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Old 12-22-2018, 08:19 AM
 
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well I'm not yet very sure of what i may have to say but Hamilton,Alexander did not also help found the national bank but once the bank was founded the nation became rich but soon after the corrupt government probably taxed the people so much only the state is rich and the people aren't the federal bank is a great idea but in the wrong hand's the nation would get worse
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Old 12-22-2018, 09:17 AM
 
Location: western East Roman Empire
6,316 posts, read 10,383,226 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wordsmith12 View Post
Most people would say that Hamilton and Jefferson were the brainiest of the Founding Fathers.

What's your opinion?
On a personal level, Mr. Hamilton got himself killed in a public duel over stupid politics at a relatively young age, while Mr. Jefferson outlasted most of his contemporaries in public life and died peacefully in the privacy of his own home as a mature human being.

Who was smarter?

Great quote from I, Claudius ... "As for being half-witted, what can I say? Except that I have survived to middle age with half my wits, while thousands have died with all of theirs intact. Apparently, quality of wits is more important than quantity."


As for legacy, yeah, we probably live more in Hamilton's framework than Jefferson's; I don't think Mr. Jefferson foresaw the extent of the industrial revolution and the long-term implications of it globally, while Hamilton was right away more in tune to overseas trade and finance.

As president, at least, perhaps Mr. Jefferson's greatest legacy was the Louisiana Purchase, that was a good deal and key to westward expansion from sea to shining sea, development of inland waterways and later the railways.

It's not too late for this country to enjoy a period, a long period, of beautiful introspection, guns at the ready of course.
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Old 12-22-2018, 11:12 AM
 
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My opinion, Jefferson was much more creative & curious than Hamilton. Jefferson probably possessed more innate intelligence than Hamilton..

And to the original poster's other question.. I would include Franklin & Washington in the mix w/other cerebral Founding Fathers.. both were smart & uniquely wise.
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Old 12-22-2018, 11:38 AM
 
Location: Texas
34,012 posts, read 18,479,015 times
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Lightbulb Jefferson or Hamilton: Who was smarter?

Jefferson, without a doubt.


He never agreed to a stupid duel over who has the bigger ****.


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Old 12-23-2018, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Sandpoint, Idaho
2,889 posts, read 5,173,687 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wordsmith12 View Post
Most people would say that Hamilton and Jefferson were the brainiest of the Founding Fathers.

Do you agree? If so, which of the two would you say was more brilliant? Would you throw Ben Franklin into the mix?

It seems Jefferson was a polymath who wore more hats than any other Founding Father:

- architect
- writer of the Declaration of Independence
- linguist
- wine connoisseur
- botanist
- philosopher
- inventor
- statesman
- founder of the University of Virginia

Hamilton, on the other hand, was the brains behind our financial system. He also fought in the war, co-wrote the Federalist Papers, founded the Bank of New York, established the first Bank of the US, and favored manufacturing and trade (as opposed to Jefferson's idea of an agrarian society).

There's no question we're living in Hamilton's America, not Jefferson's.

Do you think it's fair to say Hamilton was the financial genius, while Jefferson was more well-rounded across different fields/disciplines? I do know both of them devoured books by Plutarch and other classics.

What's your opinion?
Hard to answer, but let me put it this way. the US was fortune to have Jefferson, but the US would not exist today nor reached the the heights that it has without Hamilton.
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Old 12-23-2018, 09:09 AM
 
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In once sense, Jefferson was a polymath. But he had a curious blind spot: His fantasy about agrarian societies being better than industrialized ones.
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Old 12-23-2018, 09:22 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MinivanDriver View Post
In once sense, Jefferson was a polymath. But he had a curious blind spot: His fantasy about agrarian societies being better than industrialized ones.
Driver, I wouldn't characterize Jefferson's advocacy for an agrarian society as 'fantasy'. I'd say it's more subjective preference..
I'd also say your description of Jefferson as 'a polymath..in one sense', is an understatement. He was accomplished in a very broad sense(s). Inventor, author, political leader, political philosopher, started UVa, etc.. Peace
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Old 12-24-2018, 11:04 AM
 
4,629 posts, read 1,898,172 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Babe_Ruth View Post
Driver, I wouldn't characterize Jefferson's advocacy for an agrarian society as 'fantasy'. I'd say it's more subjective preference..
I'd also say your description of Jefferson as 'a polymath..in one sense', is an understatement. He was accomplished in a very broad sense(s). Inventor, author, political leader, political philosopher, started UVa, etc.. Peace



Well, subjective preference based on an unrealistic view of the world, especially given the trends already afoot. I'm thankful that the United States grew from the economic foundation laid down by Hamilton, not Jefferson.



And as far as your second point is concerned:

polymath

noun
  1. a person of great and varied learning


Derived Forms polymathic , adjective polymathy ( pəˈlɪməθɪ ), noun Word Origin for polymath

C17: from Greek polumathēs having much knowledge






Polymath is not a synonym for autodidact.








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Old 12-24-2018, 11:19 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
5,473 posts, read 9,741,741 times
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But the trend towards industrialization, especially in the US, was in its infancy compared to an already established agrarian society during Jefferson's day. And America had the land available, at least at that time, to afford citizens the ability to own and work land. The industrial trend was far further along in Europe because they lacked sufficient land.

Not saying Jefferson was right, especially considering that his holdings went far beyond that of the yeoman farmer, just that his position was understandable at the time.
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Old 12-24-2018, 11:35 AM
 
Location: western East Roman Empire
6,316 posts, read 10,383,226 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maf763 View Post
But the trend towards industrialization, especially in the US, was in its infancy compared to an already established agrarian society during Jefferson's day. And America had the land available, at least at that time, to afford citizens the ability to own and work land. The industrial trend was far further along in Europe because they lacked sufficient land.

Not saying Jefferson was right, especially considering that his holdings went far beyond that of the yeoman farmer, just that his position was understandable at the time.
Yes, it certainly was.

At any rate, agriculture and industrialization are not mutually exclusive, they go hand in hand, and the US (as well as others) has done both at the same time.
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