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Old 11-18-2010, 07:53 PM
 
33 posts, read 111,048 times
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Is there anyone old enough to remember colored bathrooms? What was it like? I would probably feel bad today telling a black person to only use a certain bathroom. What did blacks do and say when they were told to use the "colored" bathroom? Describe the typical demeanor at that time?
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Old 11-18-2010, 07:56 PM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Awesome50 View Post
I would probably feel bad today telling a black person to only use a certain bathroom.
Probably?
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Old 11-18-2010, 08:00 PM
 
33 posts, read 111,048 times
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What I mean by that is if it was still like that today in society, I don't think I could just get into it.
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Old 11-18-2010, 08:18 PM
 
Location: Parts Unknown, Northern California
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I grew up in the South and recall the three sexes..men, women and "colored." I was too little at the time to do anything but take it for granted and I never had a conversation with anyone about it, I just accepted it the same way I accepted all the other signs of "negroes" being in some sort of inferior position.

Before I reached the age of reason and became a radical smartass about such matters, I took my cues from my family. My father was from Missouri, and although a fairly enlightened man otherwise, his attitude toward race was typical of his upbringing. He referenced blacks as "shines or "spearchuckers." My mother wasn't the sort to ever express any opinion of her own, possibly because she never had any, but her attitude could be summed as "I think negores are just fine, they make wonderful waiters and maids." Her mother was the worst, still stuck in a non reconstructed southern mentality. I recall one Thanksgiving at Grandma's where we all enjoyed a great meal, prepared and served by Bertha, my grandmother's maid. Years later I had cause to think about how in all probability, Bertha would much rather have spent her Thanksgiving having a meal with her family, but back then I took it all for granted that things were as they should be. That particular Thanksgiving, after we had polished off the turkey and Bertha was cleaning up, my grandmother decided to make a speech in praise of Bertha. She cited Bertha's willingness to always be available, her never shirking hard work, her cooking skills, her loyalty....and the last line of her oration has stuck with me forever. My grandmother suddenly lowered her voice to a conspiratorial tone, leaned forward and told us..."and best of all....she knows her place." Even as an eight year old that struck me as wrong.

The question..what did blacks say when told to use the "colored" bathroom wasn't one that ever came up. They just did it and I just took it for granted that they had no problem with it. I never witnessed any sort of associated controversy. I do not recall the specifics of those things vanishing, but of course they eventually did during the '60's.
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Old 11-18-2010, 08:32 PM
 
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I remember it well.... drinking fountains too.

It was and will always be called stupidity. It appears to be making a comeback.
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Old 11-18-2010, 08:33 PM
 
33 posts, read 111,048 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grandstander View Post
I grew up in the South and recall the three sexes..men, women and "colored." I was too little at the time to do anything but take it for granted and I never had a conversation with anyone about it, I just accepted it the same way I accepted all the other signs of "negroes" being in some sort of inferior position.

Before I reached the age of reason and became a radical smartass about such matters, I took my cues from my family. My father was from Missouri, and although a fairly enlightened man otherwise, his attitude toward race was typical of his upbringing. He referenced blacks as "shines or "spearchuckers." My mother wasn't the sort to ever express any opinion of her own, possibly because she never had any, but her attitude could be summed as "I think negores are just fine, they make wonderful waiters and maids." Her mother was the worst, still stuck in a non reconstructed southern mentality. I recall one Thanksgiving at Grandma's where we all enjoyed a great meal, prepared and served by Bertha, my grandmother's maid. Years later I had cause to think about how in all probability, Bertha would much rather have spent her Thanksgiving having a meal with her family, but back then I took it all for granted that things were as they should be. That particular Thanksgiving, after we had polished off the turkey and Bertha was cleaning up, my grandmother decided to make a speech in praise of Bertha. She cited Bertha's willingness to always be available, her never shirking hard work, her cooking skills, her loyalty....and the last line of her oration has stuck with me forever. My grandmother suddenly lowered her voice to a conspiratorial tone, leaned forward and told us..."and best of all....she knows her place." Even as an eight year old that struck me as wrong.

The question..what did blacks say when told to use the "colored" bathroom wasn't one that ever came up. They just did it and I just took it for granted that they had no problem with it. I never witnessed any sort of associated controversy. I do not recall the specifics of those things vanishing, but of course they eventually did during the '60's.
Very interesting story. This kind of story really got my imagination going. You are a good writer.
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Old 11-18-2010, 08:56 PM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
26,346 posts, read 82,968,211 times
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Finish this children's little song:

Eeny, meeny, miny, moe, Catch A .....

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eeny,_meeny,_miny,_moe
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Old 11-18-2010, 09:21 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,726,438 times
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Default You don't have to be ancient to remember this.

I am 66 years old. Every summer my parents and we two children drove from St. Louis, Missouri, where we lived, to southern Louisiana, where my parents had grown up, to visit their parents (my grandparents). In St. Louis there were no "white" and "colored" drinking fountain signs nor the tri-gender "men", "women", and "colored" restroom signs, but I can remember them clearly at gas stations along the route once we got south far enough to be out of Missouri. Nobody needed to be "told" what restroom or drinking fountain to use; the signs were there for that purpose and people knew that enormous trouble was the price for bucking the system.

A related sight, which also pretty much disappeared by the time I was a pre-teen, was the tin-roofed, unpainted wooden shacks which served as housing for the blacks who tilled the cotton fields in Arkansas and Mississippi. We could see them in large groups in the fields with their hoes, and the bleak little houses were often right along the highway. (Remember, there were no interstates at that time).

Although these are childhood memories from the early 1950's, they remain very vivid to me for some reason.
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Old 11-19-2010, 07:35 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
10,238 posts, read 18,742,495 times
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When I opened on the thread I thought you meant this kind of thing.

Save The Pink Bathroom
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Old 11-19-2010, 07:42 AM
 
3,111 posts, read 7,015,115 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Irishtom29 View Post
When I opened on the thread I thought you meant this kind of thing.

Save The Pink Bathroom

Me too. My parents still have the pink bathroom.
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