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Old 01-07-2017, 01:33 AM
 
Location: Saint Paul
824 posts, read 337,456 times
Reputation: 921

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Quote:
Originally Posted by slowlane3 View Post
John Hancock, John Jay, and General Ulysses Grant owned slaves too.
Grant's wife's family owned slaves. Maybe they sent one of their slaves to be Julia Dent Grant's servant. But General Grant did not own slaves. There is one source that said Grant purchased a slave from Julia's brother, but then emancipated it soon after.
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Old 01-07-2017, 02:32 AM
 
Location: Glasgow Scotland
14,696 posts, read 11,921,806 times
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Im surprised to learn that some people think" What If" post titles are anything to do with history..
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Old 01-08-2017, 02:25 AM
 
Location: Old Mother Idaho
20,236 posts, read 13,577,745 times
Reputation: 14944
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dd714 View Post
Yes the TV segment is intended for entertainment but sadly, this lack of historical knowledge is supported by other studies.
If you click on the link it explains that some did not wish the answers to be broadcast (and those are not shown), others indeed were answering sincerely but just wished to be on TV.
So, ummm, what's your point? I'm confused here. Does anyone even doubt that lack of history education is an issue in the US?
It wasn't always like this.

When I was a kid, growing up in Idaho in the 1950s, I was taught American history and Idaho history in the 5th and 6th grades, with another round of American history in high school, along with World history.

That curriculum was state-wide. Even in our 1-room schoolhouses, which still exist here.

My grandmother was a former schoolteacher who was teaching school before she graduated from high school herself, and we talked about this. She said her required curriculum included history beginning in the 4th grade. She taught in the late 1920s to mid 1930s. The history she taught was always a mix of American, World and Current Events, from state-supplied text books. Local newspapers were allowed as texts for current events. She said she was also supplied with maps and history was tied into geography, another topic that is not longer taught.

I wasn't taught much geography. My grandmother said it is important, as the place a person comes from determines how they live, what their religion is, and what the priorities of a nation are. A desert nation is different from a mountainous nation or a tropical nation, and their histories all reflect their geography.

Literacy and history once were firmly hand in hand in American schools. How and why it faded is something I've never been able to discover, but it happened.

Without history, every new generation is left floating, with no understanding of the forces that surround and influence them, and the causes that created those forces. Knowing where one comes from often determines where one will go in life. History grounds a person like nothing else can, and gives a life direction.
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Old 01-09-2017, 10:37 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
52,958 posts, read 52,115,852 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by J Baustian View Post
Grant's wife's family owned slaves. Maybe they sent one of their slaves to be Julia Dent Grant's servant. But General Grant did not own slaves. There is one source that said Grant purchased a slave from Julia's brother, but then emancipated it soon after.
It?
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Old 01-10-2017, 02:53 PM
 
5,115 posts, read 4,476,779 times
Reputation: 4363
Quote:
Originally Posted by J Baustian View Post
Grant's wife's family owned slaves. Maybe they sent one of their slaves to be Julia Dent Grant's servant. But General Grant did not own slaves. There is one source that said Grant purchased a slave from Julia's brother, but then emancipated it soon after.
I remember this about Grant, looked it up when I found that he had owned a slave.

After leaving the army in the 1850's Grant tried to make a go of it as a farmer, and his in-laws gave him a farm and a slave to help him work the farm. Grant failed as a farmer, and he was in some hefty debt as a result. Grant could have sold the slave given to him to pay off a substantial portion of his debt, but instead Grant chose to emancipate the slave, William Jones.
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Old 01-10-2017, 03:29 PM
 
3,395 posts, read 3,270,255 times
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I was surprised when I read about the San Francisco Vigilance Committee while reading the new Sherman biography.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Fr...e_of_Vigilance


I had never heard this chapter in US history. Every time vigilante justice is portrayed in film/TV, it is an unmitigated disaster, but it sounds like this was pretty successful (although lacking in due process).
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Old 01-14-2017, 12:12 AM
 
Location: Saint Paul
824 posts, read 337,456 times
Reputation: 921
In August 1775 Alexander Hamilton was in a volunteer militia in New York. When British troops retreated to RN ships in the harbor, Hamilton and his colleagues stole 21 of the 24 cannon in the Battery, while under fire from the HMS Asia.

So, in an instant, their militia became an artillery company, and Hamilton set about teaching himself the art and science of artillery. Cannon are useless without gunpowder and shells, so Hamilton set out to raise money to buy the necessary supplies. It was not until March 1776 that the company became a proper artillery company, able to take the field of battle, and Hamilton was commissioned as its captain.

Hamilton was born in either January 1755 or January 1757, so he was either 19 or 21 years of age.

The part I found surprising was that Hamilton did not wait until someone asked him if he wanted to be a captain of artillery -- he went out and obtained the cannon on his own, by stealing them from the British.
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Old 01-14-2017, 03:14 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
6,894 posts, read 9,586,689 times
Reputation: 6150
Quote:
Originally Posted by J Baustian View Post
In August 1775 Alexander Hamilton was in a volunteer militia in New York. When British troops retreated to RN ships in the harbor, Hamilton and his colleagues stole 21 of the 24 cannon in the Battery, while under fire from the HMS Asia.

So, in an instant, their militia became an artillery company, and Hamilton set about teaching himself the art and science of artillery. Cannon are useless without gunpowder and shells, so Hamilton set out to raise money to buy the necessary supplies. It was not until March 1776 that the company became a proper artillery company, able to take the field of battle, and Hamilton was commissioned as its captain.

Hamilton was born in either January 1755 or January 1757, so he was either 19 or 21 years of age.

The part I found surprising was that Hamilton did not wait until someone asked him if he wanted to be a captain of artillery -- he went out and obtained the cannon on his own, by stealing them from the British.
Yes, Alexander Hamilton was just a college student at the time. He was attending King College, today's Columbia University. One of the younger founding fathers.

Another little trivia about Hamilton - they just moved his house! Hamilton Grange was moved from being squeezed between two buildings to a nicer location inside a park.
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Old 01-23-2017, 07:56 PM
 
Location: Saint Paul
824 posts, read 337,456 times
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Something I just read today, about World War II.

Every time the Germans sent a bombing raid across the Channel, there seemed to be British fighter planes ready to attack them.

The British had radar. That's how they knew when the German bombers were in the air and where they were headed. But to mislead the Germans, they created a story that the coast watchers were given extra rations of carrots, so they had exceptionally good eyesight.

To some extent the Germans believed this story, and started growing more carrots for their own people.

And after the war, people everywhere including the US thought that carrots were essential for eyesight. Or at least that's what mothers told their children. In reality, carrots are only effective when a person already has a severe vitamin deficiency. Most people in the developed countries get adequate Vitamin A from other sources.
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Old 01-25-2017, 10:12 AM
 
6,128 posts, read 2,358,298 times
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Up until relatively recently, most French people couldn't speak French. It was a prestige language spoken by the upper classes, particularly the ruling class. French was a lingua franca, and the international language of diplomacy, yet most French people spoke their own separate regional languages and dialects. As recently as 1880, only 20% of the country spoke French as a first language, and only half of those were completely literate in the language. It remained a minority language in France well into the 10th century.

Eventually the government aggressively promoted French throughout the country, suppressing the regional languages and dialects, until pretty much everyone could speak it, similar to how English was forced upon the Irish. This greatly helped France catch up with the UK and Germany once again, especially in an economic sense, since people could now move around and communicate with one another far more easily. But it also left a legacy of bitterness among those who felt that their identities had been oppressed.
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