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Old 02-21-2008, 10:44 AM
 
Location: San Antonio Texas
10,725 posts, read 9,611,211 times
Reputation: 4769

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Bagu View Post
There has to be a few of us old fogeys around that can refer back to NICE old memorys. With me, I recall the 1 dip ice cream cone for 3 cents, a double for 5 cents, a triple for 10 cents. Fish and Chips wrapped in a newspaper cone and sprinkled with malt vinegar. A piece of apple pie and a Coke for 20 cents. Not just food, but the entry of the WW11 to the Europe theater and then the US dragged into it. With "IKE" holding back the advance to Berlin allowing the Russians to advance and occupy it. Seems like the world is no different today. Wars seem to be neverending. I would still like to see another 3 cent ice cream cone. But no way, never happen. Such is memories. Steve
those were not particuarly good times for nonwhite americans. my mexican american grandparents and great grandparents endured a lot of discrimination in south texas. they were not allowed in certain restaurants, neighborhoods, etc. there were race riots between black americans and white americans in several cities, most notably the riots in detroit, 1943. there was also lynching and forced segregation throughout the south. japanese americans were sent to concentration camps during the war, etc. it was not that wonderful for everybody, imo.
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Old 02-21-2008, 03:32 PM
 
788 posts, read 1,249,208 times
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Most of my memories of those years are happy ones, and they all occurred prior to my 11th birthday. I remember when my dad and uncles returned from the war, somebody brought me a sailor suit, complete with p-coat, and I was very proud of myself.

I remember the horse-drawn carts, the iceman, the coal deliveries, and hopping the freight trains into Chicago. Since I never had the 7 cents for the bus ride to Lake Michigan I crawled through a back window and would have a very enjoyable day at the lake. Same with Comiskey Park; admission was 50 cents so we would just crawl under the fence.

The freight trains travelled slowly through our neighborhood, and we would holler "chalk", whereupon a brakeman would emerge from the caboose and pitch a few large pieces onto the ground, which were used to mark the bases in the street for our softball games.

In the summer, a teenager would open a fire hydrant, and all the kids in the neighborhood would have a great time, until the police arrived to spoil the fun.

Of the three families on the block that had a tv set, one would invite everyone to see the Milton Berle Show, popcorn included. On Tuesdays the women gathered at a pre-determined home and prayed for world peace, and sometimes the kids were made to go too.

When we finally had our own tv, I would stare at the test pattern for 15 minutes until the Howdy Doody Show came on.
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Old 02-21-2008, 03:41 PM
 
Location: Land of 10000 Lakes + some
2,885 posts, read 224,532 times
Reputation: 346
For memories you cannot recall, there is an EXCELLENT book called The Crazy Ladies of Pearl Street which describes the songs, the lifestyle, neighborhood communities, coal and ice delivery with details, why one had to spend a full day day washing clothes, games kids' played, candies, clothing, etc.
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Old 02-21-2008, 03:46 PM
 
Location: Land of 10000 Lakes + some
2,885 posts, read 224,532 times
Reputation: 346
We were expanding and remodeling the house and were digging out the new basement. My dad knew the old cesspool was there somewhere but he couldn't find it - until he stepped on the wrong place and the buried wood covering gave way and he fell into it. He didn't think so, but it was the funniest thing my brother and I had ever seen, especially since just the week before he was up in the attic and fell through the ceiling into the living room.


Toooo funny!!! LMAO!
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Old 02-21-2008, 04:00 PM
 
Location: Journey's End
10,184 posts, read 18,797,403 times
Reputation: 3694
There is no doubt we could share unfavourable memories of these same years--but I believe the OP is "fond."

Quote:
Originally Posted by wehotex View Post
those were not particuarly good times for nonwhite americans. my mexican american grandparents and great grandparents endured a lot of discrimination in south texas. they were not allowed in certain restaurants, neighborhoods, etc. there were race riots between black americans and white americans in several cities, most notably the riots in detroit, 1943. there was also lynching and forced segregation throughout the south. japanese americans were sent to concentration camps during the war, etc. it was not that wonderful for everybody, imo.
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Old 02-22-2008, 05:09 PM
 
Location: Woods of Missouri with many Critters
25,441 posts, read 8,984,255 times
Reputation: 31395
My earliest recollection is starting kindergarten in Chicago at the ripe old age of 4 years and 7 months. Then I remember the signs in the store fronts. They were large cardboard signs with a rather menacing (to a child) drawing of Uncle Sam leaning forward and pointing a finger to the viewer...saying 'Uncle Sam wants YOU!'. My sister was born in Chicago and shortly afterwards we moved back to St. Louis.

