administering anesthesia for many years often have more experience (hours administering anesthesia) than some anesthesiologists because anesthesiologists are often in a supervisory roll at many hospitals. Of course, this all depends on the specific hospital, heathcare system or region of the country.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cupcake77 View Post
Was this recent? because just dec 29 2009 you stated this

"Every single family member (aunts, uncles, cousins, parents (dead)) has diabetes except for my sister and me. "

You don't mention a deceased sister only parents but you do mention a living sister.
Why would you dig up old posts about my family members when I'm sharing about the death of a sister?

I'll answer your inappropriate question anyway:

----It's possible to have multiple siblings, which I do. I have more than one sibling (brothers and sisters) still alive, but only one sister and myself doesn't have diabetes.

----It's irrelevant that I failed to list every family member in my family in the quote you chose. I was merely providing a quick example that I was discussing members outside of my immediate family that included uncles an cousins too. Heck, I even failed to mention grandparents, but that doesn't mean that I don't have grandparents. Everyone has grandparents somewhere---even people born in test tubes.

----The sister who died due to anesthesia complications after having a hysterectomy didn't have diabetes. She died approximately 15 years ago. If she had lived longer, she most likely would have developed diabetes because she was overweight. The sentence you quoted was discussing present tense, not the status of diabetes in my family 15 years ago. And it wasn't all inclusive because there are many other family members not listed who have diabetes.

For the record, all of my family members on one side of my family has died due to complications of diabetes, except for those who died in accidental death type deaths. The rest of my living relatives on that side of the family and my immediate family all have diabetes except for me and one sister.

This isn't a legal document, but merely an attempt to provide some clarification so the above explanation may not be entirely inclusive of all family members.

I can't imagine someone challenging the validity of a family member's death, but I'll give you the benefit of the doubt since you are the OP, and you are extra concerned because you will be having the type of surgery my sister had. I don't want to provide more information publicly here because deaths from hysterectomy are so rare someone might be able to figure out who my sister was based on what I've already shared. If you want more information, you're welcome to contact me via DM.
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Old 01-02-2010, 11:17 AM
 
4,628 posts, read 9,025,724 times
Reputation: 4225
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cupcake77 View Post
How dangerous is general anesthesia? I am supposed to have a procedure done and I mention to people that my doctors are doing general anesthesia I get a reaction as if it's a bad thing and I should make a will.
Well, I'm glad you got such supportive and information-filled posts to help you with your decision. IMO it's a good thing to have a living will anyway. Surgeries or no surgeries.

It is also important for those who are more schooled in this subject, to explain exactly what type of anesthesia was used in their procedure. If they didn't bother to ask the surgery staff, I'd take what they say with a grain of salt & move on. It is important to ask. Clearly anesthesia drugs not all equal in effect, nor are they all the same.

Why don't you just ask your doctor(s) - as I'm sure you have.And good luck with your procedure.
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