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Old 12-27-2012, 06:07 PM
Status: "if UNTHAW is a word ..i want to UN-AGE ," (set 5 days ago)
 
17,281 posts, read 22,339,385 times
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its funny to this day june weddings are still very popular, but I do believe june was a popular month because flowers were in bloom, and flowers masked b.o. and horseshhit/ cow manure stench

This thread is very interesting- and I agree with the poster that stated,,,, if we stopped to think about it,,,there was horse and cow crap everywhere.

the phrase "throw the baby out with the bathwater" is derived from hundreds of years ago- having only a few baths a year,,,the family would get in line, with the father going first,,then mother,,then to the youngest, you would think they'd change the water, but from what ive read,,,,by the time they get to the baby it was so dirty they couldnt see it...hence the phrase


we must have stunk soooo bad,,,years ago,,i cant imagine going a few days without a shower- maybe the smell of woodsmoke (fireplaces) and bacon overtook the household b.o.
also,,,most were farmers so the chicken/pig/cow/horse shhit probly smelled worse than we did.....

ITS very interesting and humbling to hear that some folks today can remember using outhouses, growing up

years ago,,, I think going swimming would be my favorite date activity with a girl- both of us, wouldnt smell so bad....
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Old 12-28-2012, 03:27 AM
 
Location: Vladivostok, Russia
122 posts, read 140,926 times
Reputation: 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by tvdxer View Post
The reason is simple: the plumbing in those countries can't handle paper. Just as if you were to flush a ream of letter paper down the toilet (or tampons, etc.) here, toilet paper clogs the pipes and often requires "de-clogging" which can be a very unpleasant process.
I've had a wow factor once in my home city of Vladivostok, Russia - a restroom in a Hundai (Korean) Hotel had a sign to not throw anything in the toilet, but in a basket nearby. It's a brand new hotel, and city's sewer pipes can handle anything.

Wierd. And there's a lot of it in Asia.
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Old 12-28-2012, 03:28 AM
 
Location: Vladivostok, Russia
122 posts, read 140,926 times
Reputation: 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
There needs to be an advance in wiping after using the toilet!
There actually is - it's called running water and soap.
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Old 12-28-2012, 09:54 AM
 
9,220 posts, read 18,168,360 times
Reputation: 22001
Quote:
Originally Posted by mainebrokerman View Post
its funny to this day june weddings are still very popular, but I do believe june was a popular month because flowers were in bloom, and flowers masked b.o. and horseshhit/ cow manure stench
....
I think the June wedding tradition also came about because people would sew themselves into their long underwear in the late fall, and wear the longjohns all winter, without bathing. Then in the Spring, they would take off the funky underwear and have a bath. What better time for a wedding? You wouldn't see lots of people rushing to get married in late February, when their first time naked with someone would be disgusting and smelly.
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Old 12-28-2012, 02:23 PM
 
9,220 posts, read 18,168,360 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TracySam View Post
I've always thought the history of deaths from "childbed fever" was an interesting hygiene tale.


It was very common from the 1600s (when physicians attending to childbirth became more common) to the mid-1800s for women to die from infection shortly after giving birth, this was commonly called childbed fever. There was no concept of germs, and physicians rarely washed their hands. They would examine patient after patient, transferring bacteria from patient to patient, in hospitals and when doing house calls.

A Viennese doctor, Ignaz Semmelweiss, began to study the problem in the 1840s, and continued throught the 1850s. He found in a Vienna hospital that doctors would perform autopsies all morning, then have lunch, then without having washed their hands all day, examine women in the maternity wards. They found that women attended by midwives had a much lower rate of childbed (puerperal) fever than those attended by doctors. The midwives didn't perform autopsies, and tended to wash their hands more. Semmelweiss found similar findings in a subsequent study in Hungary. He urged doctors to wash their hands, and use disinfectant, but with both published studies, his findings were mostly ignored.

He kept on for years, trying to get the European medical establishment to wash and disinfect their hands and instruments. He was ridiculed and alienated, and subsequently fell into a deep depression. He ended up in a mental institution, where he later died, ironically, of an infection that had set into a wound he had gotten.

Years later, Louis Pasteur's research confirmed Semmelweiss's theory, and eventually, he was lauded as an important figure in medical history (better late than never I guess).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puerperal_fever


Ignaz Semmelweis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Since I posted this before realizing the OP wanted to discuss hygiene in America specifically, I wanted to see how and when the above issue was addressed in the US. Interestingly, it was Oliver Wendell Holmes, a American contemporary of Semmelweiss, who independently came to the same conclusions Semmelweiss did. He was also fought by the medical establishment, but he eventually won, and his later career was much more successful than Semmelweiss's, as we all know.

He published "The Contagiousness of Puerperal Fever" in 1843, in which he theorized that puerpural fever was caused by germs carried by doctors to other patients, and found some doctors even contracted the infection themselves (and died). His theory was attacked, but he persisted and published the info in a pamphlet in 1855. This pamphlet is now considered a "landmark" in germ theory in modern medicine.
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Old 12-28-2012, 07:06 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,666 posts, read 71,935,340 times
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The only people I ever encounter whom I can smell, are the ones who go through a sheep dip of commercial fragrances and then go out smelling like a Glade plugin. They are the ones who need to wash the smell off. Everybody else just smells like people, at various levels of cleanliness, and I never find that offensive.

