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Old 01-23-2008, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Everett, Wa
601 posts, read 1,751,258 times
Reputation: 670

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Yes, I remember it fondly...10th and 11th grade at East Anchorage High school, Anchorage Alaska. Best place on earth to be young. Always a party, good fun and friends. Sometimes I wonder how I survived it!!!! Smoke was legal up there so no worries. Definatley did my share. My Dad had been to Nam 2 times and the war was then coming to an end. None of my friends
supported the war. I went to 1 protest. ( I remember I skipped school that day. And some photographer at the rally took my picture. It ended up on the front page of the newspaper. Boy was I ever busted by my folks for skipping school!!! Anyway good memories for me. Alaska the Last Frontier.......
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Old 01-23-2008, 03:30 PM
 
12,537 posts, read 18,633,771 times
Reputation: 19901
Quote:
Originally Posted by njkate View Post
You must of had AM radio...best station on the air that decade was WNEW FM 102.7 out of NY....I remember falling asleep each night listening to the night bird Alison Steele..great music no bubble gum pop for sure
Yeah that was pretty much 90% of mine and anyones listening - AM radio, top 40 hits. I'm sure there was progressive rocks stations in the big cities, not in my town. People listened to the AM radio in cars, and tapes, even 8tracks, where not yet that popular.

People nowadays think late 60's and early 70's must have had The Grateful Dead, The Byrds, Jimmi Hendrex , and Janis Joplin blaring from the radio at every corner, along with the cloud of marijuana smoke and peace march. Nope, most of the top 40 of that time was the most banal music in history - The Archies and The Osmonds and Captain and Tenille, combined with Mac Davis and Sammy Davis Jr and Glen Cambell, etc. 90% of radio was "top 40", very limited in what they play. THAT was radio music in the late 60's and early 70's.

Now, Joplin and Hendrix and the Dead did have there top 40 hits, and those got played, right before the latest Monkies hit (but I liked the Monkies) and then it was back to Michael Jackson singing "Ben".

Fortunetly the music has survived, the good stuff. I really didn't get to listen to them alot until the AOR and classic rock radio formats of the early and mid 80's started comming out and I started to get into 60's rock music like crazy and buying LP's. So now people swear that's what they listened to in the 60's. I just shake my head and say "Yeah, uh huh". Do people really think they would play a cut like The Doors "The End" or some of The Airplane's songs (with Grace Slick singing 'tear down the walls m*** f***ers') on the radio in the late 60's? Not unless you had access to one of the few underground stations or maybe exposed to someone with a good record collection in college.
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Old 01-23-2008, 04:16 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
1,427 posts, read 2,452,354 times
Reputation: 1778
I graduated from high school in 1971. It was a time of Volkswagen Bugs and buses, long hair on boys, girls with long hair parted down the middle and no makeup, suede jackets with fringe, Friday and Saturday night concerts in SF at Winterland and the old Family Dog at the beach, hitch hiking everywhere. Apartment walls painted deep purple, beads covering windows and hanging in interior doors and walls, candles and incense burning. The scent of marijuana was heavy in the air, as well as the scent of Patchuli (sp) oil . German Shepard/Husky mix dogs were very POPULAR!

I'll probably think of a dozen more things right after I press POST, but I'm having a senior moment and my mind is blank !
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Old 01-23-2008, 04:49 PM
 
23 posts, read 28,041 times
Reputation: 30
I saw the National Guard driving tanks dressed in full riot gear down Chapel Street in New Haven, CT at Yale University. My family and I all drove down to watch. They had bull-horns that night and were telling groups of students to go back to their dorm rooms.
This was about a year or so, after the killing of 4 students at Ohio State University and tensions were pretty high between the government and the college students. The Vietnam War was still in full-swing, but was starting to wind down. Everybody watched the same television shows, (usually on one T.V.) so people were'nt as divided demographically as they are today. If you watched something on television Sunday night, chances are everybody would have something to say about the program the following Monday morning! My parents seemed to worry about everything during those years. My brother ran away to join a commune for a while, took a lot of drugs, and basically was a self-centered pain in the a** like most teenagers then and probably now. Like everybody else we lived in a modest ranch house. It was common for families of 6 to live in houses no larger than 1600 square feet, with ONE bathroom. My parents never used credit cards, EVER! Back then, the average person thought that credit cards were for "rich people"! My friend and I would sit in her "rec room" and listen to Elton John's "Madman Across the Water" album, for what seemed like hours, until we wore out the vinyl and had to go out and buy another copy. Levi Jeans were 5 or 6 bucks a pair and were as stiff as cardboard when you first bought them until you bleached the crap out of them, and "sandpapered" them "worn"! I wore "mood rings" that changed colors, and had a few "pet rocks" which were all the rage for a short time. At home, my mother cooked from scratch every night (no microwaves!) , and we always sat down to dinner at the table together. And on week-ends it was a real treat to make Jiffy-Pop popcorn on the stove. Sometimes, on a Friday or Saturday night, we would go to the local drive-in and catch a stupid "B" movie, or an old horror show while sitting in lawn chairs. All in all, daily life was much simpler then, and people were relatively content with simple things. The news of a couple getting divorced in the neighborhood was considered "shocking" - and kept people talking for months!
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Old 01-23-2008, 06:34 PM
 
