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Old 11-17-2012, 08:17 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by belmont22 View Post
Can you explain why in more detail? I'm curious. To me, 2008 and 2012 don't seem all that different. Was 1988 and 1992 a greater contrast in comparison?

Music wise Nirvana and grunge and the Seattle music science were a hit out of left field.

Totally unexpected and very much unlike the previous music. Rap existed since the 80ies(and even the 70ies) but gains more traction outside of the African American communality in the 90ies. In terms of dance music early to mid 90ies it was House music latter to give way to hip hop.

Technology wise by 1992 the CD had become dominate form on which music was recorded(and by the late 90ies the MP3 was causing CD sales to decline) and the casette tape days were limited(if not over). It exsisted in the 80ies but by the 90ies they were much cheaper and more common.

 
Old 11-18-2012, 01:15 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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For reference, I graduated High School in Spring of 1990, and started University in the Fall of 1990.

In my opinion, the early 90s started in 88 or 89. There was plenty of leftover stuff, though after all, the originators of 90s pop culture, by and large, spent much of their youth in the 80s.

Grunge and Gangsta rap (or perhaps more properly, the growing influence of West Coast rap) started before 1990. By 1990, neon colors and Wayfarers were already considered "too 80s".

So, in short, No. Even the (very) late 80s were progressing, in terms of popular style into what became the 90s style.
 
Old 11-19-2012, 03:39 PM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
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Although the 1990s were different, there was no sudden change. Changes were gradual. Thus 1988 was more like 1993 than it was like 1981. It was not like we all woke up one day and suddenly discovered the world was completely different. Frankly year to year, you really did not notice the changes, but if you looked back five years at any time, changes were evident. Big hair did not just vanish, it faded. Grunge did not suddenly appear out of no where, it started out at the fringe and became mainstream, just like punk/new wave before it. There was no sudden change where something that did not exist was instantly popular the next day or even the next year. Things popped up, you heard about them then heard more and more and they grew and became more popular. Technology was the same way. Cell phones did not just pop into existence. First we had car phones, then bag phones that brick phones then flip phones, then cell phones got really little and grew big again. Internet, same way, you hear about it but it was not really useful. Then it became something you poked around with for fun. Then it became more and more useful. Computers (started in the 1970s) existed, then they were a novelty, then a useful tool and eventually critical. Everything was incremental
 
Old 11-19-2012, 04:12 PM
 
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I didn't see much of a difference between the 80s and early 90s but then again I was pretty young.
 
Old 11-19-2012, 04:49 PM
 
Location: North Dakota
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It seems to me that the time period from 1989 early 1992 was a transition period between the 80s and 90s and not really a part of either decade. For example, in the fall of 1991 Genesis released their We Can't Dance Album and this was the same time Nirvana released their Nevermind album. Genesis was definitely an 80s band and many people credit Nirvana with starting up the alternative rock of the 90s. Hair Metal was also still around although it was in a decline by this point. TV shows like Cheers and The Cosby Show were still around although 90s shows like The Simpsons, Seinfeld, and Home Improvement had debuted by this time. As far as kids' shows (I'm 31 so barely over the age limit the OP mentioned) the Disney Afternoon was still on and that began in the late 80s. Saturday morning cartoons were also still big at this time and as I understand those declined in the 90s after Cartoon Networked debuted. (Although considering I wasn't watching cartoons after about 1992 I don't know what was on.) If you look politically this was during the presidency of George Bush who was conservative like his predecessor Ronald Reagan. By 1992 Bill Clinton came into office so that changed the politics in the US.
 
Old 11-20-2012, 06:54 AM
 
Location: Terramaria
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I agree that the early '90s were a progression away from "80s culture" (especially the 1986-88 portion of it) that gradually faded more and more, so that by mid-1993, the '90s were distinctive from '80s culture. Communism died in Eastern Europe, Microsoft replaced IBM and Apple as the PC and Software leader with their Windows 3.x, TVs became black and had menu features as opposed to the '80s grey/brown ones, increasing as time passed. Its no different in that each era appearance, spreads, hits peak popularity, fades, and then becomes history. I also recall political correctness as we know it becoming mainstream in the early '90s, which hasn't let up since. Most of the stuff that people thought it was still "80s" were watching reruns of '80s material, playing old games from the '80s, or watching VHS titles that were from the '80s.
 
