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View Poll Results: You're no longer young at:
18 2 2.47%
21 1 1.23%
25 4 4.94%
30 19 23.46%
35 15 18.52%
40 16 19.75%
50 24 29.63%
Voters: 81. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-06-2010, 12:08 AM
 
10,630 posts, read 22,748,468 times
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I agree that you stop being "young" sometime in the mid-30s, but that doesn't mean you're suddenly "old" or have to start acting "old." It just means your chronological age has moved you into the next age bracket and you have different life experiences and cultural references than the new "young" people behind you.

When you're old enough that you could hypothetically have a kid now in their teens then you're no longer young, no matter how "young" you feel.

I don't think society should diminish people who are "old," but at the same time I wish society would stop using the word "young" to mean something other than just age. Young people can be responsible; old people can be irresponsible. Age doesn't necessarily bring better judgement, although admittedly for most people more experiences (which of course do accumulate with time) make it easier to make good judgement calls, but that's not a given.

The other day I got carded while buying a bottle of wine and my first thought was that they were checking my ID because I was using a credit card; it only hit me after that the carding was because I was buying booze. That's certainly not any kind of formal gauge, but it got me to thinking that there was a shift sometime in there somewhere. At one point when I didn't get carded I was happy because I figured I looked "old", or at least like an adult, and now I'm surprised (and I admit, sometimes pleased) when I do get carded.

Working in a field where I'm surrounded by a large number of older people (lots of retired volunteers, plus older baby boomer colleagues) I now informally think of anyone not retired as "young." 60? Young! 50? Really young! 40? Extra, extra young! (it's also reinforced the idea that age really is just a number, at least when it comes to personality.)

I think I'm old enough that if someone tells me I'm "just a kid" then I could possibly find that a good thing; the opposite of that is to realize that if I was to somehow achieve some major accomplishment I would no longer be described as "young." If you certain things at a young enough age you're news-worthy; do it in your 30s or 40s and you're just one of many. Do it for the first time at a much, much older age and you're news-worthy again, though.
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Old 01-06-2010, 02:06 AM
 
Location: Somewhere.
9,751 posts, read 21,603,122 times
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Your poll didn't have enough answers. 50 is hardly old.
Why get old at all? So your body gets older, your mind does not have to!
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Old 01-06-2010, 01:03 PM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,754 posts, read 16,450,212 times
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justcause asks:
And What Age Do You Stop Being "Young?"
For me, the age at which I am no longer 'young' is a moving target...always about 5 years down the road.
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Old 01-06-2010, 01:20 PM
 
Location: In the Pearl of the Purchase, Ky
6,959 posts, read 12,375,199 times
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My wife, in her late 50s says she is old. I keep telling her you're as young as you feel and she feels fine to me! I don't think you can say what age you quit being young. Everybody's different!
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Old 01-06-2010, 02:30 PM
 
8,415 posts, read 34,325,091 times
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I think people just need to stop placing a value on one "gem" of existance. Each age bracket has its bonus and its bogus points. I like older people and always have. I really don't see what is prized about being young other than tight skin and fluid joints. Other than that it kinda sucks.
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Old 01-06-2010, 02:52 PM
 
4,721 posts, read 13,612,077 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pitt_transplant View Post
I think people just need to stop placing a value on one "gem" of existance. Each age bracket has its bonus and its bogus points. I like older people and always have. I really don't see what is prized about being young other than tight skin and fluid joints. Other than that it kinda sucks.
From the bright and beautiful over 50 group, I say Brilliant !!
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Old 01-06-2010, 02:55 PM
 
29,988 posts, read 35,848,534 times
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By or around age 40 a bunch of physiological changes are happening to the body that tell us we are no longer "young". It is more difficult to successfully reproduce (women), hormonal changes, changes in bone structure, aging of the skin begins to become apparent, changes in vision, etc... .

No matter how young at heart or mind we are we cannot change these physiological factors.
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Old 01-06-2010, 03:00 PM
 
Location: Neither here nor there
14,810 posts, read 13,560,227 times
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You stop being "young" mid-30ish but you can remain "youthful" forever, as long as you eat nourishing food, get enough sleep, stay active, take care of your bod and keep a positive attitude. I'm 74 and have just now started having a few age-related health problems that need attention and care (like borderline hypertension). I have had the "nuisance" conditions of aging for 30 years, starting with declining eyesight in my 40's, continuing with arthritis and loss of height in my 60's.
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Old 01-06-2010, 03:16 PM
 
3,627 posts, read 12,402,826 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lifelongMOgal View Post
By or around age 40 a bunch of physiological changes are happening to the body that tell us we are no longer "young". It is more difficult to successfully reproduce (women), hormonal changes, changes in bone structure, aging of the skin begins to become apparent, changes in vision, etc... .

No matter how young at heart or mind we are we cannot change these physiological factors.
But we are constantly changing and we start much earlier than that to decline in other areas. Muscle and bone mass - what around 25-30? Thymus gland goes in our teens. Yes, some components of aging are natural and irreversible but our bodies are in a constant state of flux since the day we are born.
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Old 01-06-2010, 03:30 PM
 
Location: Indiana
324 posts, read 493,210 times
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I think the recent posts from lifelong and Cunucu are pretty realistic. We shouldn't be affraid to face it.
I'll be 56 soon, and definetely feel older than 20 years ago, not to even mention 40 years ago. Yes, body is changing. I'll get tired faster, there are some health issues, that start to let me know my age...
Also, and I don't think, I ever remember someone stating this: The older we get the more our ability to achieve the state of happiness (euphoria) is clearly diminishing. The world is simply no longer that enjoyable/exciting as it used to be.
There's a great benefit of aging - being wiser. That somewhat compensates are growing older, I would say.
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