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Old 01-24-2015, 10:24 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by belmont22 View Post
So people in 2013 still look like this, huh?



I do sort of half agree in the sense that people still love the 90s and don't consider it old or dated, but I think it's more because the 90s wasn't nearly as outrageous as the 70s and 80s. And certain 90s attitudes and fads have persisted into the present, such as neoliberalism/globalization and sagging your pants. But then again the materialism of the 80s is still with us, and the legacy of the 60s is still fresh in many ways. There are still hippies and Beatles fans.

But I think even 1999 has a pretty different vibe from today, you'd kind of have to be blind or not paying attention to notice. I was watching Analyze This the other day and it looked like it could have been from the 80s. Tons of people with thick rimmed glasses, kids wearing really colorful clothes, nobody texting on their phones.
Yes, I'd say for the most part casual wear for semi-successful whites in their late 20s-30s is similar to what you'd see on Friends in the late 90s.

 
Old 01-26-2015, 09:23 AM
 
Location: Chicago - Logan Square
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I agree with most of the posts here, and things were definitely different by '92-93.

The 80's themselves were a bit broken up. The height of what people think of as the 80's was '84-88. Reagan was very popular, and it felt like the economy was getting better all the time. MTV was huge at that point, and had a massive impact on popular music. Some really crappy songs became hits just because the video was interesting. John Hughes was the director of the 80's, and '84-87 saw the release of his defining movies - Breakfast Club, Sixteen Candles, Pretty in Pink, and Ferris Bueller's Day Off. Those movies really defined a lot of the styles and music that people identify as being "The 80's".

1987-88 saw a lot of that just getting tired. The stock market crash and Iran-Contra burst the confidence bubble of a lot of people, the MTV/Chess King fashions started to seem ridiculous, and Michael Jackson started looking like a complete freak show. 1989-92 was the transition to a solid 90's identity, starting with the fall of the Berlin Wall and ending with the dissolution of the USSR.
 
Old 01-26-2015, 01:08 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Attrill View Post
I agree with most of the posts here, and things were definitely different by '92-93.

1989-92 was the transition to a solid 90's identity, starting with the fall of the Berlin Wall and ending with the dissolution of the USSR.
This is a very difficult period to describe. The HW Bush era (1989-1993) definitely had an identity like the Reagan 80s and Nixon 70s. 1989 was the year responsible for setting up the whole early 90s period. This would be the time we made Nintendo Power Glove references in movies, wore Bo Knows shirts and made Dan Quayle jokes every week. Who can forget all of the 80s sitcoms that canned back then?

It's seems like once the American public was getting ready to vote for Bill Clinton, everything changed. 1989 fits in more with the 80s because Bush still had a high approval rating. As the early 90s went on, we liked him less and less. So, the early 90s were geared towards getting to 1993. I would still say 1993 was the first true year of the 90s. 1992 did not have every pop cultural figure of the Clinton years in it like '93 did.
 
Old 01-26-2015, 01:31 PM
 
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1986 is when the 80s began looking more like the 90s. Janet Jackson was going down the same route as her brother. The Real Ghostbusters were teaching children the value of teamwork, something you wouldn't find in He-Man and The Masters of the Universe. Entertech water guns and Laser Tag were sharing shelf space with Transformers and Thundercats. Kyle MacLachlan was the star in that David Lynch movie, Blue Velvet. We were seeing sequels to hit 80s movies in video stores and movie theaters. The coolest guys in School wore Jordans. Salt N Pepa came on to the scene. John Hughes had a movie title that doubled as a person's name (Curly Sue was released in 1991).

The late 80s still had a little bit of 80s spirit in them. After all, John Hughes was still revolutionizing the teen film genre. Most cartoons on TV were 30 minute toy commercials. 70s musicians were putting out hits.
 
Old 01-26-2015, 08:10 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rocknrooler View Post

In short, the 60s, 1961-1970, all the way up to the beginning of the 1990s (starting in 1991-1993) were dominated by anti-Authoritarian Rock n Roll culture, while the 1990s (1991-2000) marked the beginning of Rap, with Grunge being the only Rock contender to suppress Hip-Hop to 2nd place until it died in the late 1990s (1998-2000), in which pop and Rap dominated, with a pathetic attempt by "NuMetal" to dethrone both of these groups.
NuMetal was just another made up internet term to cover about 300 different groups from that era. NuMetal was just the natural evolution of grunge and alternative music. Grunge and alternative wasn't heavy enough for some people, or too slow paced, and they wanted to put a different spin on it. Just not the point where it would be considered thrash metal or something similar. It was the middle ground so some people didn't like it because they saw it as either too heavy, or not heavy enough...and the people stuck in the 80's or earlier just plain didn't get it.
 
Old 01-27-2015, 09:53 AM
 
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I'll put it like this, if the early 90s were a book, 1989 would be the hardcover. It's safe to judge a book by its cover in this instance.
 