Old 11-20-2012, 08:24 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Borntoolate85 View Post
I agree that the early '90s were a progression away from "80s culture" (especially the 1986-88 portion of it) that gradually faded more and more, so that by mid-1993, the '90s were distinctive from '80s culture. Communism died in Eastern Europe, Microsoft replaced IBM and Apple as the PC and Software leader with their Windows 3.x, TVs became black and had menu features as opposed to the '80s grey/brown ones, increasing as time passed. Its no different in that each era appearance, spreads, hits peak popularity, fades, and then becomes history. I also recall political correctness as we know it becoming mainstream in the early '90s, which hasn't let up since. Most of the stuff that people thought it was still "80s" were watching reruns of '80s material, playing old games from the '80s, or watching VHS titles that were from the '80s.
I don't completely agree. There's plenty of stuff that was actually produced in the early 90s that still has the 80s style written all over it. Especially in 1990-91. I think the first Home Alone seems like an 80s movie, even as a kid in 1997 I remember thinking it looked kind of old.
 
Old 11-20-2012, 10:16 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by belmont22 View Post
I don't completely agree. There's plenty of stuff that was actually produced in the early 90s that still has the 80s style written all over it. Especially in 1990-91. I think the first Home Alone seems like an 80s movie, even as a kid in 1997 I remember thinking it looked kind of old.
Any movie more than about 5 years old will look old, esp. to a kid. Fashions and trends rarely last that long. The style of Home Alone seems 80ies because it was written by John Huges who also wrote 80ies classics such as Ferris Bullers day off and The Breakfast club. However it is more 90ies like than 80ies. If you want 80ies kind of kids film try Adventures in Baby Sitting, ET, The Goonies, Flight of the Navigator thoose flims reek the 80ies in terms of cloths and most of them were done circa 1985/1986/1987(ET being the exception I think).

Anyway the big tip off that it is a 90ies film is in the clothing and hair styles. Kids clothing is also very tied to a time period. The stuff Macauly Culkin has on would look a little out of place say in 1985 as well as his hair do.

Last edited by chirack; 11-20-2012 at 10:41 AM..
 
Old 11-20-2012, 10:41 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
Any movie more than about 5 years old will look old, esp. to a kid. Fashions and trends rarely last that long. The style of Home Alone seems 80ies because it was written by John Huges who also wrote 80ies classics such as Ferris Bullers day off and The Breakfast club. However it is more 90ies like than 80ies. If you want 80ies kind of kids film try Adventures in Baby Sitting, ET, The Goonies, Flight of the Navigator thoose flims reek the 80ies in terms of cloths and most of them were done circa 1986/1987(ET being the exception I think).
Um, not really. I highly doubt any kid today would find a movie from 2006 that old looking. Kids don't even consider the 90s that old. The difference between 1990 and 1996/97 is much more significant than the difference between the mid 00s and today.

I think it's because styles changed so rapidly in the 80s and 90s, compared to since 2000 which changes pretty glacially. Unless I payed attention to the technological gadgets people were using the past 7 years or so all looks more or less exactly the same. The early 00s is actually starting to look a little bit older though, some of those Bush-era documentaries definitely seem like period pieces now for instance.

As to Home Alone. Home Alone is definitely a bit of a different feeling from a 1985 movie but I think it's equally if not more different from a grungy mid 90s film like Jerry MaGuire. It definitely has a classic feel common to 80s films that late 90s and 2000s films lack, at least IMO. Especially the first one from 1990. I think you could easily put it alongside Adventures in Babysitting, ET and Honey I Shrunk the Kids and it wouldn't stick out as being too modern to be put amongst them.
 
Old 11-21-2012, 01:56 PM
 
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1968-1973
1974-1980
1981-1990
1991-2001
2001-2008
2009 >

that's how I break it up with turning points.
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