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Old 09-19-2013, 02:37 PM
 
Location: Bel Air, California
20,399 posts, read 20,609,055 times
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Native Americans were very tuned into the spirit world and they probably knew any permanent structures they built would be destroyed by the Europeans and make it easier to find and shoot them. Most felt that to serpentine was their best strategy to stay alive.


The In-Laws (1979): Getting off the plane in Tijuara - YouTube
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Old 09-19-2013, 04:15 PM
 
Location: Michigan
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I remember in middle school learning about Cahokia at some point. It was actually a pretty decent sized permanent native American city. It's estimated that it's population reached up to 40,000 (and even had what we'd probably consider suburbs) at it's peak which is pretty unusual for Native American cities because they are mostly agrarian societies. They would have needed a pretty hefty supply of food and water to really keep the city sustained without modern technology. It seems like the city was abandoned before any Europeans arrived probably mostly due to it's unusually high population.

The only evidence of their existence are basically mounds and archaeological remains buried in the ground.


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...id_site_01.jpg

http://goo.gl/maps/gWDQ8

I remember reading somewhere that there used to be many scattered around the St. Louis area, but as the city was growing, most people just saw them as dirt hills and simply developed over them.
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Old 09-20-2013, 01:01 AM
 
Location: Phoenix Arizona
2,032 posts, read 3,869,983 times
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Here's some native structures in my state;
Navajo Nat'l Monument, Betatakin

Canyon de Chelly, White House

Tonto Nat'l Monument

Old Oraibi Arizona (1899 pic) one of the oldests, if not the oldest, continuously inhabited towns in America
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Old 09-23-2013, 12:08 AM
 
Location: Seattle, Washington
3,738 posts, read 6,254,169 times
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Aren't there some type of underwater pyramids in or around the Great Lakes region? I seem to remember hearing something like that once.
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Old 09-26-2013, 10:35 AM
 
Location: The Springs
1,765 posts, read 2,002,156 times
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Mesa Verde, Colorado, is another example of Native American architecture. However, many historians believe that the community was just abandoned, perhaps due to drought or fire and the indigenous people moved on.
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Old 09-26-2013, 03:24 PM
 
Location: North Idaho
21,156 posts, read 26,135,284 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dizzybint View Post
I watched a programme on tv this week about Colombian Indians who built houses of stone etc hundreds of years ago as did other cultures in South America but the native americans only seem to have some sort of mounds but no architecture at all as far as I can see, does anyone know why this happened..
The real questions are: Why do you think that native Americans didn't have structuire? Because they did.

Also, why is it that you don't know that the natives of South America were native Americans?
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Old 09-27-2013, 12:28 AM
 
5,799 posts, read 4,869,500 times
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Wow, I'm kind of astonished by the lack of knowledge exhibited here.

What people anywhere in the world build is directly related to two things: what kind of MATERIALS are available in their home environment, and what do they NEED.

Where there is plentiful wood, wood is used. Where there is stone, stone is used. If people NEED to stay in one place for a long time (are they primarily agricultural?), they are more likely to use whatever more permanent material is available to them. But if people NEED to move frequently (do they follow a pattern of seasonal hunting/seasonal agriculture?) they have structures that they either can move with them (think tipis) or which don't last long (wickiups).

Also, please note that mounds are generally burial sites, NOT related to housing for the living.

Here's a picture of the famous Chaco Canyon, which is located in New Mexico. The native people who built it were primarily agrarian, and stone and mud was easily available, trees were not:



Here's a picture of Mesa Verde, which is in Colorado:



Here's the website for the National Museum of the American Indian, which can connect you to lots of information: http://nmai.si.edu/explore/foreducatorsstudents/

You might also be interested in these links:

Native American Houses ***
Native American Housing | The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History
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Old 09-27-2013, 01:21 AM
 
Location: Windsor, Ontario, Canada
11,269 posts, read 12,577,993 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by animatedmartian View Post
I remember in middle school learning about Cahokia at some point. It was actually a pretty decent sized permanent native American city. It's estimated that it's population reached up to 40,000 (and even had what we'd probably consider suburbs) at it's peak which is pretty unusual for Native American cities because they are mostly agrarian societies. They would have needed a pretty hefty supply of food and water to really keep the city sustained without modern technology. It seems like the city was abandoned before any Europeans arrived probably mostly due to it's unusually high population.

The only evidence of their existence are basically mounds and archaeological remains buried in the ground.


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...id_site_01.jpg

http://goo.gl/maps/gWDQ8

I remember reading somewhere that there used to be many scattered around the St. Louis area, but as the city was growing, most people just saw them as dirt hills and simply developed over them.


This is where Mound Road gets its name, here in the Detroit region, AM. I guess those burial mounds used to be everywhere around here.
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Old 01-02-2014, 12:25 PM
 
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Ever hear of Cahokia? Native American city from c. 6001400 CE - at its peak, it was a larger city than London.

You may want to look up 'Mound Builders', Cahokian culture, Caddoan Mississippian culture, Fort Ancient culture and/or Plaquemine culture.
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Old 01-02-2014, 01:49 PM
 
1,661 posts, read 1,891,037 times
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They did, just not in the sense that Europeans did. They didn't have the same level of resources, technology, intellect, etc.
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