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Old 01-24-2008, 05:26 PM
 
Location: Jonquil City (aka Smyrna) Georgia- by Atlanta
16,248 posts, read 21,461,864 times
Reputation: 3587

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dd714 View Post
I would have loved to really have experienced that part of the 60's. Haight- Ashbury and all that, going to Woodstock, etc. Alas I was too young, to middle class suburban, and by the mid 70's when I came of age it was all over. I had to suffer through the "disco-era".
I actually was at Woodstock at the age of 11 with my older sis and 2 of her friends. From my point of view it is the most overhyped event in history! We went there on a Friday and were only supposed to stay until Saturday around noon and then head back to my aunt's place just outside Buffalo.
The traffic was bad that people just started to park anywhere behind and in front of everybody else and several cars were stuck in mud and were not going anywhere, Needless to say we did not get to leave until late Sunday and all I recall is almost no food, bathroom lines for portable bathrooms almost an hour long and no place to shower, clean up or change clothes. 3 long days of dirt and sweat and rain will make anybody miserable.
The crowd towards the stage was so big that you could not get close enough to see the performers (although they did have other little side shows) most of the time and the sound system was so bad you could not hear them either. Most people- us included- that had thought we could just "drive into town and get a cheap motel for the night" ended up sleeping on the ground of in cars because your car was blocked in and you could go nowhere.
There were lots of people that either did not bring enough food or any at all and the concessions were empty after the 1st day! Luckily they were able to helicopter in food and medical stuff.
I did not enjoy Woodstock at all. I actually enjoyed watching the movie more than being there. The movie was great. My only question was "why didn't it look and sound that good when I was there?" I was damn glad to get back to auntie Maries place, toss my clothes amd take a 2 hour long hot bath!
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Old 01-24-2008, 05:48 PM
 
Location: Big skies....woohoo
12,421 posts, read 2,867,780 times
Reputation: 2186
Wow...I was in the 5th and 6th grade. Hmmm, let's see, yup, the Partridge Family and David Cassidy were my favorite (5th grade). We had nicer spring weather then....warmer with a really great fresh air smell. We played jump rope and had hula hoops (pink, orange, green). My brother played little league baseball...girls weren't allowed to play then. It was a time when we could ride our bikes anywhere. We could go out to play or hang out all day and no one worried where we were..times have changed.
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Old 01-25-2008, 11:26 AM
 
Location: on an island
13,382 posts, read 41,068,055 times
Reputation: 13250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dd714 View Post
People nowadays think late 60's and early 70's must have had The Grateful Dead, The Byrds, Jimmi Hendrex , and Janis Joplin blaring from the radio at every corner, along with the cloud of marijuana smoke and peace march.
As in every decade, plenty of 70's music was wretched.
But I do have *some* fond memories of disco.
Quote:
Fortunetly the music has survived, the good stuff. I really didn't get to listen to them alot until the AOR and classic rock radio formats of the early and mid 80's started comming out and I started to get into 60's rock music like crazy and buying LP's. So now people swear that's what they listened to in the 60's. I just shake my head and say "Yeah, uh huh". Do people really think they would play a cut like The Doors "The End" or some of The Airplane's songs (with Grace Slick singing 'tear down the walls m*** f***ers') on the radio in the late 60's? Not unless you had access to one of the few underground stations or maybe exposed to someone with a good record collection in college.
Actually I think mainstream radio back then (before Clear Channel and its playlists) was much better than mainstream radio today.
And singles were still quite popular. If you liked the single, you'd go down to the record store, listen to it, and maybe buy the album. Then we'd all huddle in someone's bedroom or basement, pore over the album and liner notes, and rock out.
Word got around about who was worth listening to--and then there were the concerts. The Doors, Hendrix, the Stones--these were the days before lip synching and drum machines.
Visvaldis, I never had Fritz, but I still have my Fabulous Furry Freak Brothers comics.
I remember giggling over the National Lampoon--it was a fine publication.
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Old 01-25-2008, 12:26 PM
 
12,537 posts, read 18,633,771 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cil View Post
As in every decade, plenty of 70's music was wretched.
But I do have *some* fond memories of disco..

Yeah I was just thinking, would I rather listen to Donny Osmond's "Go Away Little Girl" or the latest Brittany Spears song. It's close but I think I can stomach Donny Osmand more than Brittany or her counterparts in lip- synched, over-processed, synthetic-corporate manufactured pop.

For me in the early 70's it was Mad Magazine.
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Old 01-25-2008, 12:53 PM
 
