U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > History
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-23-2011, 03:43 PM
 
Location: Parts Unknown, Northern California
40,834 posts, read 18,553,245 times
Reputation: 18653

Advertisements

January 23, 1861:

150 years ago today police in New York City confiscated 38 cases of muskets which had been stored aboard a steamer bound for Alabama.

The US Senate devoted the day to debating whether or not to try and replace the departed senators from the secessionist States, and how to do so if they did so. No resolution was reached.


And....Robert E. Lee composed and sent a letter to his son, in which he lays out the view that secession is illegal.
Quote:
I can anticipate no greater calamity for the country than a dissolution of the Union. It would be an accumulation of all the evils we complain of, and I am willing to sacrifice everything but honor for its preservation. I hope, therefore, that all constitutional means will be exhausted before there is a resort to force. Secession is nothing but revolution. The framers of our Constitution never exhausted so much labor, wisdom, and forbearance in its formation, and surrounded it with so many guards and securities, if it was intended to be broken by every member of the Confederacy at will. It was intended for “perpetual union,” so expressed in the preamble, and for the establishment of a government, not a compact, which can only be dissolved by revolution or the consent of all the people in convention assembled
http://publicroad.wikispaces.com/Lee...ter+to+His+Son

I find the Lee letter fascinating in light of his later decision to support his home State over the Federal Union. Lee wrote
Quote:
"I can anticipate no greater calamity for the country than a dissolution of the Union."
Lee loathed slavery, was the most respected soldier in the US army, was offered the highest command available in that army, did not believe that his State had a right to secede, and could think of no greater disaster to befall the nation than Civil War.

And despite all this, he still elected to serve the Confederate cause. He placed home and family ahead of all of his other beliefs in doing so.

Why?

The last part of the letter explains:
Quote:
Still, a Union that can only be maintained by swords and bayonets, and in which strife and civil war are to take the place of brotherly love and kindness, has no charm for me. I shall mourn for my country and for the welfare and progress of mankind. If the Union is dissolved, and the government disrupted, I shall return to my native state and share the miseries of my people; and, save in defense, will draw my sword on none.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-24-2011, 08:51 AM
 
Location: Parts Unknown, Northern California
40,834 posts, read 18,553,245 times
Reputation: 18653
January 24th, 1861:

One of the key North/South disputes leading to the war was the serial controversy over the Fugitive Slave Act which had been part of the Compromise of 1850. Northerners had refused to cooperate in returning fugitive slaves, abolitionist groups had actively provided refuge for them, and northern juries would not convict those charged with harboring fugitive slaves.

150 years ago today, the law was enforced for the last time in history. Lucy, a runaway from Wheeling, Virginia, was captured in Cleveland, Ohio and returned under the Fugitive Slave law.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-24-2011, 06:56 PM
 
Location: Parts Unknown, Northern California
40,834 posts, read 18,553,245 times
Reputation: 18653
January 25, 1861:

With a meeting to discuss a proposed confederation set for Febuary 4th in Montgomery, the Georgia legislature resolved to have its delegates to that convention propose the following:
Quote:
Resolved, That in the opinion of this Convention no State ought to be admitted into the new confederacy to be formed at Montgomery, unless such State shall tolerate the existence of slavery as one of its own domestic institutions, and shall permit an inter-state traffic in slaves with its citizens, and that should any State at any time abolish the institution within its limits, such State shall ipso facto cease to be a member of the said Confederacy."
Just one more thing to keep in mind whenever you have the urge to try and argue that slavery wasn't behind the war.

Of course one may wonder which states which did not have slavery, the Georgians thought would be attempting to join this confederation.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-26-2011, 08:27 AM
 
Location: Parts Unknown, Northern California
40,834 posts, read 18,553,245 times
Reputation: 18653
January 26, 1861:

150 years ago today, Louisiana joined South Carolina, Florida, Alabama, Georgia and Mississippi in secession proclamations.

