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Old 02-06-2013, 02:52 AM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NickL28 View Post
No, the 2000's have expanded this affluence but it is mostly illusory as people didn't really as much on credit cards for frivolous stuff as they did starting say past 2001.. Most are just or much more materialistic & shallow than in the 1990s.
I don't know where you were in 2007, but it sure as heck wasn't America evidently.

 
Old 02-06-2013, 11:05 AM
 
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Watching the music video to "I Don't Wanna Fall in Love"-Jane Child on MTV. That song really opened 1990 for me.

Looking for Leatherhead (crocodile), Metalhead (the robot) and April 'O Neil at Mervyns.

Playing pencil break.

Making Dan Quayle jokes.

Talking about saving the rainforce.

Wearing acid wash Levi's, PONY sneakers and a Cosby Sweater.

Talking about Doogie Howser MD and "new" Simpsons episodes.

-Those are some memories I have from the earliest part of 1990.
 
Old 02-09-2013, 05:45 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tpk-nyc View Post
My point is that fashion, style and popular culture has become a lot subtler. It doesn’t go off on trends and tangents like it used to. You could walk down the street in any of those outfits and not call undue attention to yourself or appear as if you were wearing a costume. Same thing with the haircuts.

If that photo were taken today, the men might have a little stubble and glasses. But the silhouette would be similar.
I would agree but I think when you consider the first season of Friends is close to 20 years ago now, the differences have added up a lot. However, I doubt it would look too out of place in the year 2000.
 
Old 02-09-2013, 08:54 PM
 
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What I remember is that there was a very quick turn around from the 80s to the 90s. The 80s were a decade were certain pop culture events burned out really fast and the decade itself got old qucik, but it's still a very nostlagically fondly remembered time. 1990 and early 1991 was still sorta like 1989, but not completely. But like others have said, by 1992 and 1993 the 80s were gone. Especially 1993, Bill Clinton was President, The X-Files were on TV, it was not the 80s. I graduated high school in 1993, so I started in the fall of 1989, it was still "the 80s", although by that point no one really wanted to talk to much about the 80s, or use stereotypical 80s slang like "rad" or something like that w/o people thinking you were a loser that was 5 years out of date. But if you look back at the clothes and the music we listened to it was clearly late 80s. My junior and senior years of 1992 and 1993 were so different from my earlier years of high school, it was all grunge and the rap scene had a more distinct presence then rappers of the late 80s. The hair metal power bands like Warrant and Bon Jovi were seen as yesterdays news and old school, but still fondly remembered. This may be hard for someone who wasn't around to grasp, b/c if you look at certain movies from 1992, 1993 and even 1994 you might think it's "80s", just b/c it doesn't look like what your memory of 1999 was, but the atmosphere and music was very 90s. I believe the early 80s also had a quick turn around from the 70s. The last two decades however, the 00s and 10s, have had an extended melding of the late portion of the previous decade. The "real 80s" was more 1982-'86 anyways. But keep in mind there are always pockets of people that still hold onto hairstyles and fashions no matter what year it is. I knew a guy who was still running around with a mullet in 1997, and I remember dudes were already getting kidded over their mullet hair by 1990, but not everyone wanted to get rid of them.

Last edited by Jax331; 02-09-2013 at 09:08 PM..
 
Old 02-09-2013, 09:36 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by belmont22 View Post
Um, not really. I highly doubt any kid today would find a movie from 2006 that old looking. Kids don't even consider the 90s that old. The difference between 1990 and 1996/97 is much more significant than the difference between the mid 00s and today.

I think it's because styles changed so rapidly in the 80s and 90s, compared to since 2000 which changes pretty glacially. Unless I payed attention to the technological gadgets people were using the past 7 years or so all looks more or less exactly the same. The early 00s is actually starting to look a little bit older though, some of those Bush-era documentaries definitely seem like period pieces now for instance.