A person who does not work strenuously, indoors, in a cool to moderate climate, certainly does not get "dirty" enough to need to do a complete body bathe every single day of their lives. The idea that they do is a pathology.

Americans who are hysterical about cleanliness (that's almost all of them), then wear their outdoor shoes in their house (again, almost all of them). Go figure.
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Old 12-29-2012, 08:47 PM
 
1,459 posts, read 2,135,550 times
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jtur88, that is largely true.

I shower every other day, and only go to every day if I've gotten really sweaty, been working physically, etc. Or after sex. I don't even start to smell till about 48 hours after a shower. I know that if I told some of my aquaintances that, they'd be grossed out, however illogically.

What I wonder about are those of us with oily hair. People who don't naturally have high oil production try to talk about how not using shampoo will help things, but that is crap. People with my skin and scalp type back in the day must have had ROUGH looking hair.
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Old 12-29-2012, 11:24 PM
 
Location: Iowa
2,618 posts, read 2,912,553 times
Reputation: 3122
The dental problems would be of more concern to me, than the smells of the past. Even with the first fluoride toothpaste introduced in the 1890's, the ADA didn't get around to endorsing it until the 1950's. Think of life with no toothbrush or toothpaste, can't imagine too many people eating a whole lot of sweets after age 20 or so, the pain from cavities must have been intense. Going to the dentist without novacaine and getting a tooth drilled or pulled out with a pair of pliers.....oh good times......and garlic breath would be everywhere.....now were back to the smells again......nooooo !
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Old 12-29-2012, 11:56 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,441 posts, read 16,802,365 times
Reputation: 16496
Quote:
Originally Posted by mainebrokerman View Post
its funny to this day june weddings are still very popular, but I do believe june was a popular month because flowers were in bloom, and flowers masked b.o. and horseshhit/ cow manure stench

This thread is very interesting- and I agree with the poster that stated,,,, if we stopped to think about it,,,there was horse and cow crap everywhere.

the phrase "throw the baby out with the bathwater" is derived from hundreds of years ago- having only a few baths a year,,,the family would get in line, with the father going first,,then mother,,then to the youngest, you would think they'd change the water, but from what ive read,,,,by the time they get to the baby it was so dirty they couldnt see it...hence the phrase


we must have stunk soooo bad,,,years ago,,i cant imagine going a few days without a shower- maybe the smell of woodsmoke (fireplaces) and bacon overtook the household b.o.
also,,,most were farmers so the chicken/pig/cow/horse shhit probly smelled worse than we did.....

ITS very interesting and humbling to hear that some folks today can remember using outhouses, growing up

years ago,,, I think going swimming would be my favorite date activity with a girl- both of us, wouldnt smell so bad....
You have to remember back before running water and water heaters, a bath was a big thing. It took hours to heat enough water on the stove, and usually the bath was done in the kitchen. It could be scooped out when done easier that way.

Even in wealthy houses, in the early 20th century, baths were occasional, since it wasn't possible to haul and heat all that water for everyone.

I think no hot water from the tap would be as hard to get used to for us as would not getting water.

As for the daily shower, its only needed for health reasons if you work in something which needs to be washed off. If its 115 out your shower is refreshing, but only temperary. Daily hair washing strips hair of its natual oil and allows a large industry which supplies conditioners to try to make up for it. I'm not saying we should not bathe more than once a month or anything like that, but that daily shower is just drying out your skin. This goes along with all the anti-bacterial craze. We didn't spray everything down for germs in the fifties either.

Give me someone who might have taken a shower that day next to me on the bus over someone who smells like the perfume counter....

Last edited by nightbird47; 12-30-2012 at 12:08 AM..
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Old 12-30-2012, 12:06 AM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,441 posts, read 16,802,365 times
Reputation: 16496
Quote:
Originally Posted by TracySam View Post
Since I posted this before realizing the OP wanted to discuss hygiene in America specifically, I wanted to see how and when the above issue was addressed in the US. Interestingly, it was Oliver Wendell Holmes, a American contemporary of Semmelweiss, who independently came to the same conclusions Semmelweiss did. He was also fought by the medical establishment, but he eventually won, and his later career was much more successful than Semmelweiss's, as we all know.

He published "The Contagiousness of Puerperal Fever" in 1843, in which he theorized that puerpural fever was caused by germs carried by doctors to other patients, and found some doctors even contracted the infection themselves (and died). His theory was attacked, but he persisted and published the info in a pamphlet in 1855. This pamphlet is now considered a "landmark" in germ theory in modern medicine.
Even after handwashing was practiced in hospitals, women chose a midwife and birth at home because it was still believed it was safer for most. It was rather shocking to find out the *normal* procedure during the fifties was to anethises the mother where she slept through it and could not help. Babies were also effected. Midwives, of course, couldn't do that. Interestingly, today, some hospitals use nurses trained as midwives for deliveries but within minutes of medical help if needed.
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