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Old 11-27-2012, 06:49 PM
 
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As far as the Nirvana/Pearl Jam thing, I have a pet theory that the explosion of Thrash Metal's popularity in the late 80's and early 90's was the real initial indicator that American audiences were ready for something grittier than the hair rock which had become extremely formulaic by that point. Once it had been streamlined and made somewhat more consumer-friendly (Enter Sandman) it sold like hotcakes. Another thing to bear in mind is that the somewhat drastic change in popular tastes from bright-and-shiny 80's-ness to the "grittier" 90s follows the early 90s recession and Gulf War pretty closely.

 
Old 11-27-2012, 07:31 PM
 
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In terms of clothing styles, the early 80's seemed to be closer to the late 70's with lots of browns, oranges, and harvest gold. The mid to late 80's, the styles seemed to shift to pastel colors. Men's hair in the 80's was significantly poofier and longer around the edges. It was common for a guy's hair to go over the ears and have long sideburns. By the late 80's, it seems that men's hair styles changed to a more conservative, clean-cut look using a razor blade to trim around the ears. Women's hair went from wavy to poofy by the late 80s' and early 90's. Neon colors became popular in the early 90's briefly, but that faded by about '92. One key difference between pre-1992 and post-1992 is that men and boys wore daisy duke shorts pre-1992 and post-1992 shorts became much longer and clothing became baggier in general.

By the mid-90's, most men wore their hair significantly shorter and seeing men with shaved heads became common. Women stopped wearing their hair poofy and got rid of bangs. The typical hair style for younger women and girls was straight, long hair and put in a scrunchy, or just wear down. The 90's colors and clothing styles seemed to take shape around '92. Darker colors became fashionable as opposed to bright pastels or neons. Grays, whites, blacks, and blues became popular. I think another major 90's style shift was people started wearing clothing with logos and advertisements more often, especially children. Kids in school wore band t-shirts with Nirvana, Pearl Jam, Soundgarten, etc. Young buys began wearing much looser clothing. Large t-shirts, baggy pants, longer shorts that went below the knees.

In the 2000's, I feel that clothing styles have changed quite a bit from the 90's. Baggy pants have gone away. Clothing with huge logos or advertisements is no longer in style. Clothing has gotten much tighter and an emphasis has been put on fitted clothing that is custom fit to your body build. Bright colors are coming back into style and neons can be seen on occasion.
 
Old 11-27-2012, 07:43 PM
 
26,163 posts, read 14,457,966 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SD4020
Culturally and as a dynamic of the decade I point to 1992 as the year it all changed.
Indeed it was!!

Thats the year sesame street changed and became COMPLETE CRAP!

Old School ‘Sesame Street’ vs. New School ‘Sesame Street’ Balancing Motherhood
 
Old 11-27-2012, 11:08 PM
 
2,096 posts, read 3,652,389 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TravisW View Post
As far as the Nirvana/Pearl Jam thing, I have a pet theory that the explosion of Thrash Metal's popularity in the late 80's and early 90's was the real initial indicator that American audiences were ready for something grittier than the hair rock which had become extremely formulaic by that point. Once it had been streamlined and made somewhat more consumer-friendly (Enter Sandman) it sold like hotcakes. Another thing to bear in mind is that the somewhat drastic change in popular tastes from bright-and-shiny 80's-ness to the "grittier" 90s follows the early 90s recession and Gulf War pretty closely.
Oh right so you'd argue late 1990/early 1991 rather than the beginning of 1990 or late 1991/1992's grunge explosion for the true end of the 80s?
 
Old 11-28-2012, 03:36 PM
 
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1993 was the year that the mass-media started using the phrase "information superhighway." Computer technology was becoming a lot more mainstream through games like Myst, as well as Windows 3.1. The WWW was in its infancy, but "online services" - which included everything from basic banking functions to buying tickets in advance to posting on the Usenet - were widespread enough to where companies like CompuServe and Prodigy mounted national TV ad campaigns for their products.

I think that was another aspect of the "end of the 80's" - the image of "the computer" shifted toward more of a common household product than a specialty device for businessmen or science nerds. CDs began to augment and then gradually replace floppy disks. Bigger hard drives made it possible to store a wider range of files and applications without having to spend money on additional space.
 
Old 11-28-2012, 04:19 PM
 
Location: The Big O
592 posts, read 639,942 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dude111 View Post
Thats the year sesame street changed and became COMPLETE CRAP!
And I thought that I was the only person who noticed that.
 
Old 11-28-2012, 04:22 PM
 
Location: On the edge of the universe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by belmont22 View Post
Asking People older than 30.

I was born in '90 and I was wondering, was the atmosphere, culture, and way people acted in 1990, 1991, and 1992 more or less identical to how people acted in the mid and late 80s, or was it suddenly different as soon the 90s hit?