As to Home Alone. Home Alone is definitely a bit of a different feeling from a 1985 movie but I think it's equally if not more different from a grungy mid 90s film like Jerry MaGuire. It definitely has a classic feel common to 80s films that late 90s and 2000s films lack, at least IMO. Especially the first one from 1990. I think you could easily put it alongside Adventures in Babysitting, ET and Honey I Shrunk the Kids and it wouldn't stick out as being too modern to be put amongst them.
Home Alone was made by John Hughes and directed by Chris Columbus, two guys who were 80s film giants. So ofcourse the movie would "feel" 1989, I bet some of the movie was even shot in late 1989/early 1990 for the fall 1990 release.

I'm 37 and to me the 90s are dated. I'll watch an episode of Seinfeld and see Jerry pull out the antenna to his phone and think "wow what an ancient piece of junk". The TV sets and computer monitors seem clunky and overall the 90s are dated to me, even though I can clearly remember what I was doing in 1997 and 1998 like yesterday and the late 90s don't feel that long ago to me. I'm sure to you, it was a life time ago, b/c you were just a little kid in the late 90s. Now I know how people well into their 30s felt back in the 90s when they looked at people my age back then when were teens/early 20s. We went from being the punk kids and slackers that were up to no good to the over 30 crowd in no time. Hell 40 is even creeping up on me. It will happen to you too, it's life.

As you get older you realize that people in the past were really no different from you at all. These questions you ask us about the 80s and 90s, we asked people older then us about the 1950s-70s. I used to think people that lived in 1955 must have been so wildly different, but truthfully now I know that people even in 1755 worked, went to school (if possible), loved and lived. Then time goes by and the past seems quaint and trivial, but it strengthens the old adage, "the more things change, the more they stay the same". All the stuff older people used to tell me as a kid in the 80s and 90s makes a lot more sense to me now as an adult in my 30s.

You're not really going to understand some of these concepts about time and pop culture shifts until a kid born in 2005 asks you what life in 2009 was like compared to 2004. Ofcourse we live in a cosmos of astronomical age, where a 100,000 years is nothing more then a blink of an eye....but to human lifespan parameters, a few years or 20, 30 years might feel like another world away.

Last edited by Jax331; 02-09-2013 at 09:53 PM..
 
Old 02-09-2013, 10:07 PM
 
Location: New York City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by belmont22 View Post
I don't see a huge difference between 2006 and 2012 aside from social media being bigger, more dance music and less rap, were 1986 and 1992 any more different or about the same difference?
Now that I think about it, it seems like the 80s ended early rather than late. Reagan left office in 1988 and by the time the Berlin Wall fell in 1989 it really felt like a different era.

Part of it was that—even at the time—high 80s style felt vaguely campy and ridiculous. By 1989 people felt they had to tone it down. Big hair, shoulder pads and too much makeup were looking tacky by then. Of course some people still dress that way today, but 90s definitely brought in a more natural look.

There was a huge difference between 1986 and 1992.
 
Old 02-10-2013, 12:01 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tpk-nyc View Post
Now that I think about it, it seems like the 80s ended early rather than late. Reagan left office in 1988 and by the time the Berlin Wall fell in 1989 it really felt like a different era.

Part of it was that—even at the time—high 80s style felt vaguely campy and ridiculous. By 1989 people felt they had to tone it down. Big hair, shoulder pads and too much makeup were looking tacky by then. Of course some people still dress that way today, but 90s definitely brought in a more natural look.

There was a huge difference between 1986 and 1992.
I think this decade started early too. I think up to 2005 was still basically a wash-over of the later 90s, but 2006 onwards is pretty much a distinct period. There's nothing at all different about 2006 in my opinion aside from technological differences which seem quite superficial when not coupled by a stylistic and societal shift. Sure we have smartphones and stuff now, but we use them to listen to similar music and to watch similar/the same TV shows as we did back in the pre-iPhone days of 2006.

