U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > History
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Closed Thread Start New Thread
 
Old 02-11-2013, 08:12 PM
 
126 posts, read 375,054 times
Reputation: 96

Advertisements

1986 (pre-'87) - Sly Fox type dance music,Timex Social Club type R&B, Coca Cola Sweatshirts, Miami Vice pastels, rolled up sleeves, and Malcom-Jamal Warner is a big star on NBC.

1992 (post-'87) - Technotronic type dance music, New Jack Swing/ Mariah Carey type R&B, Stussy, No Fear, Nike Air logo shirts, Button Your Fly, Hypercolor, Z. Cavaricci, Big Johnson, Mossimo, Cross Colours jackets, and Malcom-Jamal Warner is still on NBC for the full year. In the spring, he was last on The Cosby Show. In the fall, he was on a show called Here and Now.

 
Old 02-12-2013, 04:11 AM
 
2,096 posts, read 3,651,393 times
Reputation: 1213
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymous14 View Post
1986 (pre-'87) - Sly Fox type dance music,Timex Social Club type R&B, Coca Cola Sweatshirts, Miami Vice pastels, rolled up sleeves, and Malcom-Jamal Warner is a big star on NBC.

1992 (post-'87) - Technotronic type dance music, New Jack Swing/ Mariah Carey type R&B, Stussy, No Fear, Nike Air logo shirts, Button Your Fly, Hypercolor, Z. Cavaricci, Big Johnson, Mossimo, Cross Colours jackets, and Malcom-Jamal Warner is still on NBC for the full year. In the spring, he was last on The Cosby Show. In the fall, he was on a show called Here and Now.
What was the first example of that House music that was popular during that very late 80s and throughout much of the 90s? Maybe Pump Up The Volume by MARRS? I could see that song being from as late as 1995 even though it came out in 1988.
 
Old 02-12-2013, 05:18 AM
 
Location: Plymouth,Michigan/Quad Cities, (IA/IL)
332 posts, read 602,183 times
Reputation: 355
Quote:
Originally Posted by tpk-nyc View Post
My point is that fashion, style and popular culture has become a lot subtler. It doesn’t go off on trends and tangents like it used to. You could walk down the street in any of those outfits and not call undue attention to yourself or appear as if you were wearing a costume. Same thing with the haircuts.

If that photo were taken today, the men might have a little stubble and glasses. But the silhouette would be similar.
I agree with you--things are not that much different. You could wear something now that you wore in 1996, or have a hair style that you had then and it wouldn't stand out that much. The styles and looks of the 60's-mid 80's were more extreme and would look very odd and/or dated now.
 
Old 02-12-2013, 09:11 AM
 
126 posts, read 375,054 times
Reputation: 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by belmont22 View Post
What was the first example of that House music that was popular during that very late 80s and throughout much of the 90s? Maybe Pump Up The Volume by MARRS? I could see that song being from as late as 1995 even though it came out in 1988.
Phuture - Acid Tracks?

Pump Up the Volume was a much bigger hit. 1989-1993 were the best years for acid house music. The Bush Sr. era ties the 80's with the 90's.'89 was pretty different from '87-'88. The spring of '89 was very late 80's for awhile. Then, The Morton Downey Jr. Show, the Simpsons shorts, Dynasty, Miami Vice, Small Wonder, and Family Ties were all cancelled. ALF was not as popular in late '89 as the show was from '87-'88. Mid '89, in retrospect, looks very 90's. Tim Burton's Batman differed completely from Richard Donner's Superman. I do not recall seeing the Simpsons again until "Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire". 1989 had more in the very early 90's (1990-1992). During that year, people started wearing Girbaud, Generra Sportswear, Z. Cavaricci, and Jumpman clothing. In the Papa Bush era, it was important to wear logos on your shirts. Children wore Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles or Super Mario shirts. Teenagers wore Starter, Z. Cavaricci, Generra, any Sportswear, anything from Chess King/Merry Go Round, Guess, Hugo Boss, Girbaud, Vision Skatewear, Limpies, Rude Dog, Quiksilver, and those leather 8-ball jackets. In this time, Metalheads wore flannel with band shirts. I believe Grunge fans were inspired by them, back in 1994. 1989-1992 was never Nineties the way 1993-1999 was.
 
Old 02-12-2013, 09:31 AM
 
126 posts, read 375,054 times
Reputation: 96
Phuture - Acid Tracks?

Pump Up the Volume was a much bigger hit. 1989-1993 were the best years for acid house music. The Bush Sr. era ties the 80's with the 90's.'89 was pretty different from '87-'88. The spring of '89 was very late 80's for awhile. Then, The Morton Downey Jr. Show, the Simpsons shorts, Dynasty, Miami Vice, Small Wonder, and Family Ties were all cancelled. ALF was not as popular in late '89 as the show was from '87-'88. Mid '89, in retrospect, looks very 90's. Tim Burton's Batman differed completely from Richard Donner's Superman. I do not recall seeing the Simpsons again until "Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire". 1989 had more in common with the very early 90's (1990-1992). Love Ballads and Adult Contemporary hits were all you could hear on the radio. During that year, people started wearing Girbaud, Generra Sportswear, Z. Cavaricci, and Jumpman clothing. In the Papa Bush era, it was important to wear logos on your shirts. Children wore Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles or Super Mario shirts. Teenagers wore Starter, Z. Cavaricci, Generra, any Sportswear, anything from Chess King/Merry Go Round, Guess, Hugo Boss, Girbaud, Vision Skatewear, Limpies, Rude Dog, Quiksilver, and those leather 8-ball jackets. In this time, Metalheads wore flannel with band shirts. I believe Grunge fans,back in '94, were inspired by them. 1989-1992 was never Nineties the way 1993-1999 was.
 
