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Old 11-27-2018, 05:09 AM
 
Location: Under Moon & Star
1,715 posts, read 615,269 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Threestep View Post
Start with Huron and Iroquois long houses, Cherokee plantation homes, Mandan lodges, longhouses of the NW tribes, mounds of the GA tribes, cliff dwellings of the Mesas, ... Then look into the New England stone structures, ...
Quote:
Originally Posted by The_General View Post
I'm sure that's why they colonized Europe....
Let me see if I follow your -- ahem, 'logic'.

"Native Americans couldn't have built permanent dwellings because they never developed either transoceanic capability nor achieved the numbers to conquer another continent."

That's what you're going with?
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Old 11-27-2018, 07:29 AM
 
8,891 posts, read 9,720,182 times
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While I was reading books about The Journey of Discovery one book mentioned William Clark's older brother and harkened back to the time when being an Indian Killer was a thing to be proud of. There was an event where Europeans came upon a village of Indians who for all practical purposes were living in dwellings "like White people."As I remember they routed and burned them out anyway.
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Old 11-27-2018, 09:23 AM
 
Location: Sinking in the Great Salt Lake
13,000 posts, read 18,589,914 times
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Default Why did native americans not build structures

Indians DID build all sorts of structures.

Pit houses, long houses, wikiups (both of more or less permanent design), stone structures, adobe structures... there's a long list. Check out the Mound Builders...Cahokia was a gigantic permanent city in the Midwest, for example. The difference is whether the natives lived a permanent/semi-permanent or nomadic lifestyle.

Go to Mesa Verde or Chaco canyon... the stoneworks built by the Anasazi there are superb. Go further south to Mesoamerica and the natives built structures on par with anything build in the ancient Middle East. Go further south and the quality of the native stoneworks surpassed even Ancient Greece and Egypt. (see Puma Punku... the stone cutting is so exact that many people are convinced only aliens could have done it )
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Old 11-27-2018, 10:23 AM
 
Location: San Jose
1,586 posts, read 474,913 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chango View Post
Indians DID build all sorts of structures.

Pit houses, long houses, wikiups (both of more or less permanent design), stone structures, adobe structures... there's a long list. Check out the Mound Builders...Cahokia was a gigantic permanent city in the Midwest, for example. The difference is whether the natives lived a permanent/semi-permanent or nomadic lifestyle.

Go to Mesa Verde or Chaco canyon... the stoneworks built by the Anasazi there are superb. Go further south to Mesoamerica and the natives built structures on par with anything build in the ancient Middle East. Go further south and the quality of the native stoneworks surpassed even Ancient Greece and Egypt. (see Puma Punku... the stone cutting is so exact that many people are convinced only aliens could have done it )
While the Mesoamericans and Incas had great stonework what impresses me the most as a architect and contractor myself is the locations where they built. Building in the dense jungles or on the side of a cliff in the Andes mountains requires lots of human resources and rather complex logistics.



They built this on the side of a mountain with no heavy equipment and no metal tools. No easy feat by any stretch of the imagination.
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Old 11-28-2018, 10:09 PM
 
3,789 posts, read 2,100,236 times
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Mesa Verde was fantastic! Book the full day tour and they will take you through everything. We stayed in the park and had a great weekend. The highlight is taking the tour and climbing through the city itself. Just don't look down as you climb the latter at the end.
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Old 11-28-2018, 11:00 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
73,513 posts, read 65,198,218 times
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The northeastern tribes lived in longhouses, and Native peoples from Northern California up through Oregon and Washington builds longhouses of redwood or cedar planks. The Chinook Tribe of the Columbia River recently built a new plank house, open to the public. Large plank houses going back to the 1800's are still standing, along with the totem poles that mark the clan relationships of the head of each household, in coastal parts of Alaska and the Queen Charlotte Islands, aka Haida Gwaii.
Plank Houses - American Indian Tradition & Continuity

https://www.fws.gov/refuge/Ridgefiel...lankhouse.html ---Columbia River contemporary plank house

Northwest California plank house. The floor is below ground level.


Last edited by Ruth4Truth; 11-28-2018 at 11:33 PM..
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Old 11-28-2018, 11:10 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
73,513 posts, read 65,198,218 times
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Native people in the Southwest had monumental architecture, being located at the northern end of the MesoAmerican cultural zone that included the Aztecs and Maya to the south, with whom they traded. The Anasazi people built large apartment-like complexes five stories high, with round ceremonial chambers inside. Other cultures in the area had MesoAmerican style stone ball courts.The large Anasazi complexes were oriented to the south, to take advantage of passive solar heat. Chaco Canyon National Park is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, where many ruined complexes can be seen.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=...43554457237442

https://whc.unesco.org/en/list/353/gallery/

The nomadic peoples of the region, like the Navajo, had earth lodges, called hogans. In more modern times, they've been making them of logs.
https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=...43554983445736 --- Earth hogans

Log hogan:


Last edited by Ruth4Truth; 11-28-2018 at 11:30 PM..
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Old 11-28-2018, 11:44 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
73,513 posts, read 65,198,218 times
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Southeastern-style thatched roof wattle and daub house
https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=...43556186258114
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Old 11-29-2018, 07:33 AM
 
Location: Posting from my space yacht.
6,968 posts, read 2,641,165 times
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Native Americans were obviously not all the simple savages they were portrayed as being but let's not get carried away here. It's not like our astronauts had to pull an Iroquois dream catcher out of the lunar regolith before planting the American flag.
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Old 11-29-2018, 08:19 AM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
1,817 posts, read 678,230 times
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If you read Caesar's De Bello Gallico or Livy's Ab Conditio, you will see a remarkable similarity between European culture of that period and the culture (including architecture) that Europeans found when they arrived in N.Am.
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