Location: Jonquil City (aka Smyrna) Georgia- by Atlanta
16,248 posts, read 21,461,864 times
Reputation: 3587
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dd714 View Post
Yeah that was pretty much 90% of mine and anyones listening - AM radio, top 40 hits. I'm sure there was progressive rocks stations in the big cities, not in my town. People listened to the AM radio in cars, and tapes, even 8tracks, where not yet that popular.

People nowadays think late 60's and early 70's must have had The Grateful Dead, The Byrds, Jimmi Hendrex , and Janis Joplin blaring from the radio at every corner, along with the cloud of marijuana smoke and peace march. Nope, most of the top 40 of that time was the most banal music in history - The Archies and The Osmonds and Captain and Tenille, combined with Mac Davis and Sammy Davis Jr and Glen Cambell, etc. 90% of radio was "top 40", very limited in what they play. THAT was radio music in the late 60's and early 70's.

Now, Joplin and Hendrix and the Dead did have there top 40 hits, and those got played, right before the latest Monkies hit (but I liked the Monkies) and then it was back to Michael Jackson singing "Ben".

Fortunetly the music has survived, the good stuff. I really didn't get to listen to them alot until the AOR and classic rock radio formats of the early and mid 80's started comming out and I started to get into 60's rock music like crazy and buying LP's. So now people swear that's what they listened to in the 60's. I just shake my head and say "Yeah, uh huh". Do people really think they would play a cut like The Doors "The End" or some of The Airplane's songs (with Grace Slick singing 'tear down the walls m*** f***ers') on the radio in the late 60's? Not unless you had access to one of the few underground stations or maybe exposed to someone with a good record collection in college.
I have Sirrius and listen to the 70s channel alot and lots of the music reeks even today (they call it the "Jukebox From Hell" on Sirrius). But the decade did give us some good stuff like the Allman Brothers, Steve Miller, Kansas, Atlanta Rythym Section, Creedence, Sly Stone, Pink Floyd and such. Even Black Sabbath was pretty good metal. But all the crap you had to listen to on AM to get to the few good songs was annoying as hell. You might hear an Osmonds song twice for every Creedence song. The BEST thing about the 70s was ALL IN THE FAMILY. It is still one of my favourite TV shows of all time and I still watch it and anybody that really wants a taste of the culture back then should watch it.
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Old 01-23-2008, 06:38 PM
 
Location: Jonquil City (aka Smyrna) Georgia- by Atlanta
16,248 posts, read 21,461,864 times
Reputation: 3587
Quote:
Originally Posted by ncgalnow View Post
I saw the National Guard driving tanks dressed in full riot gear down Chapel Street in New Haven, CT at Yale University. My family and I all drove down to watch. They had bull-horns that night and were telling groups of students to go back to their dorm rooms.
This was about a year or so, after the killing of 4 students at Ohio State University and tensions were pretty high between the government and the college students. The Vietnam War was still in full-swing, but was starting to wind down. Everybody watched the same television shows, (usually on one T.V.) so people were'nt as divided demographically as they are today. If you watched something on television Sunday night, chances are everybody would have something to say about the program the following Monday morning! My parents seemed to worry about everything during those years. My brother ran away to join a commune for a while, took a lot of drugs, and basically was a self-centered pain in the a** like most teenagers then and probably now. Like everybody else we lived in a modest ranch house. It was common for families of 6 to live in houses no larger than 1600 square feet, with ONE bathroom. My parents never used credit cards, EVER! Back then, the average person thought that credit cards were for "rich people"! My friend and I would sit in her "rec room" and listen to Elton John's "Madman Across the Water" album, for what seemed like hours, until we wore out the vinyl and had to go out and buy another copy. Levi Jeans were 5 or 6 bucks a pair and were as stiff as cardboard when you first bought them until you bleached the crap out of them, and "sandpapered" them "worn"! I wore "mood rings" that changed colors, and had a few "pet rocks" which were all the rage for a short time. At home, my mother cooked from scratch every night (no microwaves!) , and we always sat down to dinner at the table together. And on week-ends it was a real treat to make Jiffy-Pop popcorn on the stove. Sometimes, on a Friday or Saturday night, we would go to the local drive-in and catch a stupid "B" movie, or an old horror show while sitting in lawn chairs. All in all, daily life was much simpler then, and people were relatively content with simple things. The news of a couple getting divorced in the neighborhood was considered "shocking" - and kept people talking for months!
That be true too. We only had one TV which was a black and white Curtis Mathis and it only got 3 channels (no cable back then). We did not get a colour TV until later in the decade.
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Old 01-23-2008, 07:55 PM
 
