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Old 01-04-2010, 09:18 PM
 
4,502 posts, read 11,673,260 times
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Okay, with all my blood work back and all the "issues" I now have, I've been eating less, drinking water (as opposed to my juice or soda) and have been trying to eat healthier foods. Well, today, I had a rude awakening....

I purchased some yogurts as a quick breakfast item for those mornings when I don't have time to sit down with oatmeal or farina. Okay, so I bring the yogurt to work with me and I'm eating it at my desk. I turn the container around and see that it contains..... 28 grams of sugar!!!!!

Ya think I almost fell off my seat???? That's more than a can of soda!!

When I got home, I looked at the other containers and they all contained between 25-28 grams of sugar and the 2nd ingredient on the label is (you guessed it) sugar.

Totally my fault for not reading the label while I was in the store.... I know now to be a bit more careful in my yogurt selection!
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Old 01-04-2010, 09:32 PM
 
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Yep....so true. We bought a yogurt maker from Williams-Sonoma and make our own each week. It tastes so much better. Very similar to European yogurts. We then add fresh or frozen fruit.
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Old 01-04-2010, 09:42 PM
 
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
2,903 posts, read 11,177,001 times
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The less packaged food the better.
You'll be eating better, you'll save a lot money and it's good for the environment as well ... all that paper and plastic.
And you won't need to be reading labels all the time.
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Old 01-04-2010, 09:45 PM
 
1,009 posts, read 3,549,691 times
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6oz Kroger CarbMaster yogurt
80 calories
4g carbs (3g sugars)
80mg sodium
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Old 01-04-2010, 10:06 PM
 
Location: Texas
14,078 posts, read 17,054,359 times
Reputation: 7707
Quote:
Originally Posted by coyoteskye View Post
The less packaged food the better.
You'll be eating better, you'll save a lot money and it's good for the environment as well ... all that paper and plastic.
And you won't need to be reading labels all the time.

Yes, you will....or at least should, if only to determine where your food product came from.

A good many packages don't say (Or it's hidden by saying it's "distributed" by so and so), but an astonishing amount of the food we eat is processed and packaged in some foreign country, far beyond the reach of American standards.

For instance: I visited all three local big-chain food stores the other day looking for American-grown green onions (Walmart, Albertsons, Kroger). No luck. Each one of them only offered onions grown in Mexico.

Well...an onion is an onion, right? Not necessarily. Onions are typically an irrigated crop. Irrigated with what? Water. And, what are we always told not to drink in Mexico? The water. If Mexican water is contaminated with fecal matter and chemical residue to the point that we dare not drink it when down there, what do you think their onions are immersed in?

Plus, there's the additional issue of American onion growers being cut out of the loop by big box stores because the Mexican's can sell it cheaper.

Y'all may do as you like, but in the interest of my family's safety, and American workers, I'll avoid foreign grown or foreign processed foods whenever possible.
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Old 01-04-2010, 10:12 PM
 
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
2,903 posts, read 11,177,001 times
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I buy organic and i buy local.
I may be spoiled as i'm from California but i always know where my food comes from ... real close by.
People say that they can't afford organic but speaking generally, if they simply stopped buying all the expensive packaged food, the soda, the cookies, the fast food, etc., etc., they would be able to afford organic produce and naturally raised beef, chicken, etc..
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Old 01-04-2010, 10:35 PM
 
Location: Texas
14,078 posts, read 17,054,359 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coyoteskye View Post
I buy organic and i buy local.
I may be spoiled as i'm from California but i always know where my food comes from ... real close by.
People say that they can't afford organic but speaking generally, if they simply stopped buying all the expensive packaged food, the soda, the cookies, the fast food, etc., etc., they would be able to afford organic produce and naturally raised beef, chicken, etc..

First off, not everyone is lucky enough to live in a produce growing region like California. For we "unfortunate" ones out here in the hustings, we have to rely on what the stores have to offer or we don't eat fresh vegetables, organic or not(of course, we also don't have to deal with your high taxes and tree-huggers, so that's a plus for us). Sure, if we live in the country, we could grow our own, but not everything grows everywhere. For instance, I don't think lettuce would prosper here in North Texas, so I can either buy it or do without.

Secondly, a lot of those pre-packaged and pre-cooked or processed foods are sold to people laboring under serious time contraints related to raising a family and working. It's more than a little judgmental and presumptous to presume to tell them they just have to quit buying that stuff in order to take advantage of the benefits of "healthy eating." For far too many of our neighbors, it's simply not an option.

So..it seems to me that it would be far more useful for those folks to encourage them to buy American-grown produce, which is much better for them than foreign junk simply because we have clean water here and mandated inspections, than to suggest they do what you do, which isn't possible everywhere.