I don't see a huge difference between 2006 and 2012 aside from social media being bigger, more dance music and less rap, were 1986 and 1992 any more different or about the same difference?
I am 30 years old but due to my parent's decisions and where we lived in the world I lived in a similar manner to people who grew up in the 80s. I remember writing out reports and essay by hand through most of grade school. Starting in 5th - 6th grade I used an electronic typewriter/word processor (not a microcomputer) to write school reports. We bought a computer system in 1993 but was mostly for my parent's use until maybe 11th grade for me (1998 - 1999). The first computer I ever used was actually the ancient Apple All in one units (remember...the ones with the green pixels) at elementary school to play Number Munchers or Oregon Trail in class. That was one of the few times that school was actually fun to me! I listened to a lot of 70s and 80s music and carried myself like an 80s kid even though I was in the 90s, LOL!

As far as 1986 being different from 1992 goes: yes, they were different but mostly due to a more opening of society from what I've experienced. The 90s were probably the most tolerant decade that I can think of but the 1980s were probably more live and let live. 1992 probably had a more Asian influence in comparison to 1986 (e.g. anime and video games) as well.

Oh, and 2006 is better than today. Social media and Web 2.0 Suck!
 
Old 11-29-2012, 12:51 AM
 
2,930 posts, read 3,687,646 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fireandice1000 View Post
I am 30 years old but due to my parent's decisions and where we lived in the world I lived in a similar manner to people who grew up in the 80s. I remember writing out reports and essay by hand through most of grade school. Starting in 5th - 6th grade I used an electronic typewriter/word processor (not a microcomputer) to write school reports. We bought a computer system in 1993 but was mostly for my parent's use until maybe 11th grade for me (1998 - 1999). The first computer I ever used was actually the ancient Apple All in one units (remember...the ones with the green pixels) at elementary school to play Number Munchers or Oregon Trail in class. That was one of the few times that school was actually fun to me! I listened to a lot of 70s and 80s music and carried myself like an 80s kid even though I was in the 90s, LOL!
One difference in the 80ies at least you would have maybe typed a few special assignments in High school. In high school I used an electronic typewriter shared by another family member. Grade school was all pen/paper. College level however required typing. My family got the first "real" computer (win 3.1-due to disputes over electronic typewriter memory) about that time when I was in College.

I remember using the PET by commodore in grade school and esp. the Apple 2(which was a two unit computer that usually but not always had a monochrome monitor) in grade school and a bit in High school(latter replaced by old DOS IBMS)and owned an Atari.
The GUI and the built in Hard drive really changed the nature of computing not to mention floppy drives being something built in instead of being an extra option. One thing I love about the 90ies, the death of the dot matrix printer as being the usual printer on a home or business computer. No more screeching noise.
 
Old 12-03-2012, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Central Jersey
386 posts, read 545,952 times
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As someone who felt a bit out of step in the late 80s in high school, I would agree with the posters that said a transition took place around 1991-92 or so. In high school in the late 80s I felt the dominant culture was synthetic, materialistic, a bit too shallow and optimistic for my brooding, neo-hippie/punkie teenage self. There had been a thriving "alternative" scene throughout the 80s, but it felt marginal until the early 90s, when it suddenly became cool and mainstream to wear flannel and brood. Nirvana and Pearl Jam were played incessantly on MTV, and people traded in their jewel toned sweaters, jellies sandals and colorful jamz shorts for earth-tones, combat boots and more "authentic" (yet marketable) rebellious posturing. Or so it seemed at the time.
 
Old 02-04-2013, 10:15 AM
 
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1993 was the true start of the 1990's. 1992 still had "The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles" in it. Things were starting to change more around that time. People still wore Levi 501 shirts, Cosby Sweaters, and College Sweatshirts in 1992. The pop culture of Clinton's times were starting to show more during mid-'92. People still lived in a very late 80's type atmosphere. 1993 was when I began to see more plaid and white shirts. It was not the norm to dress like that. 1993 was the last time people dressed late 80's. MTV was playing the video "Nuthin But a G Thang" in 1993, not '92. Snoop Doggy Dogg was on every magazine cover in '93. That brought in the chronicle leave hats and Ben Davis shirts. Alternative music was already getting recognition by the end of 1988. The Pixies, Janes Addiction, and Soundgarden did not catch on like Nirvana. A lot of people, in my neck of the woods, mix up 1992 with 1994. '94 was when most began to see almost every teenager wear flannel. In 1992 people started to wear No Fear, Stussy, and Mossimo. We were much closer to 1993 in late 1991-1992. Everything born from 1989-1992 became mainstream in 1993.
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