392 posts, read 1,717,373 times
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I would have been about 4th grade.
'71-'72 there was a law suit to bring cross district busing into the Detroit area. I grew up in the burbs and I remember it being a huge topic in our area. There were walkouts from school. My parents would have none of it, I was in school although there was only a few of us in class, the teacher really couldn't teach anything.
My brother pulled number 94 in the '71 draft (for guys going in '72). He was dead set against going and thought seriously about leaving for Canada. At the same time my oldest sister finished college and went into the Air Force.
My other sister took me to college with her sometimes. It was crazy.
Having all those college age siblings gave me a lot more exposure to the war and politics.
With my friends it was the Brady Bunch and CKLW, "The Big 8."
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Old 01-25-2008, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
4,739 posts, read 7,587,640 times
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I was at South Plantation High School in Fort Lauderdale Fla in 72, things were much different there than they are now. University Drive was as far west as you could go on a north and southbound road. We used to do a lot of fishing at the pump houses out in the areas that weren't being developed yet, bring home bags of shrimp catch 70lb Tarpin, 8 lb bass were common in the everglades.
The 7-11 used to give out free Slurpees on Halloween, MCdonalds used to advertise change back from your dollar on a Big Mac meal, RC Cola had free tickets to the theater under the cap of every bottle for a while, Soda Machines were 10 cents a bottle, bowling would cost you about 75 cents a game, It was a great time to be a teen.
Kids were always out side playing, we had neighborhood baseball games at least once a week in a vacant lot or at the ball field, we would skateboard anywhere and no one said anything. When it rained we would grab our skimboard and play in the puddles. It was ok to grab your motorcycle or mini bike and use it on school property or anyplace as long as you weren't in the road and you never got in trouble. We would jump off bridges into the canals and have a blast all day swimming.
Concert tickets were $3 - $5 and that was name bands. To make money I would mow yards for around $2 to $3 and anything else I could find like washing and waxing cars for about the same amount of money.
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Old 01-25-2008, 03:26 PM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
37,449 posts, read 46,188,003 times
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Big hair, bell bottoms, hot pants, go-go boots. My friends and I smoked and drank cocktails through our pregnancies. Nobody worried about perverts around every corner. We had a dishwasher, but no microwave. The shootings at Kent State happened. VietNam war was going on. We had a 1968 Pontiac Bonneville that was LOOONG, and no such thing as factory air..we had it put in. I think it had seatbelts, but I'm not sure.
In March of 72, Burt Reynolds was the centerfold of the first Playgirl Magazine, which caused quit a stir. I had just had a baby (fortunately not maimed by the cocktail drinking), and someone brought me the issue in the hospital.
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Old 01-25-2008, 06:18 PM
 
Location: Great Lakes region
417 posts, read 993,572 times
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I think it depends on what part of the country you were in. I was 10 years old then, in a farming / manufacturing area. Things were pretty conservative, friendships and families seemed closer, department stores still had basement sales and you could get an ice cream cone for a quarter. Some streets were still paved with brick and you could still buy a NeHi soft drink. Psychadelic patterns were everywhere - on clothing, notebooks, even the pencils I used in school. Fringe was big, fringed vests, fringed pants, fringed purses, fringed anything. You rarely heard anyone say the "F" word in public, and it was normal for kids to accompany their parents grocery shopping. The greater part of the adult population smoked and saw nothing wrong with it. A kid could go into any store and buy a pack of cigarettes for their Dad. There was still a great deal of respect for authority - parents, teachers, police, etc.
Young girls were in love with Bobby Sherman or David Cassidy, and wanted to grow up to be like Cher. We watched All In The Family, Maude, Mary Tyler Moore, Ironside, Columbo, Carol Burnett, and there were more game shows than you could shake a stick at. You could go to school and know that everyone else watched the same TV show you did the night before. Nixon was president, there was a meat boycott, The Soviet Union was scary, and the word "Watergate" had yet to be heard. You could still attend church class in school and put up a nativity scene on public ground.

Last edited by us2indaup; 01-25-2008 at 06:32 PM..
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Old 01-26-2008, 04:56 PM
 
Location: Jonquil City (aka Smyrna) Georgia- by Atlanta
16,248 posts, read 21,461,864 times
Reputation: 3587
Quote:
Originally Posted by us2indaup View Post
I think it depends on what part of the country you were in. I was 10 years old then, in a farming / manufacturing area. Things were pretty conservative, friendships and families seemed closer, department stores still had basement sales and you could get an ice cream cone for a quarter. Some streets were still paved with brick and you could still buy a NeHi soft drink. Psychadelic patterns were everywhere - on clothing, notebooks, even the pencils I used in school. Fringe was big, fringed vests, fringed pants, fringed purses, fringed anything. You rarely heard anyone say the "F" word in public, and it was normal for kids to accompany their parents grocery shopping. The greater part of the adult population smoked and saw nothing wrong with it. A kid could go into any store and buy a pack of cigarettes for their Dad. There was still a great deal of respect for authority - parents, teachers, police, etc.
Young girls were in love with Bobby Sherman or David Cassidy, and wanted to grow up to be like Cher. We watched All In The Family, Maude, Mary Tyler Moore, Ironside, Columbo, Carol Burnett, and there were more game shows than you could shake a stick at. You could go to school and know that everyone else watched the same TV show you did the night before. Nixon was president, there was a meat boycott, The Soviet Union was scary, and the word "Watergate" had yet to be heard. You could still attend church class in school and put up a nativity scene on public ground.
I remember about the F word and smoking! You knew somebody was highly pissed off if they said the F word! Except in Hustler magazine, it just was not used much at all. And lots of folks smoked including me. At my high school they had a designated student smoking area outside with a cigarette urn. I remember as a little kid in the 60s that mothers would smoke in the grocery store and the grocery carts had little ashtrays with Virgina Slims ads on them! People smoked inside of buildings and everywhere else back then.
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Old 01-26-2008, 05:02 PM
 
Location: Jonquil City (aka Smyrna) Georgia- by Atlanta
16,248 posts, read 21,461,864 times
Reputation: 3587
Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
Big hair, bell bottoms, hot pants, go-go boots. My friends and I smoked and drank cocktails through our pregnancies. Nobody worried about perverts around every corner. We had a dishwasher, but no microwave. The shootings at Kent State happened. VietNam war was going on. We had a 1968 Pontiac Bonneville that was LOOONG, and no such thing as factory air..we had it put in. I think it had seatbelts, but I'm not sure.
In March of 72, Burt Reynolds was the centerfold of the first Playgirl Magazine, which caused quit a stir. I had just had a baby (fortunately not maimed by the cocktail drinking), and someone brought me the issue in the hospital.
It had seatbelts (no shoulder belt) because we had a Pontiac Catalina from the same year. That was the first car I ever drove when I was like 12. My older sister would let me drive it in an empty parking lot. It had a 400 engine in it as I recall and it was alot better than the chevy wagon we had before that. It was a big car by todays standards but you could get some rubber from it if you punched it!
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