Old 02-13-2013, 01:07 PM
 
Location: On the edge of the universe
994 posts, read 1,295,351 times
Reputation: 1400
Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
I disagree.

The nineties was skateboards, hacky-sack, the golden age of Video Games, good cartoons, the revolution of adult cartoon shows, etc. The nineties had a very distinct look and feel and sound compared especially to our current decade.

The twenty-tens have been, texting, glued to phones, netspeak lol ikr idk, a wasteland of first person shooters, the dominant age of the online and PC game, and let's face it, the internet has had complete control of culture since the early two thousands.

Another difference; the nineties were very affluent times for many Americans. The two thousands on have been full of recession, poverty and financial crisis on a global scale. This has shown itself in people's attitudes.

There is plenty more than I have mentioned. My point is the nineties has not had this long a reach.
I agree with you on this as well. I think the 90s and previous decades had a more 'happier' feel to them overall. I also think that society wasn't as trivial or superficial as today as well. I do believe that society did have problems back then and many of those problems are still here today. However, I think that people tended to trust each other a bit more back then mainly because America's social fabric was much stronger in those decades. It was starting to fray probably even back long before most of us were born but at least it was still mostly peaceful.

I know a lot of people mentioned how computers and the Internet have changed society since the 80s. Before the Internet computers were expensive and mostly for corporate, government, or scientific research. The Internet was available for quite some time but really didn't take off until the DotCom boom. I think 1996 is a barrier between pre-Internet and Internet society. Then, in 2000-2001 you had the dot-com meltdown and from that point until 2006 or so was more of a plateau in society in general. To me, 1996 - 2006 was pretty much the same for the most part. From 2006 on you have the social media / Facebooker era and I can tell the difference between Facebook Era and the Dotcom Era; the Dotcom Era had better culture, more civility and a more live-and-let live philosophy (not to mention more genuine individuality). However, the Facebook Era is like the Walmart of all Eras; cheap consumer products and culture, trashy music/entertainment, a fake hivemind in the form of social media, and a witch hunt mentality in everything from politics to business, people's personal lives, etc...yes, there is a BIG difference between today and pre-social media Society.
 
Old 02-13-2013, 03:04 PM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
4,245 posts, read 5,747,512 times
Reputation: 2953
I think we had a "long 90s"....the 1980s ended in 1988 or so. After the stock market crash in 1987. So the 1990s lasted from late 1987 or 1988 to maybe 9-11.


9-11 and the recession that followed it ushered in a new era.
 
Old 02-13-2013, 05:03 PM
 
2,096 posts, read 3,651,393 times
Reputation: 1213
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayton Sux View Post
I think we had a "long 90s"....the 1980s ended in 1988 or so. After the stock market crash in 1987. So the 1990s lasted from late 1987 or 1988 to maybe 9-11.


9-11 and the recession that followed it ushered in a new era.
You know, I was watching the video for Every Little Step by Bobby Brown (song is from 1988) and was pretty surprised at how 90s it seemed. Kind of amazing it's 25 years old.

Late 80s/early 90s had its own feel imo. The New Jack Swing era, fall of the Eastern Bloc, rise of hip hop, the last of glam metal and classic rock. Whether it's more similar to 1980-86 or to 1993-01 is just a matter of opinion I suppose.
 
Old 02-14-2013, 11:53 AM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
4,245 posts, read 5,747,512 times
Reputation: 2953
I saw it as sort of the rise of indy/alt rock. Stuff like the Indigo Girls, Uncle Tupelo, etc, and lesser known bands like, say, Eleventh Dream Day and Midnight Oil and Poi Dog Pondering (which was a good "90s Band").

Stuff that was sort bubbling along in the background sort of became more popular. I think you could say Matt Groening and the Simpsons as an example in another venue, or Johnny Depp (21 Jump Street then into movies like Whats Eating Glibert Grape).

...and that 'Manchester Sound' & Rave thing....

Interesting era. setting the stage for the rest of the 1990s.

For nowadays hard to figure it out.
 
Old 02-14-2013, 02:03 PM
 
5,767 posts, read 10,024,297 times
Reputation: 3809
Quote:
I was watching the video for Every Little Step by Bobby Brown (song is from 1988) and was pretty surprised at how 90s it seemed.
I get the sense that at least part of what we associate with different cultural "eras" in the recent past comes from changes in video editing technology. Especially music videos, many of which had relatively small budgets, and were limited in scope by the amount of editing and processing that could be done in post-production. So, big-budget videos looked more like traditional cinematic productions, but "downscale" videos often tried to utilize production gimmicks to stand out on TV. And these techniques sometimes bled over into big-budget videos as well.

Hence, there's a change in the style of a lot of music videos around 1987/88, which is when the first workable desktop digital video editing suites began to hit the consumer market. There had been earlier systems, but they were either extremely expensive (tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars), or they required extensive traditional video editing equipment in addition to the computer, or their capabilities were limited to things like superimposing some words on a scene.

But by the late 80's, it became possible for lower-budget videos to insert digital production elements into videos. This kind of early desktop CGI often looked clunky, but it was a definite shift. I think this technological change is why the very late 80's and early 90's were sort of a garish age in terms of video production. Lots of people had sudden access to new editing toys, and they couldn't help themselves. Sort of like early self-made webpages on Geocities/Angelfire/et. al.
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > History
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top