Last edited by stillkit; 01-04-2010 at 10:42 PM.. Reason: Change wording.
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Old 01-04-2010, 11:34 PM
 
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
2,903 posts, read 11,177,001 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stillkit View Post
First off, not everyone is lucky enough to live in a produce growing region like California. For we "unfortunate" ones out here in the hustings, we have to rely on what the stores have to offer or we don't eat fresh vegetables, organic or not(of course, we also don't have to deal with your high taxes and tree-huggers, so that's a plus for us). Sure, if we live in the country, we could grow our own, but not everything grows everywhere. For instance, I don't think lettuce would prosper here in North Texas, so I can either buy it or do without.

Secondly, a lot of those pre-packaged and pre-cooked or processed foods are sold to people laboring under serious time contraints related to raising a family and working. It's more than a little judgmental and presumptous to presume to tell them they just have to quit buying that stuff in order to take advantage of the benefits of "healthy eating." For far too many of our neighbors, it's simply not an option.

So..it seems to me that it would be far more useful for those folks to encourage them to buy American-grown produce, which is much better for them than foreign junk simply because we have clean water here and mandated inspections, than to suggest they do what you do, which isn't possible everywhere.
Geez, i acknowledged that i may be spoiled as i'm from California and that i can easily get organic and locally grown food and you give me attitude about CA.
Why the need for that?
Why the hostility?
I've lived in a number of states and i realize that it can be a challenge to find good and affordable produce.
There was no judgment and no presumptuousness in my post (yours on the other hand .... ) but i often hear people complaining that they would like to buy organic but just can't afford it.
But they buy a tremendous amount of packaged and processed food that is very expensive and potentially dangerous to their health.
If people don't want to buy organic fine ... but if they say they can't afford it and spend a lot of money on empty calories (who the heck needs soda for example?) i dunno.
To me, the more we grow and eat organic the better ... for all concerned.
Why would anyone take issue with that?
If people made some changes, got wise about what they're eating, eliminated expensive and nutritionally worthless food from their diet (and budget!) and were able to support organic farmers, i'm fairly certain that the prices would go down (no?) and more and more people in all parts of the country would be able to eat better fruits and vegetables that aren't laden with pesticides and both humans and the land would be happier and healthier.
What's the matter with that scenario if it's an accurate one?
Does it take some effort initially and a reorganization of time and energy to change ones relationship with food and preparation, etc?
Yes.
But in the long run, it's worth it ... both financially and nutritionally.
So it seems to me that it's far more useful to encourage people to change and to realize that they are worthy of eating good and clean and healthy food and not the garbage that corporate America has been pushing down our collective throats for the last 40 - 50 years!

Last edited by coyoteskye; 01-04-2010 at 11:46 PM..
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Old 01-04-2010, 11:38 PM
 
3,627 posts, read 12,420,734 times
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My husband makes our own Greek Yogurt for the cost of skim milk. No special maker just a good pot, a thermometer, some glass jars and an insulated container.

Greek Yogurt has more beneficial bacterias than regular.

He also got some kefir grains and is making kefir and has made some yogurt based cheese very much like cream cheese but out of skim milk. He is saving the whey for me so I can make Ricotta but it looks like you need a lot of whey to make a little Ricotta so I am not so sure...........

Store bought fruit yogurt is made with fruit jam which has a lot of sugar in it. You can always get plain nonfat yogurt in the quart containers and add your own fruit but you need to add it when you are going to eat it.
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Old 01-05-2010, 07:52 AM
 
Location: A little suburb of Houston
3,702 posts, read 15,941,538 times
Reputation: 2050
Quote:
Originally Posted by stillkit View Post
First off, not everyone is lucky enough to live in a produce growing region like California. For we "unfortunate" ones out here in the hustings, we have to rely on what the stores have to offer or we don't eat fresh vegetables, organic or not(of course, we also don't have to deal with your high taxes and tree-huggers, so that's a plus for us). Sure, if we live in the country, we could grow our own, but not everything grows everywhere. For instance, I don't think lettuce would prosper here in North Texas, so I can either buy it or do without.

Secondly, a lot of those pre-packaged and pre-cooked or processed foods are sold to people laboring under serious time contraints related to raising a family and working. It's more than a little judgmental and presumptous to presume to tell them they just have to quit buying that stuff in order to take advantage of the benefits of "healthy eating." For far too many of our neighbors, it's simply not an option.

So..it seems to me that it would be far more useful for those folks to encourage them to buy American-grown produce, which is much better for them than foreign junk simply because we have clean water here and mandated inspections, than to suggest they do what you do, which isn't possible everywhere.
Actually, lettuce, spinach and others do quite well in North Texas during the proper season but certainly not year round. I used to have a magnificent 2 acre garden in, NE TX. I sure do miss it and being able to pluck my lunch or sides right out of the ground. My neighbors were Mormon and taught me and my mom ever so many canning and preserving techniques. Their garden was even better than ours. I can only grow leaf lettuce and a few other greens as well as tomatoes and peppers in my raised garden here in the city.
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