Location: Dallas TX & AL Gulf Coast
6,848 posts, read 10,206,332 times
Reputation: 33355
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevK View Post
But the decade did give us some good stuff like the Allman Brothers, Steve Miller, Kansas, Atlanta Rythym Section, Creedence, Sly Stone, Pink Floyd and such.
Speaking of the Allman Brothers... we used to go to the city park in Macon, GA, to listen to them give free concerts on weekends (early 70's) before they became famous, then seeing Iron Butterfly live in concert (think "In a Gadda Da Vida"), great music era of the 60's continued. Another memory was our brand-new Ford Pinto that was a driving bomb we found out later... but only took $3.65 to fill it up! Also, hip-huggers, bell-bottoms, hot pants (not pants at all, shorts!), polyester leisure suits (ugh!), Saturday Night Live when it was awesome w/Chevy Chase, etc., late night TV w/Johnny Carson or Joey Bishop shows, end of the Vietnam war, end of Nixon (thank goodness for both!), ah, the list goes on. Great era!
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Old 01-23-2008, 08:01 PM
 
Location: Syracuse IS Central New York.
8,516 posts, read 3,980,310 times
Reputation: 4026
Default January 1972

Now let's see if I can remember that far back. I was 14, and in the 9th grade. I recall going to school, and liking reading Shakespeare for the first time. It's funny but right now I'm having a mini flashback to a typical school day. I can see and hear all of the teachers, the lockers, the bell to change classes.

Outside of school, the Vietnam war continued on, despite Nixon's "secret" plan to end the war which really turned out to be the the Paris peace talks that introduced the world to Henry Kissinger. One of the lowlights of the Paris talks was it seemed like it took ages for the participants to determine the shape of the table. Like that was SOOO important. They ended up with a round one.

There was an atmosphere of social awareness. Occasionally, there would be something known as a "teach in", that would be that all of your classes would be based on a particular issue, such as the environment, civil rights, Vietnam, etc. Although the first Earth Day was April 1970, my English teacher at the time took our class to go clean up a park with another class. What was was unusual about this is that he did this without permission from the school, let alone our parents. Can you imagine a teacher doing that today??? Anyway, it was memorable.

If I can think of anything else, I will add to this later.
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Old 01-23-2008, 08:11 PM
 
Location: Jonquil City (aka Smyrna) Georgia- by Atlanta
16,248 posts, read 21,461,864 times
Reputation: 3587
Quote:
Originally Posted by Easybreezy View Post
Now let's see if I can remember that far back. I was 14, and in the 9th grade. I recall going to school, and liking reading Shakespeare for the first time. It's funny but right now I'm having a mini flashback to a typical school day. I can see and hear all of the teachers, the lockers, the bell to change classes.

Outside of school, the Vietnam war continued on, despite Nixon's "secret" plan to end the war which really turned out to be the the Paris peace talks that introduced the world to Henry Kissinger. One of the lowlights of the Paris talks was it seemed like it took ages for the participants to determine the shape of the table. Like that was SOOO important. They ended up with a round one.

There was an atmosphere of social awareness. Occasionally, there would be something known as a "teach in", that would be that all of your classes would be based on a particular issue, such as the environment, civil rights, Vietnam, etc. Although the first Earth Day was April 1970, my English teacher at the time took our class to go clean up a park with another class. What was was unusual about this is that he did this without permission from the school, let alone our parents. Can you imagine a teacher doing that today??? Anyway, it was memorable.

If I can think of anything else, I will add to this later.
That would make you 48 or 49? My age
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Old 01-23-2008, 08:42 PM
 
Location: Tucson AZ & Leipzig, Germany
2,508 posts, read 7,839,001 times
Reputation: 3922
1971 + 72 were two of the most memorable years of my life. In 71 I was a high school exchange student in Chile the entire year. That was a grand adventure, and I had a chance to see so many places and meet so many people at the age of 17. I didn't speak English more than a couple of times that whole year, and my brain became so tuned to speaking Spanish that I interchange between both languages today without even giving it a second thought.
1972 was the year of my high school graduation. Lots of turmoil in the country and the world at the time, it seemed like one problem on top of the other. The economy was pretty lousy too. I started college at San Francisco State Univ in the fall of 72, there was an air of general discontent about lots of things going on. The one highlight is that in San Francisco bay area at that time, the music scene was very hot, incredible talent was there for all to enjoy. Just walking around the city during that era was enough to take my mind off all the other distractions and enjoy the good things in the world.
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