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Old 08-12-2010, 08:07 AM
 
2,377 posts, read 3,505,641 times
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Just read this article about tese stones found in Viking graves:"Thor's Hammer" Found in Viking Graves
And another one to off-set some of the recent posts on how evil the Vikings were
Vikings' Barbaric Bad Rap Beginning to Fade
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Old 08-12-2010, 08:58 AM
 
Location: Parts Unknown, Northern California
11,234 posts, read 7,313,552 times
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The headline "Thor's Hammer Found" isn't merely misleading, it is an unambiguous lie. The article says they found:
Quote:
fist-size stone tools resembling the Norse god Thor's hammerhead—were actually purposely placed as good-luck talismans, archaeologists say.
Something which has never existed, cannot be found. We aren't going to be coming across Paul Bunyan's axe nor Don Quixote's lance nor the Anvil of Krom.
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Old 08-12-2010, 01:02 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque
7,080 posts, read 7,261,792 times
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A 'Thor's Hammer' is a common name for a religious talisman shaped to resemble a hammer, specifically Mjolnir, the mythological hammer carried by Thor.

To suppose that the headline was implying that the actual hammer of Thor was found is laughable.
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Old 08-12-2010, 01:47 PM
 
Location: Parts Unknown, Northern California
11,234 posts, read 7,313,552 times
Reputation: 8477
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
A 'Thor's Hammer' is a common name for a religious talisman shaped to resemble a hammer, specifically Mjolnir, the mythological hammer carried by Thor.

To suppose that the headline was implying that the actual hammer of Thor was found is laughable.
It is laughable because the above is supposedly such common knowledge?

In any event, the proper headline would have been "Replica of Thor's Hammer Found", or "Thor's Hammer Pendant Found" Even the employment of the indefinite article, such as you used "A Thor's Hammer Found" would have been acceptable. But the headline made no such discrimination, did it? It said that Thor's Hammer had been found.

I looked up Thor's Hammer online and cannot find any references where the distinction between The Hammer and the artifacts you reference isn't being made, this appears to be unique to you.
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Old 08-12-2010, 03:08 PM
 
1,016 posts, read 2,021,708 times
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Actually, since it keeps "Thor's Hammer", it implies more of a naming convention than a striking device owned by somebody named Thor. But, I guess if it bothers you so much you can write to National Geographic's customer service here: ngsline@customersvc.com
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Old 08-12-2010, 05:59 PM
 
Location: Parts Unknown, Northern California
11,234 posts, read 7,313,552 times
Reputation: 8477
Appreciate it.

I got my reply already, they sided with me.
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Old 08-12-2010, 06:57 PM
 
1,016 posts, read 2,021,708 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grandstander View Post
Appreciate it.

I got my reply already, they sided with me.
Excellent. Time for a celebratory beer.

Now, regarding the actual content of the first article (which I admittedly skimmed), it seems that they may be making a bit of a jump in ascribing a certain significance to a "lucky charm". Thor's Hammer amulets have been found throughout Scandinavia, none of which remotely resemble a stone-headed hammer. Aside from saga descriptions of the item, the previously found amulets are the only artifacts that give an impression of what Thor's hammer was believed by people of the time to look like. To take what resembles a miniature stone age hammer head and ascribe it the significance of Thor-worship without any other archaeological or documentary evidence pointing in that direction is to take quite a leap.
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Old 08-31-2010, 07:28 PM
 
Location: South of Maine
739 posts, read 436,101 times
Reputation: 799
If Thor was careless with his hammer, he would end up with a thor thumb!!
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Old 08-31-2010, 07:45 PM
 
Location: Peoples Republic of Cali
9,595 posts, read 4,865,820 times
Reputation: 5400
NO NO NO They found the Real Thor's Hammer at the bottom of that big crater in Arizona, I saw it on the last Iron Man Movie
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Old 09-04-2010, 09:11 AM
 
Location: South of Maine
739 posts, read 436,101 times
Reputation: 799
You don't want to take a hit in the Thor-ax with a Thor hammer!
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