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Old 02-16-2013, 09:17 AM
 
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The superficial side is something like "alcohol makes you see death face to face".



but what is the deep side?
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Old 02-16-2013, 01:15 PM
 
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have you read John Barleycorn, or any of his 6 memoirs ?
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Old 02-16-2013, 04:26 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowball7 View Post
have you read John Barleycorn, or any of his 6 memoirs ?


I just finished JB, the audiobook version. The last chapters fully explains the whole white logic...but it sounded very gloomy and tenchical, I am not sure if I graped all the nuances.

Basicaly, white logic is an alcohol induced wisdon that makes you see the face of death, meawhile sober people emjoy live and its lies and supeficial ways.

But I guess there's more complicated than that.
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Old 02-17-2013, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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Is there a difference between "white logic" and "white noise"? Both are simply complex constructs that we have learned to feel comfortable with, but with no component parts that possess any merit by themselves.
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Old 02-18-2013, 02:53 PM
 
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best not to take this stuff seriously.
he was a good storyteller who drank way too much
and died young from it.
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Old 03-13-2017, 02:41 PM
 
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White Logic is the sadness one feels that the world is fundamentally flawed and there is little hope in fixing it. Drinking alcohol relives the sadness, and although the drinker knows that his cure will kill him eventually, the drinker doesn't care because they think, what is the point in living in such a sorry and pitiful world. The drinker who sees other people happily going about their business would believe that their mind has hit upon some basic truth about the pointlessness of things that has escaped others, and see these others as imperceptive, naive, and because of their lack of comprehension, very much a part of the problem.

Of course alcohol is a depressant and addictive, so the cure and the malady are maliciously linked together in the "White Logic" found in a heavy drinkers mind.

I'd guess the "white" in the term is akin to "white lighting" a slang term for moonshine just coming into usage around the time of the novel's writing. Or it could refer to the "clarity" of "coming to the light" to this depressing logic.

Happy hour yet?
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Old 03-13-2017, 07:00 PM
 
Location: Type 0.7 Kardashev
10,577 posts, read 6,872,459 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Javier77 View Post
I just finished JB, the audiobook version. The last chapters fully explains the whole white logic...but it sounded very gloomy and tenchical, I am not sure if I graped all the nuances.

Basicaly, white logic is an alcohol induced wisdon that makes you see the face of death, meawhile sober people emjoy live and its lies and supeficial ways.

But I guess there's more complicated than that.
London was just rationalizing his addiction.

"The idea that the creative endeavor and mind-altering substances are entwined is one of the great pop-intellectual myths of our time. Any claims that the drugs and alcohol are necessary to dull a finer sensibility are just the usual self-serving bull****."
--Stephen King, On Writing
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Old 03-27-2018, 06:03 PM
 
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He was rationalizing his addiction. That is what the addict will always do. I used to think people drink because they like to drink, but the nihilism of self destructive behavior is complex. Alcohol is particularly troubling because is makes you feel good, then bad, and if you keep using it it makes you feel really, really, really bad.

London saw that his addiction was killing him and wanted a force like prohibition to "cure" him, but in the daze of his addiction he could just not quit. That is the White Logic. Feel bad for him and other addicts, don't blame them.
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Old 03-27-2018, 07:03 PM
 
Location: Parts Unknown, Northern California
37,213 posts, read 17,536,561 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Unsettomati View Post
London was just rationalizing his addiction.

"The idea that the creative endeavor and mind-altering substances are entwined is one of the great pop-intellectual myths of our time. Any claims that the drugs and alcohol are necessary to dull a finer sensibility are just the usual self-serving bull****."
--Stephen King, On Writing
A) I wouldn't take any creative writing advice from King. He cranks out mass oriented literature. Popular and good are not necessarily synonymous.
B) What works for one artist doesn't have to work for all artists, and what impairs one might spark another. I don't think that it is coincidence that so many great writers were also substance abusers and juiceheads. Poe, Hemingway, Mailer, Hunter Thompson, Tennessee Williams, John Cheever, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Dorothy Parker, Truman Capote, William Faulkner, James Joyce....all of whom were better writers than Stephen King.
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Old 03-27-2018, 07:59 PM
 
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Alcohol and drugs are a tool, but must be used intelligently and below a level where the harm outdoes the benefit. When that starts to happen the intelligent response is to cut back, or avoid their use. Some people can handle substances better than others. I've used oxy for pain, but stopped when I was motivated by the euphoria rather than the pain killer. In the hospital for 23 days it was offered every 6 hours. I took it when I needed it and said no thanks when I didn't. I drank heavily for 50 years but never missed a class in school or a day's work, raised a family and retired with no financial worries. When I started to feel wired by the alcohol I'd cut back for a while. A couple of years ago illness forced me to quit alcohol and caffeine. I just stopped. No withdrawal symptoms from either. The Rolling Stones were heavy drug users. Bryan Jones and Mick Taylor couldn't handle it, the others could and became multimillionaires with loving families, having achieved fame and fortune, popularity and longevity. Being a user isn't the same as being an addict. The user learns when to cut back or stop, the addict doesn't. Churchill drank a quart of Gin every day. No one ever called him an addict or a drunk while he was winning WWII or serving as Prime Minister. Nixon was an alcoholic and it lead him into a downward spiral.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Grandstander View Post
A) I wouldn't take any creative writing advice from King. He cranks out mass oriented literature. Popular and good are not necessarily synonymous.
B) What works for one artist doesn't have to work for all artists, and what impairs one might spark another. I don't think that it is coincidence that so many great writers were also substance abusers and juiceheads. Poe, Hemingway, Mailer, Hunter Thompson, Tennessee Williams, John Cheever, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Dorothy Parker, Truman Capote, William Faulkner, James Joyce....all of whom were better writers than Stephen King.
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