And then there were six.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-26-2011, 08:34 AM
 
20,976 posts, read 16,256,431 times
Reputation: 10270
I just wanted to say what a great thread this is!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-26-2011, 10:27 AM
 
31,385 posts, read 32,081,824 times
Reputation: 14896
Quote:
Originally Posted by alphamale View Post
I just wanted to say what a great thread this is!
Only due to Grandstander's due diligence when it comes to maintaining it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-26-2011, 10:35 AM
 
31,385 posts, read 32,081,824 times
Reputation: 14896
Major Robert Anderson withdraws from Fort Moultrie to Fort Sumter with ten officers, seventy-six enlisted men, forty-five women and children and fifty-five laborers.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-26-2011, 02:00 PM
 
5,116 posts, read 4,622,359 times
Reputation: 4375
Quote:
Originally Posted by alphamale View Post
I just wanted to say what a great thread this is!
Seconded!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-26-2011, 05:41 PM
 
Location: Parts Unknown, Northern California
40,834 posts, read 18,553,245 times
Reputation: 18653
January 27, 1861:

When looking back upon what passed for proper morality in the past, we tend to feel superior in that we have vanquished formerly tolerated institutions such as human sacrifice, cruel and unusual corporal punishments, child labor...and slavery. A humbling perspective is to consider that there will be future generations which have vanquished practices we now treat as morally acceptable, and we do not know which ones they will be because of exactly that...now they are morally acceptable.

Thus, when trying to comprehend how a majority of Americans could have no problem with the institution of race based slavery, we might kindly conclude that most of them were simply victims of familiarity. It was there, it had been there for a long time, it was how things were done...it must be alright.

The morality of slavery was marketed to Southerners as part of the moral stream directed at them from their pulpits. All Southern Christian sects supported slavery. An example of how it was rationalized may be found in this sermon, delivered 150 tears ago today, by Ebenezer W. Warren, pastor of the First Baptist Church of Macon, Georgia.

Quote:
“Slavery forms a vital element of the Divine Revelation to man. It’s institution, regulation, and perpetuity, constitute a part of many of the books of the Bible …. The public mind needs enlightening from the sacred teachings of inspiration on this subject.......................................

............Because Slavery is right; and because the condition of the slaves affords them all those privileges which would prove substantial blessings to them; and, too, because their Maker has decreed their bondage, and has given them, as a race, capacities and aspirations suited alone to this condition of life ….”
One Eternal Day: Baptists, slavery, and the Civil War
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-27-2011, 06:13 PM
 
Location: Parts Unknown, Northern California
40,834 posts, read 18,553,245 times
Reputation: 18653
January 28, 1861:

150 years ago today the Union gained a State, Kansas was admitted as the 34th State. Kansas actually became the 28th State, if you only count those States which still considered themselves part of the nation.

On the same day, the Union began to lose another State, the Secession Convention convened in Austin, Texas with 177 delegates, 166 of whom would vote for secession four days later.

In contrast to the domestic revolution in support of slavery, on this same day, half way around the world, Czar Alexander convened his State Council and announced to them his plans to issue a Proclamation of Emancipation for Russia's serfs. Serfdom was distinguished from western slavery and the short description is that feudalism had failed to end in Russia as it had everywhere else. The peasants legally belonged to the manors and estates where they had been born and were obligated to spend thier lives laboring. Unlike western slavery, the estate owners did have legal duties toward their serfs, they had to provide them with military protection, as well as leasing to the serf, a plot of land for the serf to farm for himself and his family. A few high energy, enterprising serfs were able to work in the manor fields all day, and still have enough get up and go to turn a profit from their leased plot. A serf who saved up enough money this way, could purchase his freedom.

The above description described nearly all European arrangements in the Middle Ages, but existed still in only Russia by the 19th Century.


The Emancipation was issued on February 19th, but was structured in such a way as to provide gradual liberation. The last of the serfs would not be free until 1881.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > History
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top