Old 02-03-2015, 10:44 PM
 
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Interesting thread !!!

One thing that did change in late 80's and early 90's was the state of radio both AM and FM.

In the early 80's one could still hear music on those 50,000 watt monster AM stations like NYC's WABC & WNBC, Buffalo's WKBW, Boston's WRKO, Chicago's WLS and even Cincinatti's 700 WLW still played music. However one by one during the 80's they would change formats and by 1989 when WLS became news/talk it was an end to a great era. Talk, news and sports were big on AM by 1990 and the rise of Rush Limbaugh and other talk shows and CNN offering an audio feed of their Headline News 24/7 made it so much easier for those stations to remain on the air.

FM radio in the late 80's Top 40 radio was BIG..very BIG as many cities had multiple stations sporting that format, In the DC/Baltimore region alone in 1987 there were EIGHT FM stations doing top 40. Unfortunately by 1993 not one of those stations were doing top 40 as they had switched one by one to other formats like classic rock, hot adult contemporary, oldies and in WAVA's case..religious. Disc jockies were the big thing in the 80's but by 1992 it was more/less "..shut up and just play the music" as I learned very quickly. I started in radio in 1990 and our station at the time really didn't care how much the dj would talk on the air however by 1992 policy was only to talk three times an hour.

Oh yes country music....in the late 80's the format in a lot of places was more/less dead but Garth Brooks would change all that in the early 90's.

Last edited by tantan1968; 02-03-2015 at 11:02 PM..
 
Old 02-05-2015, 04:22 PM
 
66 posts, read 75,562 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by belmont22 View Post
Asking People older than 30.

I was born in '90 and I was wondering, was the atmosphere, culture, and way people acted in 1990, 1991, and 1992 more or less identical to how people acted in the mid and late 80s, or was it suddenly different as soon the 90s hit?

I don't see a huge difference between 2006 and 2012 aside from social media being bigger, more dance music and less rap, were 1986 and 1992 any more different or about the same difference?


The late 80s paved way to the early nineties. People didn't suddenly change their hair styles and cultural attitudes as soon as the clock hit midnight January 1st 1990. If you ask me though, the music from the late 80s was quite different from the early 90s

Late 80s: Boy bands were huge at the time like New Kids on the Block and New Edition. Pop music had that synthesizer effect thanks to artists like Paula Abdul, Taylor Dayne, and Kylie Minogue. New Wave was still a thing with Roxette and T-Pau. And hip hop was emerging into the mainstream.

Early 90s: Music from the Seattle grunge scene was quickly replacing arena/metal bands. 1991 and 1992 brought us Nirvana, Alice In Chains, and Pearl Jam. Singers with big voices were also huge around that time. Think Mariah Carey, Whitney Houston, and Celine Dion. Gangsta rap was also quickly emerging during this period.

The changes didn't stop at music, though! The preppy fashions and big hair styles from the 80s quickly diminished with a more laid-back style laced with grunge effects. People were still Republican when 1989 ended but soon voted Democrat in 92. This ushered in two terms of Bill Clinton.

I could go......but I won't
 
Old 02-09-2015, 06:21 PM
 
126 posts, read 375,213 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeniusGirl800 View Post
The late 80s paved way to the early nineties. People didn't suddenly change their hair styles and cultural attitudes as soon as the clock hit midnight January 1st 1990. If you ask me though, the music from the late 80s was quite different from the early 90s

Late 80s: Boy bands were huge at the time like New Kids on the Block and New Edition. Pop music had that synthesizer effect thanks to artists like Paula Abdul, Taylor Dayne, and Kylie Minogue. New Wave was still a thing with Roxette and T-Pau. And hip hop was emerging into the mainstream.

Early 90s: Music from the Seattle grunge scene was quickly replacing arena/metal bands. 1991 and 1992 brought us Nirvana, Alice In Chains, and Pearl Jam. Singers with big voices were also huge around that time. Think Mariah Carey, Whitney Houston, and Celine Dion. Gangsta rap was also quickly emerging during this period.

The changes didn't stop at music, though! The preppy fashions and big hair styles from the 80s quickly diminished with a more laid-back style laced with grunge effects. People were still Republican when 1989 ended but soon voted Democrat in 92. This ushered in two terms of Bill Clinton.

I could go......but I won't
There was more to the early 90s music scene than Grunge, Gangsta and soulful singers with big voices. The New Kids were still charting in '90. You have to remember most teens were wearing Hypercolor and umbros in 1991, the Grunge phase wouldn't start until the fall of '92.
 
Old 02-09-2015, 10:13 PM
 
722 posts, read 835,160 times
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it was all the same if you were not a kid anymore, it only seems different if you were growing up during those years because of trends & fads, fashions , etc

once you get past the stages of growing up, you dont really notice any big changes
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