There really was no "Noughties" as a distinct decade in my opinion, we went straight from being stuck in the 90s for an extra 5-6 years to starting the 2010s early. In retrospect I can pinpoint this shift more or less exactly to the fall of 2005.

2005 had Mariah Carey's comeback and even a music hit by Will Smith. The Backstreet Boys also made a comeback and social networking was only just emerging as a fad. Most people still connected to the Net via dial-up too. Green Day were the biggest band that year. By the end of the year YouTube and MySpace were getting popular and Fall Out Boy released Sugar, We're Goin' Down which was the "Teen Spirit" of emo and killed off the numetal bands in the same way Nirvana killed off the hair bands.

2005 was still very much like 1995 in a lot of ways, but by 2006 emo was big, bright colors came back into fashion, girls started taking pictures with duckface and wearing pony tail holders on their wrists, and hip hop started to incorporate elements of electronic music.

There was never a backlash against the early 2000s simply for "being" the early 2000s, but I also noticed that artists like Ja Rule, Ashanti, and Ciara that were huge during that time were yesterday's news by the time it was 2007 and a couple years past that, it became all about Lady Gaga and Kesha.

Nu metal is something that today's teenagers wouldn't relate to either, even if the artists are still able to make a living because some of their 20 and 30 something fans have remained faithful. Most of today's teenagers seem to prefer indie rock, emo and post-hardcore over nu metal and post grunge.

The youngest Nickelback and Korn fans seem to be born around 1992 generally speaking.
 
Old 02-10-2013, 12:15 PM
 
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I also think the fact the Noughties never had an identity of their own, but rather seem like a bridge between the 90s and current decade, means that the 90s nostalgia train won't really start rolling until the 2020s come along.

There actually already is a large 90s nostalgia movement but I've noticed it tends to revolve around childhood fads, it's very narrow in its focus. Nostalgia for the decades prior to the 90s tended to incorporate childhood, teenhood and young adulthood.

We probably won't hear about people missing their teens and 20s in the 90s until this period is over since, let's face it, the 90s as an era lasted from about 92/93 up to 2005 so we've really only been "out" of the 90s woods for about 7 years.

When the people born in 1980 turn 40 *shudders* there will likely be a big 90s nostalgia movement.
 
Old 02-11-2013, 12:46 AM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
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The music was a big part of the emergence of 90s culture, but technology is an even bigger part. The 1980s had computers but they really were almost like toys. The 90s brought the usable computer, the internet/world wide web and cell phones. The technology of the ninteys changed our lives, and it defines the 90s. The music changed slowly between 1990 and 1993, and the technology changed in a period between 93-95 for most of us. I resisted the internet untill 1998, and I was one of the last holdouts against it. Most people were online by 95. In a short period of time we became a society totaly dependent (overdependent) on this new technology.
 
Old 02-11-2013, 02:42 AM
 
2,096 posts, read 3,651,393 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
The music was a big part of the emergence of 90s culture, but technology is an even bigger part. The 1980s had computers but they really were almost like toys. The 90s brought the usable computer, the internet/world wide web and cell phones. The technology of the ninteys changed our lives, and it defines the 90s. The music changed slowly between 1990 and 1993, and the technology changed in a period between 93-95 for most of us. I resisted the internet untill 1998, and I was one of the last holdouts against it. Most people were online by 95. In a short period of time we became a society totaly dependent (overdependent) on this new technology.
Nah, I certainly wouldn't say most people were online by 1995. Yes the WWW was invented in 1989/1990, but only about 10-15 percent of the American population was online in 1995.

That number did not reach 50 percent until around 2001. Even today only about 1/3 of the world's population are Internet users.

I think the 2000s and 2010s really are the "technology" decades. The 90s had something of a pop culture going for it, not to the extent of the 80s but it wasn't fully immersed into the "age of tech" like today is.

Another difference is that cell phones were mostly for business people in the 90s, even though they were familiar items there was not a teenage cell phone culture outside of Clueless.
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