On my walks to grade school I would pass by the horse drawn milk wagon and at time the driver would allow us children to pet this splendid animal. My grandparents had a sign in their window for ice for the 'ice box'. One side had 10 and 25 pounds and the reverse had 50 and 100. They always only wanted the 25 pound block. And yes, we were sometimes allowed to get some of the chips of ice off of the wagon.

The theatre in our neighborhood charged 10 cents to get in and a nickel for a bag of popcorn! The buses and streetcars charged 5 cents for children under 12 and I remember my cousins and I riding them on a Sunday afternoon just for pleasure and something to do. Would get transfers and hopefully be able to return to our beginning.

We didn't have a car until my Daddy returned from the Navy. It was an older (of course) Pontiac and I thought it was the most beautiful thing I had ever seen. MY dad was so proud of it. and yes, we had ration books also. Remember buying war bonds and stamps either at school or at the theatres. Collected cans and newspapers also for the 'war effort' as it was called, back then.!

I do have many, many memories of those years. And now that we have more or less inherited one of my husband's aunts boxes of post cards, letters and greeting cards, I now have more reminders of those times so long ago. Some of the letters are so fascinating, referring to Bob Hope and Sally Rand performing and entertaining the troops at the bases. One letter even has the sad commentary concerning the war causing mothers to take jobs at the defense plants and the children coming home to empty houses which, in the writer's opinion, was leading to the delinquency of said minors. Sad.

Most of the post cards are very pretty. Lace, velvet and neat little cut-outs on them. It's fun to sort them out and I will be passing these onto our children later. the aunt never had children of her own. Yep, lots of memories, some good, some sad, some inspiring, some questionable, and some downright amusing.
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Old 02-27-2008, 05:55 AM
 
Location: Cold Frozen North
1,926 posts, read 3,230,130 times
Reputation: 1206
It's interesting to read the posts here on those decades. I wasn't born until the '50s, but life just seemed to be so much simpler and enjoyable. You didn't need as many material things to make you happy.

Now if I could only build that time machine and jump back to better times.
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Old 02-27-2008, 08:04 AM
 
Location: Journey's End
10,184 posts, read 18,797,403 times
Reputation: 3694
I don't want people to think the 30s and 40s were better. I wasn't born until the 40s, but even with the simpler life, there were challenges, just challenges that are different than today.

Let's not forget the 30s and 40s also includes some serious, and not pleasant events: the Great Depression and WWII, among others.

So while it may seem glamorous, it also had its pains.

Quote:
Originally Posted by HighPlainsDrifter73 View Post
It's interesting to read the posts here on those decades. I wasn't born until the '50s, but life just seemed to be so much simpler and enjoyable. You didn't need as many material things to make you happy.

Now if I could only build that time machine and jump back to better times.
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Old 02-29-2008, 09:56 PM
 
Location: northeast US
739 posts, read 1,099,018 times
Reputation: 446
Those were also the days of the great polio epidemics, prior to the introduction of the Salk vaccine in 1955-56, and the support from Eleanor Roosevelt and Dr. Basil O'Connor of the March of Dimes for getting everyone vaccinated.

People were cut down by the hundreds of thousands. Everyone from that time had a friend or relative affected; photos of iron lungs and kids in heavy steel leg braces were very common.
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Old 02-29-2008, 11:59 PM
 
14,208 posts, read 26,413,171 times
Reputation: 8370
Default Bantam 60 Roadster... Cars of the 1930's

Anyone remember the cars of the 1930's and 40's?

One of my favorites is the American Bantam built in Butler PA

This is a 1938 Bantam Roadster model 60. It was called the Model 60 because it was advertised to go 60 mph and get 60 mpg!

Bantam ceased auto production to concentrate on the first WWII Jeeps... a vehicle which Bantam invented for the War Department and later was also built by Ford and Willys.
Attached Thumbnails
Fond Memorys of the 30's & 40's, ANYONE??-bantam-20ironstone.jpg  
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